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THE STORY 



■ Thirty Eighth Kegdieint 



MASSACHUSETTS VOLUNTEERS. 



(JEOKCrE W POWEKS. 




D A K I X A X O M K T C A I^ F 

1. -«;.;. 










fj/UJvvJ^ 



UaaJO^ 



} 



Entered, according to Act of Congrcs.", in the year 1865, by 

GEORGE W. .^^OWERS, 

In the Clerks Office of the District Court of the District of Massachutet*?. 



PREFACE. 



In the following pages, an attempt has been made to present 
a connected and reliable account of the movements of the 
Thirty Eighth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers during 
its term of service in the army of the United States. It has 
not been the purpose of the writer to describe the movements 
of armies, or chronicle the results of campaigns, except 
to illustrate more fully the doings of the regiment. Even 
in the record of battles, he has rather endeavored to confine 
himself to the particular part taken by the regiment, than 
to any more extended view ; and has preferred to give more 
prominence to those smaller matters peculiar to its experience. 
Nothing has been drawn from imagination, and no attempt 
made at word-psunting. Neither has it been attempted to 
describe the scenery of the country, or the manners of the 
people, in the region where the regiment performed its service. 
The scope of the work would not allow of this. 

Where all, or nearly all, did their duty to the best of their 
ability, it would be invidious to single out a few, and bring 
them into prominent notice. Consequently, individual names 
seldom occur in the text ; and where they do, it is only to 



IV PREFACE. 

illustrate some movement, or give a clearer idea of the otcur- 
rences alluded to. During thirty-two of the thirty-five months* 
service here recorded, the writer was constantly with his regi- 
ment, and noted down the daily events, for the benefit of 
friends at home. For the remaining time, including a large 
part of the campaign in the Shenandoah, when he was sick in 
hospital, he is indebted to the letters, diaries, and conversa- 
tions of his messmates, Messrs. Joseph G. Bartlett, Richard A. 
Fitzgerald, and Nathaniel Monroe. He would also return his 
thanks to Adjutant Wellington, for valuable official papers, and 
for assistance, and to Lieut.-Col. Richardson, and Captains 
Rundlet, Bennett, Jewell, Rowland, and Davis, for the muster- 
out rolls of the regiment. 

The writer is well aware that the same objects are seen 
by different parties in a widely different light ; and he 
has had a lively illustration of the fact while endeavor- 
ing to learn the movements of the regiment during his ab- 
sence ; for, while all agreed as to the main points, as soon as 
details were entered upon there was a wide difference of opin- 
ion, or of memory. However, he trusts that nothing essential 
has been misstated. 

The roll of the regiment was compiled from duplicate 
copies at' the muster-out rolls taken at Savannah, with the 
exception of Companies B and H, which were copied from the 
rolls in the office of the Adjutant General, whose assistants 
courteously permitted them to be used. These rolls contain 



PREFACE. V 

the particulars relating to each man as far as known at the 
muster-out of the regiment. Additional items have been ob- 
tained from the non-commissioned officers of the various 
companies, and much care taken to have this portion of the 
work correct. But owing to the frequent carelessness and 
neglect of hospital officials in sending returns to the regiment, 
and from other causes, errors may have crept in, which will 
not be wondered at, considering the numerous dates and other 
minutiae recorded. With all its faults, the author commends it 
to his comrades and to the friends of the regiment, with the 
hope that it may occasionally revive old associations, and keep 
alive old memories. 

G. W. P. 
Boston, December, 1866. 



B» 



COlsrTEIifTS. 



CHAPTER I. PAGE 

State of the country in the summer of 1862 — Gall for six hundred thousand 
volunteers — The Thirty Eighth rendezvous at Lynnfield and West Cam- 
bridge—Visit of Cos. A, B, and F, to the City of Cambridge — Depart- 
ure of the Regiment from the State — Passage through Philadelphia— 
Arrival at Baltimore — Camp Belger, 1 



CHAPTER n. 

Leave Belger — Visit of Baltimore Ladies — Camp Cram — Religious Services 
— Drills — Band — Marching Orders — Camp Emory — Return of Co. 
K to Regiment- Cold Weather— Departure from Emory — Take Trans- 
ports — Fortress Monroe — Target-Shooting — Washing in Salt Creek , 16 

CHAPTER m. 

Departure from Fortress Monroe — Sea-voyage— Arrival at Ship Island — 
Christmas Day — Embark for New Orleans — Up the Mississippi — Land 
at Carrollton — Camp Kearney — Col. Ingraham in command of Bri- 
gade — Plaquemine Expedition — Unpleasant Duty — Break Camp pre- 
paratory to taking the Field, 26 

CHAPTER IV. 

Baton Rouge — Review by General Banks — March on Port Hudson — Pas- 
aofSfi of the Batteries by Hartford and Albatross — Burning of the Mis- 
sissippi — Return to Baton Rouge — Woodchopping — Embark for Algiers 
— Easter Incident — Take Cars for Brashear — Berwick City, . . 49 

CHAPTER V. 

On the March again— Co. F Detached to guard Bridge —CentreviUe— Bat- 
tle of Bisland — Pursuit of the Enemy — Franklin — District of the 
Ttehe — Neutral Flags — A Day's Rest — Fording a Bayou — Opelousas, 63 



VIII CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER VL 

Camp atOpelousas — Oottoa Tersus Potatoes — Fourth Wisconsin Cavalry 

— Term '^ boys" not to be used in Third Brigade — Arrival of Qrier- 
son's (javalry at Baton Rouge — The Harch resumed — Alexandria — 
RedRiver— Start for the Mississippi— Morganza, . . . .80 

CHAPTER VIL 

Cross the Mississippi — Bayou Sara — Storm — St. Francisrille — Approack 
Port Hudson — Skirmish on the 26th of May — Negro Soldiers —Battle 
of May 27 — Death of Lieut.-Col. Rodman — The Ravines, ... 88 

CHAPTER VHL 

Relieved — March to Clinton — Great Heat — Deserting a Plantation — Re- 
turn to Port Hudson — Assault on the 14th of June — Heavy Loss in 
the Thirtiy Eighth, 101 

CHAPTER IX. 

After the Battle— Great Mail — Burial of the Dead— Remove into the 
Ravines — Deserters — Fall of Yieksburg- Surrender of Port Hudson 

— A Disappohitment — Stores Plains — Night March to Baton Rouge — 
Embark for Donaldsville — Dress Parades — Six Months' Pay, . 112 

CHAPTER X. 

Back to Baton Rouge — The Highland Road — Camp Rodman — Bivouac on 
the Boulevards — A and K detailed for Provost Duty — Co. I sent to Pla- 
quemine — Camp Banks — Picket Duty — Cold Weather — New Year's 
BaU—Visitof Mr. Wellington— Flag-Raising— Recruits, . 119 



CHAPTER XI. 

The Spring Campaign — Leave Baton Rouge — Port Hudson again — Fort de 
Russy — Red River Country — Alexandria— Departure of the Army for 
Shreveport— The Second Division left at Alexandria — Disaster— The 
Thirty Eighth embark on the Mlttie Stephens — Guerilla Attack — 
Grand Ecore, 126 

CHAPTER Xn. 

Grand Ecore — What caused the Repulse? — Retreat through the Plae 
Woods — Battle of Cane River — Rear Guard — The Retreat continued 
— Arrival at Alexandria, . 131 



CONTENTS. IX 



CHAPTER Xm. 

The Fleet in Danger — Red River Dammed — Fora^ng Expedition — Depart- 
ure firom Alexandria— Captured SlailB — Battle of Mansura Plains — 
Scarcity of Water — On the Old Rood— Reach the Atchafiilaya— En- 
gagement in the Rear, 143 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Cross the Atcha&laya— The Fleet and Army part Company —Morganza — 
Saw-mill Expedition— Up the River — Embark for Algiers —Serenade 
the lieutenant-colonel — Good-by to Louisiana, .... 150 

CHAPTER XV. 

Arrival at Fortress Monroe — Washington — Georgetown Heights— Mo- 
nocacy Junction — Up and down the Valley of the Shenandoah — Battle 
of Opequan Creek, 158 

CHAPTER XVI. 

The Pursuit — Congratulatory Order — Fisher's Hill — Gen. Emory- Mount 
Jackson —Mount Crawford — Cedar Creek — Build Breastworks — Sur- 
prise — Battle of Cedar Creek — Fall back to Keamstown — Martinsburg 
—Thanksgiving, .... 168 

CHAPTER XVn. 

Preparations for Winter — Log-huts — Break Camp — Winchester — Provost 
Duty — Baltimore — The Stables — Visit of Rev. Dr. Ware — Extracts 
from liCtters, • . . . . 178 

CHAPTER XVIH. 

Departure from Baltimore — Arrival at Savannah — Desolation of the City 

— Sherman be^ns his March through the Carolinas — Conflagration — 
Qen. Grover in Command of the Post — Music in the Park — Marching 
Orders, . . 190 

CHAPTER XIX. 

Hilton Head — Cape Fear River — Paroled Prisoners — Wilmington — More- 
head City — Newbem — Back to Morehead — Fatigue Duty «nd Oysters 

— An Alarm — Battle of Petersburg — All aboard for Goldsborough — 
Sherman's Army — Surrender of Lee — Assassination of the President 

— Surrender of Johnston — Morehead again — Transport — Rubber Cof- 
fee — Savannah, ..." 19r 



X CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XX. 

Change in Savannah — Southern Ladies and Clergy — Portion of the Brigade 
go to Augusta — Habits of the Country People — Jeff. Davis — Cos. 
and Q go to Darien — Arrival of First IMvision — Scarcity of Muster 
Rolls — Want of 'Transportation — Start for Home — Gallop's Island — 

Reception in Cambridge, 209 

IN MEMORIAM, 288 

ROLL OP REGIMENT, 242 



THE 



Story of the Thirty Eighth. 



CHAPTEE I. 

state of the country in the summer of 1862 — Call for six hundred thousand vol- 
unteers — The Thirty Eighth rendezvous at Lynnfield and West Cambridge 
—Visit of Cos. A, B, and F. to the City of Cambridge — Departure of the 
Regiment from the State — Passage through Philadelphia — Arrival at Bal- 
timore — Camp Belger. 



\4^ 




HE Thirty Eighth Regiment of Massachu- 
setts Volunteers was organized in the sum- 
mer of 1862, under the call, issued on the 
Ist of July, for three hundred thousand 
men to serve for three years. For a bet- 
tor understanding of the circumstances 
under which it was raised, a brief glance will be 
taken at the state of the country, and the feeling 
of the great body of the people in regard to the 
war. Prom the very beginning of the struggle, it 
was felt that Virginia was to be the scene of the se- 
verest conflicts ; and, consequently, the movements 
of the Army of the Potomac had attracted a large 

(1) 



2 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

share of public interest. That army, after a series 
of desperate battles, and an almost incredible 
amount of hardships, baffled in its attempts to 
capture the rebel capital, was recruiting its 
strength at Harrison's Landing. ^ The Union 
arms had been successful at various points in the 
West ; but the batteries of Vicksburg and of Port 
Hudson still kept the Mississippi sealed to the pasr 
sage of national vessels. Charleston and Savannah 
and Mobile boastingly bade defiance to the combined 
efforts of army and navy ; and the blockade-runners 
stole in and out between the ports of the Atlantic 
seaboard and foreign parts, supplying the enemy 
with the materials of war, — some of them per- 
forming their voyages with almost the regularity 
of packets. The Confederacy, notwithstanding its 
severe losses, elated at having checked a movement 
from which the North had anticipated so much, and 
their whole available resources, both of wealth and 
population, wielded by a few bold, determined lead- 
ers, looked confidently forward to the final success 
of their arms. Foreign powers talked of the Union 
as a thing of the past ; and even in the North, there 
were not wanting those, who, by word and deed, 
gave countenance to the foes of the country, and 
discouraged every loyal effort. 



KEW CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS. 3 

But neither defeat, mismanagement, foreign jeal- 
ousy, nor domestic treason, caused the President 
to swerve from his determination to restore the 
supremacy of the government over the whole coun- 
try. Availing, himself of the power granted him 
by the Constitution and by Congress, he had called 
three himdred thousand volunteers into the field 
for three years ; and, while each State was using 
all its energies in raising its quota, a new call was 
issued on the 4th of August for three hundred 
thousand volunteers for nine months. In Massa- 
chusetts, it seemed at first impossible to raise this 
additional force without resorting to a draft. But 
the towns vied with each other in filling their 
quotas. Public meetings were held; processions, 
with banners, and bands of music, paraded the 
streets ; patriotic songs were sung in the churches, 
and stirring appeals made from the pulpit; and 
liberal promises were made to care for friends left 
behind. 

The young men of Massachusetts responded 
promptly to the calls upon their patriotism. Leav- 
ing their counting-rooms, workshops, and studies, 
— with professions and trades half- learned, and 
business prospects broken up, — they went into the 
ranks, to undergo the hardships of a soldier's life. 



4 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

and submit themselves to an unaccustomed and 
often irksome discipline. 

Before the end of the year, Massachusetts had 
put twenty-one new regiments of infantry and sev- 
eral batteries into the field, beside sending a large 
number of recruits into all the old organizations. 
Among these regiments was the Thirty Eighth. 
Without claiming imdue merit for the motives or 
the deeds of the members of this regiment, or ex- 
alting them at the expense of other troops, it may 
be said that few of them enlisted without making 
pecuniary sacrifices to a greater or less extent ; 
and the local bounty of a hundred dollars did 
little more than provide them a comfortable out- 
fit, and purchase the numerous articles then con- 
sidered necessary for a soldier's comfort. 

The men composing the Tiiirty Eighth were 
gathered from various towns and counties ; and 
the majority of them were brought together for 
the first time upon their arrival at camp. Seven 
of the companies rendezvoused at Camp Stanton, 
Lynnfield, and three (Cambridge companies) at 
Camp Day, in North Cambridge. Owing to this 
division of the regiment, a little confusion ex- 
isted at first in regard to the letters by which 
the several companies should be designated; but 



ORGANIZATION. 

this matter was amicably settled upon the arrival 
or the regiment at Baltimore ; and, in speaking of 
the companies in this sketch, the letters by which 
they were finally known will be used entirely. 

Co. A was raised in Cambridgeport ; Co. B, prin- 
cipally in East Cambridge ; Co. C, in Abington ; Co. 
D, in various towns in Plymouth County ; Co. B, in 
Lynn ; Co. P, in Cambridgeport ; Co. G, in various 
parts of Plymouth County; Co. H, in New Bed- 
ford and Falmouth; Co. I, in Milton, Dedham, 
Medway, Wrentham, and other places ; and Co. K 
represented as many as fifteen cities and towns. 
In nearly all the companies there were men who 
belonged in places not mentioned here, as will be 
seen by the roster appended to this sketch. Al- 
though the regiment was thus collected from va- 
rious localities, harmony always prevailed. Com- 
mon dangers, common suflferings, and common 
triumphs, drew the members more closely to- 
gether as the numbers decreased ; and, when the 
final disbandment came, all separated with the 
most friendly feelings. 

As soon as the various town quotas were filled, 
they were sent into camp, and organized into com- 
panies and regiments. 

The recruits for the Thirty Eighth were under 
1* 



6 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

the command of Major D. K. Wardwell, who was 
commissioned lieutenant-colonel before leaving the 
State, and who enjoyed a high reputation for cour- 
age and practical military knowledge. Col. Ingra- 
ham, holding a commission at the time as lieuten- 
ant-colonel of the Eighteenth Massachusetts, had 
been commissioned for the Thirty Nhith;.but was* 
afterwards transferred to the Thirty Eighth. Upon 
the promotion of Major Wardwell, Capt. William 
L. Rodman, of Co. H, was commissioned to fill the 
vacancy. During the stay of the regiment at 
Lynnfield, many of the men were absent on fur- 
loughs, and new recruits were being constantly 
added, so that little progress was made in drill. 

While the seven companies were thus occupied 
at Lynnfield, Cos. A, B, and F were being intro- 
duced to military life £tt Camp Day, in North Cam- 
bridge. The camp at that time was crowded with 
recruits for the various regiments and batteries in 
the field ; and as the accommodations were lim- 
ited, the men of the Thirty Eighth were fiir- 
loughed nearly every night, reporting at simrise 
in the morning. 

Monday, Aug. 18, by invitation of the citizens of 
Cambridge, the volunteers visited that city. Dur- 
ing the afternoon, many of the places of business 



UNIFORMS ISSUED. 7 

were closed, flags were hoisted, and a procession, 
composed of delegates frojn the military and fire 
departments, the Cambridge and Irving Literary 
Associations, the printing-oflSces, and police, ac- 
companied by the city government and a numer- 
ous concourse of citizens, escorted tho volunteers 
through the principal streets of East Cambridge 
and Cambridgeport to the City Hall, where an ad- 
dress was delivered by the mayor ; and from thence 
to Williams Hall, where a fine collation was served. 

It had been expected that Cos. A, B, and P 
would join the regiment at Lynnfield, before leav- 
ing the State, and orders were daily looked for to 
that eflfect. But another course was pursued by 
the military authorities. The companies at Lynn- 
field were mustered into the United States service 
on the 21st, at that place. On the 22d, Capt. 
McLaughlin mustered in the Cambridge companies 
at Camp Day. 

When the army clothing was drawn, many 
amusing scenes took place. No. 1 men drew No. 
4 clothing, and vice versa. If a small man com- 
plained of an undue proportion of cloth in his 
coat, he was pleasantly assured by the issuing 
oflScer that it would shrink. Did a stout boy feel 
a pinching in the arms, — it would soon stretch 



8 THE STORY OF THE THIUTT EIGHTH. 

According to the style then prevalent, the new 
volunteers had cut their hair very short, showing 
the phrenological developments distinctly ; and 
when encased in army blue, their own mothers 
barely recognized them. Previously to their de- 
parture from Camp Day, the mothers, sisters, and 
friends of the volunteers visited the camp, armed 
with needles, thread, and scissors ; and the dropped 
stitches were taken up, shaky buttons made firm, 
pockets inserted, and blankets bound. Bach man 
was then furnished with a housewife, and all future 
repairing turned over to his clumsy fingers, proba- 
bly with many misgivings. 

The seven companies were furnished with arms 
and equipments at Lynnfield ; and, during the fore- 
noon of the 26th of August, the regimental line 
was formed, Lieut.-Col. Wardwell in command. 
The day was a hot one ; and, as the men had not 
yet acquired the art of packing knapsacks and 
wearing equipments to the best advantage, many 
of them were prostrated by the heat. They were 
transported in the cars to Boston, and marched 
across the city to the Worcester depot, where a 
special train was in readiness to take them. 
Cos. A, B, and F, not making their appearance 
at the appointed time, this portion of the regi- 



DEPARTURE FROM THE STATE. 9 

ment embarked at once, and proceeded on their 
way. 

In the meantime, Camp Day was all alive. 
The dinner was on the fire, when the orders to 
march were received. Hastily packing knapsacks, 
the three companies were soon in line. The citi- 
zens of Cambridge had provided horse-cars to con- 
vey them to Boston; but, in the first flush of 
military spirit, they voted to march. The knap- 
sacks, filled to overflowing with innumerable ar- 
ticles then considered essential to a soldier's well- 
being, bore heavily on the backs of the new 
recniits; and without arms and equipments, and 
not fully uniformed, the column had not a very 
military aspect as it marched down Main Street. 
Dusty and tired, the halt in Cambridgeport was 
a welcome one ; and justice was done to the col- 
lation provided by the city. 

Bidding the last good-bys, and followed by the 
good wishes of relatives and friends, the three- 
companies continued their march. Upon arriving; 
in Boston, it was found that Lieut.-Col. Wardwell 
had already started ; but, after a short delay, an- 
other train was made up, and the regiment over- 
taken at New London. Quarters were provided 
on the cabin floors of the steamer, and the blank- 



10 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

ets spread for the first time. The fatigue and 
excitement of the day brought a good night's 
rest, and every one awoke in the morning ro- 
fjreshed,; the decks being soon covered with 
men, enjoying the scenery of the river, as the 
steamer approached New York; while, from the 
cottages along the banks, loyal women waved a 
patriotic God-speed to the volunteers. 

Passing by New York, the regiment landed at 
Jersey City ; and there being a scarcity of trans- 
portation, a portion of the regiment did not get 
away until afternoon. The companies fi:om Camp 
Day had received no rations before leaving; and 
the crowd of hucksters, with which the place 
swarmed, reaped a rich harvest. Mr. J. C. Well- 
ington, of Cambridge, came on with the regiment, 
and one company was indebted to him for a boun- 
tiful supply of hot ^coffee, — the first of a series of 
kindnesses conferred upon that company and the 
regiment, when in garrison and field, which made 
his presence always a welcome one. 

While waiting at Jersey City, the famous Sixty 
Ninth New York arrived at the depot, on their 
return from their second term of service. These 
real soldiers, who had actually been in battle, were 
looked upon with much interest by the imtried 



RIDE THROUGH NEW JERSEY. 11 

volunteers who were on their way to the scene of 
action, and the contrast between the appearance 
of the two sets of knapsacks was a suggestive one. 
Taking the train vacated by the Sixty Ninth, the 
rear of the regiment was soon riding on after the 
advance. All through New Jersey, people on the 
roadside and in the fields cheered, while flags and 
handkerchiefs were waved from the houses. The 
men were in excellent spirits, and enlivened the 
journey with songs and mirth. Getting passing 
glimpses of Newark, Burlington, Princeton, Tren- 
ton, and other historic cities, now invested with 
renewed interest, and being liberally supplied with 
water whenever the train stopped long enough, the 
regiment rode through New Jersey, arriving at 
Camden about eight in the evening. Crossing 
the ferry, they were taken to the Cooper Shop 
Refreshment Saloon, where they partook of a 
bountiful collation, and were then conducted to a 
long row of wash-basins provided for the purpose. 
After the hot and dusty ride, the ablution was 
peculiarly refreshing, and was greatly enjoyed. 
Again forming in line, the regiment marched 
across the city to the Baltimore depot. 

Although the passing of troops was now a daily 
occurrence, the enthusiasm of the people did not 



12 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

abate. Ladies waved their handkerchiefs from the 
windows, and even grasped the hands of the pass- 
ing soldiers from the doorsteps, while men crowded 
the sidewalks, and heartily cheered. This enthusi- 
astic greeting will long be remembered by the sur- 
vivors of that column ; for it was far more cordial 
and earnest than the welcome given them in the 
capital of their own State, when after three years' 
toil and battle, with thinned ranks, but with an 
unstained record, they again marched through the 
streets of Boston. Notwithstanding the great num- 
ber of troops that had passed through Philadelphia 
that summer, the hospitality of the city never 
wearied. No regiment was allowed to pass un- 
cared for ; and when returning wounded and sick 
from the front, singly or in groups, the same kind 
feelings were manifested, and the warm-hearted 
ladies with their own hands administered the deli- 
cacies their generosity had provided. Other North- 
em cities cared well for the passing volunteers; 
but none equalled Philadelphia, whose efforts 
were continued as well in seasons of defeat and 
gloom as in those of victory and triumph. 

Taking the cars after midnight, the regiment ar- 
rived at Baltimore about ten o'clock, the next day, 
and marched over nearly the same route taken by 



. CAMP BEL GBR. 13 

the Massachusetts Sixth, on the 19th of April, 1861. 
No noisy mob appeared to dispute the passag6 up 
Pratt Street ; but the sullen, averted looks of the 
majority of the people on the sidewalks betokened 
no love for the Union. A substantial dinner was 
furnished the regiment at the Union Relief Rooms 
(for Baltimore had Unionists, whose devotion to 
the country was as intense as was their hatred to 
Secession) ; and it was then learned, that, instead 
of going to Washington, and thence on to Virginia, 
the regiment was to occupy a camp in the vicinity 
of Baltimore, about to be vacated by the Thirty 
Seventh New York, whose term of service had ex- 
pired. A march of a few miles led to the camp- 
ing-ground, — a pretty place, in a grove of trees, 
formerly known as Druid Hill Park, then called 
Camp Belger. There were good facilities for 
bathing near the camp ; while the shade -trees 
furnished cool retreats when ofif drill. On the 
30th, the gims and equipments for Cos. A, B, and 
F were received and distributed ; and the day was 
spent in fitting them. 

On the 3d of September, Col. Ingraham arrived 
to take command of the regiment. The greater 
portion of the time was now occupied in drilling. 
Col. Ingraham and Lieut.-Col. Wardwell were both 

2 



14 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

thoroughly versed in military tactics ; and the com- 
pany-oflBcers seconded their efforts in endeavoring 
to bring the regiment up to a high standard, in 
the manual of arms and in marching. Adjutant 
Loring kept a sharp look-out for the whereabouts 
of every button, and the polish of every shoe, on 
parade; and the surgeons enforced a strict atten- 
tion to the rules of health and cleanliness in the 
quarters, and about the camp-ground. Thus the 
regiment was fairly started on its military career. 
What this training resulted in may perhaps be 
gathered from the following pages. 

On the 5th of September, Co. K was detailed to 
guard Stuart's hospital ; and, as it marched out 
of the camp, its appearance showed the improve- 
ment that had already taken place in military 
bearing. Sept. 7, Mr. Stacy Read, arrived in the 
camp with parcels for the Cambridge companies, 
showing that the folks at home had not yet forgot- 
ten the absent ones ; and as Mr. Read had mani- 
fested great interest in Co. P, that company, by 
unanimous vote, adopted the name of "Read 
Guard." 




CHAPTER II. 



Leave Belger — Visit of Baltimore Ladies — Camp Cram — Religious Services — 
Drills — Band — Marching Orders — Camp Emory — Return of Co.. K to 
Raiment — Cold Weather — Departure from Emory — Take Transports — 
Fortress Monroe — Target Shooting — Washing iu Salt Creek. 



jJN the 8th of September, orders came for 
the regiment to pack up, and be ready to 
march on the following morning. Rations 
were cooked, ammunition dealt out, and 
the tents struck and packed, Co. F remain- 
ing behind to guard the camp. Owing to 
a mistake of the guide, the regiment marched a 
number of miles out of its way, causing unneces- 
sary fatigue. 

Co. P marched up the next day. Before leaving 
Camp Belger, this company was visited by some 
Union ladies from Baltimore, who regaled them 
with roast meat, peaches, tomatoes, and biscuits. 

The new camp, called Camp Cram, was about 
seven miles from Baltimore, near the village of 
Powhattan, and in a position to guard the Liberty 
turnpike. The rebels were then threatening Mary- 
land with a large force ; and strict orders were is- 

(15) 



16 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

sued regarding vigaance on guard and picket, and 
the importance of keeping a sharp look-out for 
spies. One day, a vigilant sentinel seized a sus- 
picious-looking personage, and brought him to the 
oflBcer of the guard. He proved to be a Baltimore 
clergyman, and preached to the regiment the fol- 
lowing Sunday. 

The tents were . pitched on a rising ground, 
shaded by large trees. In front of the camp, the 
ground sloped down to the Powhattan Creek ; and 
the battalion drills up and down this declivity 
developed the muscles of the men, who were then 
little aware of the need they should have of good, 
stout limbs to carry them through the pine woods 
of Louisiana. 

The regiment having no chaplain, religious ser- 
vices were performed on the Sabbath by Col. 
Ligraham, according to the Episcopal usage ; and 
social reUgious meetings were conducted by Private 
Mudge, of Co. E. The Sabbath services were at- 
tended by citizens from the surrounding country, 
and they usually stopped to see the parade. Some 
of the companies had not been furnished with uni- 
form pants in Massachusetts, and as it was a good 
while before any could be procured, it may be 
imagined that these necessary articles of apparel 



FORMATION OP A BAND. 17 

began to show signs of wear, and it required some 
manoeuvring on the part of line ofl&cers to get pre- 
sentable men in the front rank. Any other view 
of the regiment on one of these parades might 
not have added to its reputation. When the new 
pants arrived, they were received with a round of 
cheers. 

A thorough system of drills began at Camp 
Cram, — squad, company, battalion, and skirmish ; 
and, at the close of those warm October days, the 
arbitrary "taps" fell on willing ears. The skir- 
mish drills were conducted by Lieut.-Col. Ward- 
well, and were a relief to the monotony of the 
battalion and company drill. 

The subject of a band had been agitated in the 
regiment from the time of their first going into 
camp; and measures had been taken to procure 
instruments. They were received during the last 
week in September, and tlie band made their first 
appearance on parade, Saturday, Sept. 27. This 
attraction drew an increased number of visitors 
from the surrounding country, especially on the 
Sabbath ; and the camp was enlivened by the pres- 
ence of country dames, in their holiday attire, who, 
during the week^ had done a thriving business in 
selling pies and apple-butter to the soldiers. Co 

2* 



18 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

K, in the meantime, having performed the duty 
required of them very acceptably, had returned to 
the regiment, with an improvement in drill which 
caused increased emulation among the other com- 
panies, and raised the standard of military acquire- 
ments still higher in the command. 

While the Thirty Eighth were thus acquiring 
proficiency in drill, and inuring themiselves to life 
in the. open air, stirring scenes were being enacted 
within cannon sound. The distant boom of the 
guns at Antietam were heard in camp ; and orders 
were looked for every day, which would send the 
regiment to the fSront. One gallant Massachusetts 
regiment (the Thirty Fifth), that had left the State 
but a few days previous to the Thirty Eighth, had 
already been in the thick of the fight, and had lost 
heavily. 

In a few weeks, the tide of war again* rolled 
northwards, and the troops of Stonewall threatened 
Pennsylvania. On the 11th of October, the Thirty 
Eighth received orders to be ready to move the 
next day. Tired of the monotony of camp-life, 
the news was received joyously; and the camp 
rang with the shouts of those to whom the un- 
known perils of the battle-field had a strange fas- 
cination. , Ear into the night, busy hands were 



MARCH TO BALTIMORE. 19 

at work packing knapsacks; and many an article 
which kind but inexperienced friends at home had 
considered indispensable to their soldier-boy's com- 
fort was left behind. 

Early Sunday morning, Oct. 12, the regiment 
broke camp, and began the march toward Balti- 
more. No one would haye recognized this body 
of drilled soldiers, with neatly packed knapsacks, 
marching with steady step and closed ranks, as 
the procession of awkward recruits who passed 
through the same streets less than six weeks pre- 
viously ; and in after times, when disease and bat- 
tle had reduced them to a remnant, the survivors 
of the column looked sadly back in memory upon 
that October morning, when the long line followed 
its commander over the Maryland hills. 

Marching through the city of Baltimore, the 
regiment took the cars for Chambersburg, but had 
not proceeded a mile, when the orders were coun- 
termanded, the train called back, and the troops 
disembarked. Quarters were procured in the ma- 
chine-shops for the night ; and the next morning, 
aflber breakfasting at the Union Relief Rooms, the 
regiment marched to Camp Emory, on the out- 
skirts of the city, on property owned by the rela- 
tives of Charles Carroll, of Revolutionary fame. 



20 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

The One Hundred and Twenty Eighth New York 
had been encamped on a part of the ground, but 
had gone to Chambersburg, leaving a lofty flag- 
Btafif and a pile of boards for tent-floors, both of 
wliich were appropriated at once by the Thirty 
Eighth; but upon the return of the former regi- 
ment, the flagstaff was returned, and a loftier one 
procured, which was afterwards transferred to the 
One Hundred and Fiftieth New York. 

The old routine of drill was now resumed. Col. 
Emory commanded the division to which the Thirty 
Eighth was assigned; and the men here first saw 
the stout old soldier who afterwards became such a 
favorite leader. 

On the 28th of October, an order came from 
Gen. Wool for one company to go to Baltimore 
on special service. Co. F went through the city 
on the double-quick, with loaded muskets and 
fixed bayonets; but their services were not re- 
quired, and they came back to camp rather dis- 
gusted at having added nothing new to the fame 
of the regiment. It was rumored in the camp, 
that some one had insulted the hostler of a gen- 
eral, and a squadron of cavalry and a body of in- 
fantry were ordered out to avenge it. 

While at Camp Emory, the regiment received a 



MARCHING ORDERS. 21 

visit from the Rev, Mr. Ware, of Cambridge, a 
gentleman who always manifested great interest 
in its welfare, and whose kindness will long be re- 
membered by its members. 

In this camp, the . companies drilled daily in 
" reversed arms," for the purpose of attending the 
funeral of some officer who had died, or was ex- 
pected to die. But their services were never called 
for ; and it became one of the regimental legends 
that the oflBcer had refused to die upon hearing 
that the Thirty Eighth were drilling for the pur- 
pose of burying him. 

Toward the end of October, the weather began 
to get cool, and every one looked uneasily forward 
to a winter in tents in Maryland ; but as a new well 
was almost completed, and a new guard-house be- 
gun, the men still had hopes of getting away. 
Col. Ingraham was now acting brigade-command- 
er, and Lieut.-Col. Wardwell in conunand of the 
regiment; and brigade and division drills took 
place several times a week. 

During the first week in November, marching 
orders were received, and preparations were made 
to embark on ocean transports ; but the regiment 
did not break camp until Sunday, the 9th. A few 
days previous, there had been a severe snow-storm, 



22 THE STOET OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

which would have done honor to Massachusetts; 
and every one was eager to get into a warmer 
climate. Just before the cold weather, Mr. Well- 
ington, of Cambridge, had visited the camp, and 
furnished each of the members of Co. P with a 
pair of gloves, a present from Mr. Stacy Read. 
The band of the One Hundred and Fiftieth New 
York escorted the regiment through the streets of 
Baltimore to the Union Relief Rooms, where a good 
meal was furnished them. Quarters for the night 
were found in unoccupied houses; and the next 
day the regiment was taken down Chesapeake Bay 
in small steamers, and transferred to the steamship 
Baltic, which had been selected by Gen. Emory as 
his flag-ship. The ship stopped a short time oflf 
Annapolis to take on board two companies of the 
One Hundred and Thirty First New York, and 
then proceeded to Fortress Monroe, arriving at 
Hampton Roads on the morning of the 8th. 

The victories of.Farragut had not yet added 
their brilliant record to the achievements of our 
navy ; and the scene of the little " Monitor's " vic- 
tory, and of the " Cumberland's " glorious death, 
was eagerly studied, while one of the officers, who 
had been an eye-witness to the engagement, re- 
lated the story to a group of interested listeners. 



WASHING IN SALT WATJEB. 23 

For nearly a month, the regiment remained on 
shipboard at Hampton Roads, occasionally going 
on shore to practice target -shooting and to drill. 
An amusing incident occurred at this time, the 
memory of which will bring a smile to many a 
face. There had been no facilities for washing 
clothes since leaving Camp Emory, and the regi- 
ment had not yet roughed it long enough to be- 
come accustomed to dirt; so one day, when it 
was announced that the knapsacks were to be 
taken on shore, and an opportunity given to wash 
clothes in fresh water, soap became in demand, 
and all anticipated one more cleaning up before 
going into the field. A tiresome march through 
the streets of Old Point Comfort, by the " contra- 
band " village rising around the chimneys of 
ruined Hampkk, brought the regiment to the 
vicinity of a creek ; and soon the bank was lined 
with busy washers. But the soap furnished by 
Uncle Samuel had no eflfect upon the dirt con- 
tracted on his transports. Suddenly some one 
discovered that the creek was a salt-water one. 
The washing fever subsided, and the regiment 
went back wiser, but very little cleaner. 

Day after day slipped by, and still there was no 
movement. On the 18th of the month, the regi- 



24 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

ment received their first visit from the paymaster, 
being paid ofi* on the deck of the ship. The com- 
panies changed quarters more than once on board 
the " Baltic," and had the opportunity to test the 
comparative hardness of nearly all the beams in 
the ship. It required skill in gynmastics to go 
from the bunks to the deck without coming in 
contact with some animate or inanimate body. 

Thanksgiving Day found the regiment still at 
anchor, waiting. The men went on shore in the 
morning, and had the liberty of the beach and of 
the sutlers' stores until afternoon. Many had 
received "boxes" from home; and turkeys and 
puddings graced impromptu tables, spread on the 
beach, the fresh sea-breeze giving a flavor supe- 
rior to any gravy. Those whose boxes did not ar- 
rive in time picked up a dinner in| private houses, 
saloons, and at the counters of the sutlers, who 
were liberally patronized, and who long remem- 
bered the Thirty Eighth. 

At length, the " horses came on board," and the 
signs of departure seemed to multiply. Lieut.- 
Col. Wardwell resigned before the regiment left 
Fortress Monroe ; and his resignation was accepted, 
to take efiect from Dec. 3. Major Rodman suc- 
ceeded to the vacant lieutenant-colonelcy, to date 



PROMOTIONS. 26 

from Dec. 4 ; and Capt. Richardson, of Co. A, was 
promoted major. The two companies of the One 
Hundred and Thirty First had been transferred to 
another ship, and the Thirty Eighth had the Baltic 
to themselves. 




CHAPTEE III. 

Departure from Fortress Monroe — Sea-yoyage — Arrival at Ship Island — Christ- 
mas Day— Embark for New Orleans — Up the Mississippi — Land at Car- 
rollton — Camp Kearney — Col. Ingraham in command of Brigade— Pla- 
qnemine Expedition — Unpleasant Duty — Break Campi preparatoiy to 
taking the Field. . 

I HURSDAY morning, Dec. 8, everything was 
astir in Hampton Roads. Important little 
tug-boatt? sputtered and whistled ; quarter- 
masters' boats brought oflF their last supplies 
of fresh bread and meat ; and tardy officers 
joined tlieir regiments. About nine o'clock, 
A. M., the Atlantic weighed anchor, and led the 
way to sea, followed, at intervals, by the Ericcs- 
son, the Spaulding, the Arago, the Pocahontas, 
and others of the fleet. Slowly steaming between 
Fortress Monroe and the Rips Raps, their decks 
covered with troops, and their flags blowing out 
clear in the fresh breeze, the ships presented a 
fine sight. About four o'clock, the Baltic weighed 
anchor, and followed the fleet, the gunboat Au- 
gusta bringing up the rear, as convoy. Of course, 
the destination was the great theme, and rumors 

(26) 



ARRIVAL AT SHIP ISLAND. 27 

flew thick and fast, but nothing definite was 
learned. 

The weather was very beautiful; and the men 
thronged the deck, reading, writing, and watch- 
ing the niovements of the strange fishes and birds 
which occasionally made their appearance. There 
was comparatively little sea-sickness, and the gen- 
eral health of the regiment was good. The cook- 
ing facilities were poor. The galley^in which cofiee 
was boiled, and salt-beef cooked for a thousand 
men, was of the smallest proportions ; and those 
who went through that voyage have a vivid re- 
membrance of " big Charlie " bending over the 
meat-boiler. Notwithstanding the inconveniences, 
there was little grumbling ; and the division com- 
mander expressed himself well pleased at the or- 
derly conduct of the men. Charleston, Pensacola, 
and Mobile were passed, and still the ship kept on 
her course. At length, the appearance of a large 
fleet, hovering around a low island, told that the 
destination was reached. The place of rendezvous 
proved to be .Ship Island, much to the disgust of 
the regiment, who had conceived a strong dislike 
against this place. In truth, it looked as if a large 
wave might wash the whole concern, with its mili- 
tary storehouses and fort, into the Gulf of Mexico. 



28 THE STORY OP TOE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Here it was learned that New Orleans was the 
destination; and, as the Baltic drew too much 
water to cross the bar off the mouth of the Missis- 
sippi, the Thirty Eighth had to land on the island, 
and await the return of some of the lighter draft 
transports. Part of the regiment disembarked on 
the evening of the 13th, and the remainder fol- 
lowed the next day ; glad enough to be once more 
on terra firmaj if this sand-bank could be so de- 
nominated. Although near midwinter, the temper- 
ature was mild ; and the beach was soon covered 
with bathers, enjoying the luxury of a good plunge 
in the water after such a long sea-service. There 
was no chance to be dirty while here. Tin dippers 
and plates shone with a lustre that would have ex- 
cited the admiration of a Knickerbocker housewife ; 
and the muskets were bright and polished. The 
sand was everywhere, and must have assisted the 
stomach wonderfully in digesting the antediluvian 
hard-tack occasionally issued. 

There was a good deal of fatigue work to do 
here, unloading stores, and transporting ammuni- 
tion ; and even the drilling through the sand was 
unusually fatiguing. At this time, there was a 
number of political prisoners on the island, render- 
ing service to the government, and strengthening 



CHRISTMAS. 29 

their own muscles, by pounding stones. Some of 
them had been prominent citizens in New. Orleans, 
and had been banished to this place, by order of 
Gen. Butler, for acts of disloyalty to the Union. 
The soldiers of the Thirty Eighth looked upon 
these persons as " the right men in the right 
place," and cordially endorsed the policy of " Old 
Ben." 

A number of the larger transpoits had been un- 
able to cross the bar ; and the island was dotted 
with canvas villages. Drilling was resumed by 
the various regiments, and prosecuted vigorously, 
although the marching in the sand was fatiguing. 
Christmas was now near at hand. On the even- 
ing of the 23d, after brigade drill, the colonel ad- 
dressed the regiment briefly, statmg that they 
would probably spend Christmas there, and that 
he wished them to enjoy the day as well as they 
could under the circumstances. The camp was 
to be given up to the regiment from ten o'clock, 
A. M., till "tattoo;" they were to elect their own 
field, staflF, and line officers ; make their own camp- 
regulations, and hold the regimental officers to a 
strict observance of them, punishing any violation 
of them with confinement in the guard -house. 
The men entered into the proposal with spirit. 

8» 



80 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Committees were appointed from tlie different 
companies, line officers elected ; and the camp 
scoured for materials with which to get up a 
mock parade. Santa Claus did not make his ap- 
pearance. The jolly old saint, in his fur cap, 
would have been sadly out of place in that sunny 
clime. One poor fellow, in a fit of absent-mind- 
edness, hung up his stocking in his tent, but in- 
dignantly rejected the idea that the army pastry 
found therein was from the old friend of his boy- 
hood. He thought the other " Nick " ^had more 
dealings with the commissary department. The 
day opened with a good breakfast of baked beans. 
After breakfast, the regiment was drawn up around 
the colonel's tent, when the Christmas service of 
the Episcopal Church was read by Col. Ingraham, 
the band and a volunteer choir assisting in mak- 
ing the service interesting. The camp was then 
" turned over " to the regiment, the colonel hold- 
ing the power in reserve to check the proceedings 
if they became disorderly. The regular guard be- 
ing relieved, a new guard and police detail was at 
once made out, selected from the ranks of the 
commissioned and non-commissioned officers. In 
the forenoon, a burlesque dress-parade took place, 
which furnished much amusement to all con- 



CHRISTMAS. 31 

oemed; and, considering the limited materials on 
the island, was quite successful. Tlie series of 
orders read by the adjutant's clerk were Blightly 
personal, and good-humoredly embodied the com- 
plaints of the men against certain obnoxious 
changes in the drill, and regarding other regi- 
mental matters.. During the day, the officers 
were nearly all under arrest' for some violation of 
the " orders of the day." One Timothy Ingraham 
was taken to the guard -house for attempting to 
leave camp without a pass. Giving a satisfactory 
excuse, he was released. Other officers were not 
as fortunate ; and some of them worked out the 
penalty of their oflFences with the shovel. The 
Christmas dinner consisted of a bountiful supply 
of salt-beef and hard-tack, washed down with cold 
water. The afternoon was spent in rambling over 
the island, each one enjoying himself in his own 
way. About five o'clock, a dress-parade took 
place, conducted exclusively by enlisted men, 
each company doing its best to make the parade 
creditable. The officers loaned their uniforms for 
the occasion to those selected to command the regi- 
ment and companies ; and they acknowledged that 
the reputation for drill which the regiment enjoyed 
at this time did not suflFer during the temporary 



82 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

transfer of authority. During the evening, some 
amusing court-martials took place ; but, as it is not 
the purpose of the writer of this sketch to " tell 
tales out of school," the mere mention of it will be 
sufficient to bring the scene before the minds of 
tliose who participated in the events of the day. 
" Tattoo " dissolved the spell. The companies fell 
in for roll-call, the guard went on again, and short- 
ly after nine o'clock, the lights were all out, and 
perfect quiet reigned in the camp. Nothing oc- 
curred during the entire day to mar the peacefal- 
ness of the festival. There had been no quarrel- 
ling, no drunkenness, and no infraction of military 
rule. 

On the evening of the 28th, the long-looked for 
transports made their appearance. There was an 
immediate inspection of knapsacks ; but personal 
property had dwindled down to a small compass, 
and there were few articles to be left behind. The 
cooks were busy all night preparing rations; and 
orders were given to be ready to start at ten in the 
morning. At noon, the tents were struck; but 
there being a large amount of commissary stores 
to put on board, the regiment did not embark till 
midnight; those not on duty grouped around 
tKe camp-fires, " laying up sleep " for the future. 



UP THE MISSISSIPPI. 33 

As the regiment inarched to the wharf, the band 
played " Yankee Doodle," bringing many of Gen. 
Butler's proteges to the doors and windows of their 
quarters. Embarking on the transport Northern 
Light, — a large California packet-steamer, much 
better adapted to convey troops comfortably than 
the majority of government vessels, — the men 
gladly sought their canvas- bottom bunks; and 
about sunrise, on the morning of the 30th, the 
steamship weighed anchor, and steered for New 
Orleans. Although the residence on the island 
had not been an unpleasant one, none were sorry 
to see its outlines fade in the distance, or wished 
to revisit it. On the morning of the 31st, the ship 
crossed the bar, and entered the Mississippi; few 
on board then anticipating the long months that 
were to pass before their eyes would be gladdened 
by the sight of the blue water again. The sail up 
the Mississippi on this last day of the year was an 
interesting one to Northern eyes. The large plan- 
tations of corn and cane, dotted over with negroes, 
looking like so many charred stumps on a partially 
cleared field; the orange -trees laden with fruit; 
the mansions of the wealthy planters, half hidden 
by fresh -looking shrubbery; the rows of neat, 
white-washed negro cabins; the tall chimneys of 



84 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

the sugar-mills in the rear ; with the back-ground 
of forest -trees, gray with the Spanish moss, — 
formed a picture in striking contrast to the win- 
ter-scenery the northern-bred volunteers had been 
accustomed to. 

Two sunkem gun-boats near Forts Philip and 
Jackson reminded the Thirty Eighth that they 
were in the same department with " old Farra- 
gut," and that, in any co-operation between the 
land and sea forces, the army would have to look 
to its laurels. On the way up the river, another 
transport was passed, containing the Forty Seventh 
Massachusetts ; and the two regiments exchanged 
friendly greetings. Being the last day of the 
month, the regular inspection and muster took 
place on the deck of the steamer ; and, to show 
the good health of the regiment on entering the 
Department of the Gulf, it may be stated that one 
company, which left Boston over four months pre- 
viously with ninety -five enlisted men, mustered 
ninety-one for inspection, — four having been left 
behind, sick, at Fortress Monroe. 

A little after dark, the long line of lights 
was seen glimmering on the river-edge, marking 
the outlines of New Orleans. The steamer cast 
anchor in the stream near the upper part of the 



CAMP AT CARROLLTON. 35 

city ; and the deck was soon deserted by all except 
the guard, who paced their beats, " watching " the 
old year out, and the new year in. 

At noon, the ship steamed up the river to Car- 
rollton, one of the suburban towns of New Orleans, 
where the regiment landed. It was the first day 
of January ; but the orange-trees were in bloom, 
the roses perfumed the air, and the vegetables 
were growing vigorously. This was the " Sunny 
South" indeed. The new camp had at one 
time been occupied by rebel troops, and was well 
adapted for drilling. On one side of the Thirty 
Eighth, the One Hundred and Sixteenth New 
York were encamped, and, on the other side, the 
One Hundred and Seventy Fifth ; beyond which, 
were the Forty Seventh Massachusetts. Between 
the Thirty Eighth and the One Hundred and Six- 
teenth, a friendship sprung up, which lasted dur- 
ing the entire term of service ; and although the 
One Hundred and Sixteenth were soon transferred 
to another brigade, and afterward to another di- 
vision, whenever the two regiments met on a cam- 
paign, friendly greetings were exchanged; and 
this, notwithstanding the fact that they were 
rivals, each aspiring to take the lead in drill and 
efficiency. 



86 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

While at CarroUton, Col. Ingraham took com- 
mand of a brigade, and never rejoined the regi- 
ment. He participated in the first part of the 
Tdche campaign ; but, being unable to endure field 
service in the climate of Louisiana, was appointed 
Provost Marshal at Washington, in which position 
he gave such satisfaction that he was retained in 
service by special order after the regiment was 
mustered out, and brevetted as brigadier-general. 
A few days after arriving at CarroUton, the regi- 
ment experienced its first Louisiana rain-storm. 
The camp-ground was soon intersected by minia- 
ture bayous ; and, as the drains were not in good 
order, some of the streets were completely flooded ; 
while the tents, being old, afforded but little shelter 
from the storm. The company streets, after one 
of these winter-rains, were like so many mortar- 
beds. Much has been written about the Virginia 
mud, in connection with the Army of the Potomac ; 
but, if it equalled that of Louisiana, the face of the 
country in that part of Virginia must have been 
greatly changed by the movements of the armies ; 
and the mixing of soil will afford matter for study 
for, future agriculturists. As soon as the regiment 
was fairly settled in camp, drills were resumed 
with vigor. During the stay on Ship Island, the 



VISIT OP GEN. BANKS. 37 

manual of arms had been changed : the old system 
was now restored, much to the satisfaction of the 
men. On the 6th of the month, Gen. Banks, ac- 
companied by Grens. T. W. Sherman and Emory, 
Tisited the camp. The regiment was engaged in 
battalion drill, at the time; and, as the visitors 
approached, were drawn up into line to receive 
them. Then, the Thirty Eighth, as far as re- 
garded appearance, were in their prime. Disease 
had not yet thinned the ranks ; four months' 
drill, under competent field and line officers, had 
brought them to a high standard in the manual 
of arms and in battalion movements ; Adjutant 
Loring had paid particular attention to the per- 
sonal neatness of the men ; and the men were not 
yet discouraged by those gloomy accounts which 
afterward came from the North, shovring a want 
of faith in the ability of the army to put down 
the rebellion, and an unwillingness to strengthen 
it by reinforcements of good men. As spring 
drew near, the camp was full of rumors in re- 
gard to the coming campaign; and three days' 
rations were kept cooked most of the time. 

At midnight, on the 11th, sudden orders came 
to "fall in" for sixty rounds of cartridges each; 
to pack knapsacks, and put two days' rations in the 



88 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

haversacks. It was rumored that the rebels operat- 
ing up the river had been largely reinforced by 
troops from Richmond, under Longstreet, and 
that the Thirth Eighth were to join the main 
body of the Army of the Gulf. The knapsacks 
were to be packed, and left behind, and the camp 
left standing, the troops going into the field in 
light marching order. After waiting until the 
middle of the forenoon, the orders were counter- 
manded, the extra cartridges returned, and drill 
resumed. 

On the 24th of January, the Thirty First Massa- 
chusetts, Col. Gooding, who had been doing duty 
at the f6rts, arrived, and went into camp near the 
Thirty Eighth, Col. Gooding taking command of 
the brigade. At this time, brick ovens were built 
in the camp, and the regiment had their baked 
beans regularly Sunday mornings. 

During the first week in February, the division 
drilled together at Camp Parapet, near CarroUton. 
On the 3d, the One Hundred and Sixteenth struck 
tents, and marched off in the direction of Baton 
Rouge ; and, in a few days, their camp was occu- 
pied by the Fifty Third Massachusetts, — a nine- 
months' regiment, who were in the third brigade 
until their term of service expired. 



EXPEDITION TO PLAQUBMINE. 39 

On the morning of the 10th of February, the 
knapsacks were again packed preparatory to a 
move ; but the tents were left standing, and the 
camp put in charge of the light-duty men, of 
which there were then a large number. 

When the regiment first arrived at CarroUton, 
the general health was unusually good ; but the 
change in the water, the dampness of the low land, 
and the frequent guard-duty had made their mark, 
and thinned the ranks. 

It was nearly dark before the regiment embarked 
on the first of the numerous river-boats with which 
they afterward became so familiar. A thick fog 
came up during the night ; and, in the morning, 
the boat was found to be snugly moored to the 
river-bank, near a large plantation, the mansion 
house being then occupied as ^a signal-station; 
but the fog cleared up during the forenoon, and 
the boat proceeded on her voyage. The sail 
was a pleasant one, and was greatly enjoyed ; and, 
as the river had risen since the arrival of the 
regiment at New Orleans, it presented a nobler 
appearance than at that time. Plantation after 
plantation stretched along the banks, on both sides 
of the river ; but few of them showed any signs of 
activity. The residences of many of the planters 



40 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

indicated taste and refinement ; and, in some in- 
stances, the negro cabins had a very attractive and 
picturesque appearance. These plantations may 
have belonged to men of the St. Clare school ; but 
no Evas were seen sporting among the roses, or 
Uncle Toms " keeping an eye on things." During 
the afternoon, Jefferson College was passed, and, 
still later, a large convent, prettily situated near 
the river, with grounds tastefully laid out. About 
midnight, the boat arrived at Plaquemine, an old- 
fashioned, dilapidated looking town, but which is 
said to have been a thriving place before the rebel- 
lion, when the Mississippi was covered with steam- 
ers, and the products of the cotton and cane-fields 
were filling the coffers of the plantation princes. 
The few citizens who remained had evidently not 
lost their hope of the ultimate success of the 
South; for Confederate paper was worth half as 
much as greenbacks. 

Sunday afternoon, Feb. 15, the Louisiana Belle 
arrived at Plaquemine, having on board Gen. 
Emory and staff"; and she was soon followed by 
another boat, with the One Hundred and Fifty 
Sixth New- York, and Col. Ingraham and staff". A 
gun-boat started with them, but broke down on the 
way, and put back for repairs. A portion of the 



PLAQUEMINE. 41 

Thirty Eighth being on the upper deck of the 
transport, and exposed to the weather, quarters 
were procured for Cos. C and P in unoccupied 
houses on shore. It was after dark when they 
landed, and raining hard. The mud was knee- 
deep in the streets, and the night pitchy dark. 
After floundering along for half an hour or more, 
it turned out that the guide had lost his way, and 
the two companies had to countermarch, and re- 
trace their steps part of the way. In after times, 
many a laugh was had over the misfortunes of that 
night ; but, at the time, Mr. Webster and Mr. 
Worcester would have been astonished at the capar 
bilities of the English language in furnishing ex- 
pletives. Finally, the house that had been selected 
for quarters was found ; and all except the unlucky 
guards were soon oblivious of the mishaps of mili- 
tary life. Afterward, several of the remaining 
companies were transferred to quarters in the town. 

The regiment drilled, as usual, at Plaquemine ; 
and the men often wondered when that lazy sol- 
dier-life they had heard so much about was going 
to begin ; for, hitherto, with drill, guard-duty, 
fatigue, and rifle-cleaning, they barely had time to 
answer their letters from home. 

In the meantime, the gun-boat had arrived ; and 

4* 



42 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

a number of men acquainted with boat-service had 
been detailed from the regiment, and sent up the 
Bayou Plaquemine in launches, on a reconnoitring 
expedition. While awaiting the return of the 
boats, the sugar-houses in the vicinity were visited, 
and candy-making became the order of the even- 
ings. In the succeeding months, the molasses- 
candy expedition was often recalled, and its inci- 
dents talked of over the camp and picket fires. 

The reconnoitring party returned with the infor- 
mation that the bayou was completely obstructed 
by piles and immense drifts of logs, and that it 
would be impossible to force a passage through. 
In consequence of this report, the troops again 
embarked, and the transport headed down the 
river, reaching the landing at CarroUton at six 
o'clock on the evening of the 19th. In the 
morning, the march was taken up for Camp Kear- 
ney, where everything was found in order, although 
the camp bore evidence of having been pretty well 
flooded by the rains of the previous week. A mail 
had arrived during the absence of the regiment, 
and it had been sent up the river, to the disap- 
pointment of every one. Numerous absurd rumors 
concerning disaster to the regiment had been 
brought down the river, and one had found its way 



" A DAT OF REST." 43 

into the New Orleans papers, to the efiFect that 
nine companies of the Thirty Eighth had been cap- 
tured. Acting upon this information, the sutler 
had packed up his wares, and gone to another regi- 
ment, concluding that his chances of money-mak- 
ing in the Thirty Eighth were at an end. 

Immediately upon arriving in camp again, the 
tents were struck, and the floors taken up, that 
the sun might dry up the dampness. On Sunday, 
Feb. 22, diviae service was performed in the camp 
by Col. Ingraham, the band, and a select choir 
from the ranks, assisting ; and the day was further 
honored by the firing of a national salute from 
Camp Parapet. 

On the 26th, by the advice of the surgeon, the 
regiment were to have " a rest, not more than 
three hundred men having come out the day be- 
fore for battalion drill;" but in the afternoon, how- 
ever, an order came from brigade head-quarters 
for the regiment to have skirmish drill, Capt. 
Rundlet, being in command at the time, deployed 
the left wing as skirmishers, drilling them espe- 
cially in the movement of " lying down ; " the right 
wing, in the meantime, remaining in reserve. This 
order did not increase the popularity of the brigade 
conmiander. On the last day of the month, the 



44 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

regiment was again mustered for pay. On that 
day, also, a number of boxes reached camp, which 
had been sent to the regiment when at Portress 
Monroe. They had been intended for Thanksgiv- 
ing, but did not reach their destination until the 
fleet had sailed ; and three months' confinement 
had reduced the turkeys and chickens to skele- 
tons, and the puddings and pies had not increased 
in flavor. 

During the month, the regiment lost several val- 
uable members from disease. On the 3d, Orderly 
Sergt. Samuel J. Gore, of Co. E, died of typhoid 
fever, and was buried under arms; and on the 
4th, Sergt. Charles A. Howard, of Co. A, died of 
the same disease. Sergt. Howard received a com- 
mission as lieutenant in another regiment a day or 
two before he died. On the 3d of March, the Ser- 
geant-major, Walter W. Nourse, added another to 
the list from this fatal disease. Sergt. Nourse 
came out as 1st Sergt. of Co. P, and was the pet 
of that company, as well as a favorite with the 
whole regiment. Resolutions expressive of their 
sympathy were forwarded by Co. P to his bereaved 
friends ; and they also testified their respect for 
their comrade, by having his body embalmed, and 
sent home, where imposing funeral obsequies took 



ALABSI IN CAMP. 45 

place upon its arrival, and touching tributes to his 
memory were published in the newspapers. 

During the first week in March, a regimental 
well was dug ; and marching orders were at once 
expected, for, hitherto, these events had followed 
each other in close order ; and the rule was not 
now to be broken. On the 4th, the cooks had or- 
ders to cook rations. 'Ae next day, drill was dis- 
pensed with, and orders were issued to pack knap- 
sacks, and be ready to move at a moment's notice. 
Somewhat experienced in marching orders, the 
men made themselves quite easy over it, not 
expecting to get away for several days. Con- 
sequently, they were taken completely by surprise 
to hear the " assembly " just after dark, followed 
inmiediately by the " orderly's call" and the " offi- 
cers' call ; " and there was quite a hubbub in the 
camp. At first, there was supposed to be trouble 
in New Orleans ; and the men were elated at the 
prospect of having something to do. That morn- 
ing, one company had brought out but twenty- 
eight men for drill, — thirty-five reporting sick, 
and a number being detailed, — but, in a few min- 
utes after the assembly was heard, sixty men were 
in line, equipped for active service ; and the same 
spirit was shown in all the other companies. It 



46 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

was soon learned that the duty to be performed 
was near home, and was not relished so well. 
There had been some trouble in the One Hundred 
and Seventy Fifth New York ; the men refusing to 
go on the campaign imtil they were paid, they not 
havhig received any money since their enlistment. 
Their camp was surrounded by the other regi- 
ments or the brigade wfth loaded muskets and 
fixed bayonets; but, after a short address from 
the brigade commander, the men of the One Hun- 
dred and Seventy Fifth returned to duty, and the 
Thirty Eighth and the other regiments were re- 
leased from their unpleasant task. 

The next mornmg opened with a drizzling rain. 
At noon, orders were given to strike the tents on 
one side of the company streets, and put the knap- 
sacks in those of the other side ; and this was 
barely done, when the rain began to pour in tor- 
rents, and continued to do so for the remainder 
of the day. Three days' rations were put in the 
haversacks, and all the regimental baggage packed. 
The One Hundred and Seventy Fifth had started 
in the morning ; and the Fifty Third broke camp 
in the midst of the rain, and marched to the 
levee ; but the Thirty Eighth lingered imtil even- 
ing, when orders came to strike all the remain- 




DEPARTURE FROM THE STATE. 47 

ing tents, and take the baggage to the cars, which 
passed near the camp. The mud grew deeper 
and deeper, as the men wallowed through it; and, 
as the night was very dark, it was a diflSicult task 
to keep in the track. A large detail had been sent 
to store the baggage on board of the transports, 
and there were so many on the sick-list that it 
took the remainder nearly all night to load the 
cars. The few hours before morning were spent 
around the camp-fires; and, at sunrise, the regi- 
ment marched to the levee, stacked arms on the 
sidewalk opposite, and proceeded to put the re- 
mainder of the baggage, quartermaster's stores, 
&c., on board of the St. Mary's. It was a very 
carnival of mud ; and soon every one was coated 
with it. About noon, the regiment embarked ; 
and tired, sleepy, muddy, and packed like sar- 
dines, the men coiled themselves up in all shapes, 
and slept soundly in the hot sun. The boat ar- 
rived at Baton Rouge the next morning, and found 
the river full of gun-boats, mortar-boats, and trans- 
ports ; and signs that the campaign was about to 
open were everywhere apparent. Landing on the 
levee, the Thirty Eighth marched through the 
streets of the old capital of Louisiana to the 
Theatre Building, where they were quartered. 



48 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Although the climate and the unwholesome water 
had begun to do its work, the regiment was still 
comparatively strong, some companies taking near 
seventy men into the field ; and the long rows of 
stacked muskets on the floor of the Theatre had a 
martial look, and spoke of work in the future. 



CHAPTEE IV. 




Baton Rouge — Review by General Banks — March on Port Hudson — Passage 
of the Batteries by Hartford and Albatross — Burning of the Mississippi — 
Return to Baton Rouge — Woodchopping — Embark for Algiers — Easter 
Incident — Take Cars for Brashear — Berwick City. 

|ATON ROUGE was alive with troops, be- 
longing to every branch of the service. 
Staff-officers and orderlies were galloping 
through the town ; quartermasters and 
commissaries were full of business ; and 
flags were waving continually from the 
signal-towers. A few citizens were to be seen in 
the streets, grim and sullen ; but they were almost 
lost amid the blue-coats. The Thirty Eighth had 
orders to pack their dress-coats, and all other 
articles except blankets, overcoats, and a change 
of clothing. Old soldiers may smile at this idea 
of " light-marching order ; " but the men had not 
yet learned how little baggage was necessary for 
comfort and health. 

Wednesday, March 11, the iron-clad Essex, so 
famous in the annals of Mississippi warfare, ar- 
rived at Baton Rouge, and was inspected with 
6 U9) 



60 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

much interest by the troops. This boat was the 
wonder and delight of the contraband population ; 
and amusing stories were told of the effect pro- 
duced upon both black and white Southerners, 
when she first made her appearance before the 
city. Another examination was made in the 
division now, and the sick men, and those 
imable to endure the fatigue of field service, 
were sent to the hospital, and the command 
stripped to its marching and fighting material. 

Shelter-tents were issued on the 11th ; and 
during the first march, everybody carried tent- 
pins, with which to pitch them ; and this in 
a densely wooded country. The Thirty Eighth 
were proficient in the manual of arms, and could 
go through battalion movements creditably ; but 
they were not yet soldiers. On the 12th, the 
division was reviewed by Gens. Banks and Emory, 
accompanied by a large and brilliant staff. Admiral 
Parragut being present, and the centre of attrac- 
tion. Although the knapsacks had been reduced 
somewhat, the addition of the shelter-tents, and 
twenty extra rounds of cartridges, made the load 
fall heavy enough to be on the back from eight in 
the morning till one in the afternoon, when the 
review closed. The force on the field consisted of 



COMPLIMENTARY ORDER. 51 

thirteen regiments of infantry, three batteries, and 
several companies of cavalry ; and the review took 
place on the old battle-field of Baton Rouge, near the 
spot where Gen. Williams was killed, the marks of 
the bullets then fired being still visible on the trees 
and fence-posts. 

While at Baton Rouge, an order was issued by 
Gten. Banks, very complimentary to the Thirty 
Eighth. After a severe rebuke of the manner in 
which the officers of certain regiments had per- 
formed their duties, as shown by the reports of the 
Inspector General, the order went on to say : 
" The Commanding General cannot forbear point- 
ing to the marked contrast indicated in the same 
reports concerning the condition of the Thirty 
Eighth Massachusetts and the One Hundred and 
Sixteenth New York Volunteers, enlisted at about 
the same time ; but carried, by the zeal and laud- 
able ambition of their officers, beyond the reach 
of this pernicious influence." 

Although very flattering to officers and men, it 
was afterward thought that this order did not con- 
tribute much to the comfort of the regiment when 
under the control of brigade officers whose own 
commands were thus unfavorably contrasted with 
it. At six o'clock, on the evening of the 13th, 



52 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

orders came to fall in ; and the line was formed in 
front of the Theatre. Being on the left, the Thirty- 
Eighth remained in line while the division moved 
by; and cheers were exchanged, as the various 
regiments which had been connected with the 
Thirty Eighth passed, the One Hundred and Six- 
teenth being loudly greeted. When the time came 
for the regiment to move, Gen. Dudley, whose 
quarters were opposite, addressed it in a few words, 
concluding with, " Men of the Thirty Eighth^ 
keep cool, obey orders, and fire low." 

After leaving the city, and passing through the 
camps of Dudley's Brigade, wliich formed the 
reserve, and which was not to move until the next 
day, the road led through dense woods, where the 
vines and creeping-plants wove the forest into an 
almost impenetrable barrier, which shut out every 
ray of light. The column made slow progress, 
and the innumerable halts were as tiresome as the 
marching ; but about midnight, the bugles sounded 
a halt, and the army went into camp for the night 
in a corn-field. When the rear of the column 
reached the camp, the field was ablaze with camp- 
fires, and the fumes of the coffee were rising in the 
air. Up to this time, the company cook had done 
all the cooking, but each man had now to prepare 



REDUCING KNAPSACKS. 63 

his own rations, or go without. Upon going into 
camp, the troops were informed that the plantation 
belonged to a " Union man," and that they were 
only to take the " top rails " for fires. This order 
became a standing one in the Nineteenth Corps, 
and, during the campaign, they made it a point to 
take only the top rails, as they found them. The 
men were too weary to pitch the new shelter-tents ; 
and rolling their blankets round them, all except 
the camp and picket guard were soon asleep. 
The reveilld was beaten at two o'clock, and an 
early breakfast cooked. By this time, the " top- 
rails " were more accessible than on going into 
camp. 

At daylight, the march was resumed. The day 
proved to be a hot one ; and the roadside was soon 
strown with blankets, overcoats, knapsacks, and 
other articles thrown away by the regiments in 
advance. It was apparent that the army was rap- 
idly coming down to light-marching order. Con- 
trabands hung on the fiank and rear, picking up 
the cast-oflF garments. Some of the men, not yet 
having made up their minds to part with their 
overcoats, cut off the sleeves and skirts to lighten 
their loads. After marching about eleven miles, 
the column halted and went into camp in a cane- 



64 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

field, and stacked arms, a picket being thrown out. 
The sun came down hot, and the shelter-tents were 
found to be convenient. Toward night, the sound 
of heavy guns was heard in the vicinity of Port 
Hudson, and the cannonading continued through 
the night, while the shells from the gun-boats could 
be plainly seen bursting over the fort. The 
reveilld was beaten at four o'clock. The firing at 
Port Hudson had ceased; but a large mass of 
flame, which had been supposed to be some portion 
of the enemy's works, set on fiire by the guns from 
the fleet, began to move slowly down the river, 
accompanied, at intervals, by explosions. All eyes 
were fixed on the mysterious light, and many 
gloomy forebodings indulged in. Had Farragut 
been defeated, and the fleet been destroyed by 
some infernal machine ? Or was this one of the 
marine abortions of the enemy, committing sui- 
cide? Suddenly, at daylight, the mass of fire 
seemed to leap high in the air, followed by a dense 
column of smoke. The spectators waited in 
breathless suspense, for a few seconds, for the 
explosion. Soon it came ; and then every sleeper 
started to his feet. Orders were issued to put out 
all fires, and for every one to be equipped, and 
ready for action at a moment's notice. It was the 



"LIVING ON THE COUNTRY." t55 

general opinion that there would be a brush with 
the enemy, if not a pitched battle ; and the men 
were quiet, but determined. But the morning 
wore away without an alarm ; and, at ten o'clock, 
the line was formed, and the column headed for 
Baton Rouge, in which direction the wagon-train 
had already moved. The troops were in ill-humor, 
the whole movement seeming incomprehensible to 
them. Soon an aid from the commander-in-chief 
rode up to Col. Gooding with an order, request- 
ing him to announce to the third brigade that the 
" Hartford " and the " Albatross " had passed the 
batteries of Port Hudson, and that " the object of 
the expedition had been accomplished." Gradu- 
ally, the men recovered their accustomed spirits ; 
and when Gen. Banks rode by the column he was 
heartily cheered. On the march back, the car- 
casses in the fields showed that the reserve brigade 
had been " living on the country." The pontoon 
bridge was reached before night, but was not 
crossed, the brigade marching into the woods near 
the road, where they stacked arms and pitched 
tents. Soon after dark, it began to rain heavily, 
and the camping-ground became a swamp, while 
the water came through the new shelters, leaving 
few dry soldiers in camp that night. The next 



56 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

day, at noon, another expedition was undertaken. 
The roads were in a bad condition, and, in many 
places, it was necessary to go in single file, to 
escape being mired. After a four-mile march, a 
halt was made in a clearing, where the command 
remained during the night, ready to spring to arms 
at a moment's notice, and, the next day, marched 
back to the bayou. 

Friday, the line was again formed, and the bri- 
gade marched into Baton Rouge, and through the 
city to a magnolia grove, a mile beyond. The 
place was alive with mosquitoes, wood-ticks, and 
similar insects, and the nimble lizards glided about, 
making themselves familiar ; but the men were too 
weary to study natural history, and were soon 
sleeping soundly, in spite of such annoyances. 
The next day was devoted to bathing, washing 
clothes, and resting. On Sunday morning (22d), 
the regiment started again ; and, after marching 
through all the swamps, cane-fields, and hedges, 
bounding that part of the town, halted in one of 
the most forbidding looking spots in Baton Rouge, 
about a mile from the river, near the " Perkins 
Road." A camp was laid out, company streets 
staked off, and fatigue parties detailed to clear 
away the rubbish, dig up the stumps, and fill the 



ARRIVAL AT ALGIERS. 57 

bog-holes. The tents were pitched just in time to • 
afford partial shelter from a rain-storm. The men 
at this time had the impression that Sunday was 
the day especially selected in the Nineteenth Army 
Corps, on which to begin new movements, or do 
extra fatigue duty. In a day or two, the regi- 
mental and company baggage that had been 
packed was returned, and the A tents again 
pitched. 

Saturday, March 29th, the regiment took its turn 
at chopping down the forests in the vicinity of 
Baton Rouge, so that the guns from the fort might 
have a free range, in case of an attack from the 
enemy. Some could use the axe professionally; 
and all tried their hands on the lofty oaks, beeches, 
and magnolias, whose fall resounded through the 
forest, until the sound of the recall, at four o'clock, 
when the regiment returned to camp, tired, but in 
great good-humor. Drill was resumed, and the 
old routine of camp duties began ; but this did not 
last long, however ; for the first day of April found 
the regiment on board of a transport, again steam- 
ing down the Mississippi. Landing at Algiers 
(opposite the city of New Orleans), a new camp 
was laid out, the tents again pitched, and drilling 
went on as usual. Regiments continued to arrive 



58 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

' every day ; and soon the plains of Algiers were 
white with the tents of Emory's division. 

Here, for the first time since its organization, 
the regimental camp -guard was dispensed with, 
and the men allowed a little liberty to look 
around, and see the country they were fighting 
for. That they did not abuse the confidence thus 
reposed in them by their officers, may be inferred 
from the fact, that no regimental guard was placed 
around the Thirty Eighth after that time ; and 
when other regiments were confined to strict camp- 
limits, Lieut. -Col. Richardson allowed his com- 
mand, when off duty, to roam anywhere within 
sound of the bugle, and, when stationed near a 
town or city, freely gave leave of absence when it 
did not conflict with orders from higher authori- 
ties. 

At 'this time, the Forty Seventh Massachusetts 
was doing garrison duty in New Orleans, and, 
having many acquaintances in the Thirty Eighth, 
visited them often. The contrast between the 
nicely -fitting, home-made uniforms of the Forty 
Seventh boys, and the shoddy affairs furnished by 
the contractors to the Thirty Eighth, was a source 
of much amusement to the members of the latter 
regiment. In the field, clothing was a matter of 



EAST£R INCIDENT. 59 

little importance ; but when a haversack strap or 
a knapsack buckle broke at the beginning of a 
long march, or the sole came off a shoe at a slight 
stumble, which very often happened, the comments 
on the patriotism of those who provided for the 
wants of the army were more expressive than ele- 
gant. 

Although New Orleans and Algiers had been in 
the Union hands for over a year, the feeling was 
still bitter toward the North. The following inci- 
dent will illustrate this feeling. The day before 
Easter, the writer of this sketch had a few hours 
of leisure, and was strolling through the streets 
looking at the objects of interest, when, passing 
a small church, the sound of Easter hymns floated 
out on the air. Not having been inside of a 
church for many months, the sweet music brought 
memories of home to the mind; and, stepping 
noiselessly inside, he stood near the door, listen- 
ing respectfully. The choir was engaged in a re- 
hearsal, under the direction of a gentleman whose 
white cravat and clerical air bespoke the minister. 
Suddenly, the singers caught sight of the blue 
uniform, and the music instantly ceased. Upon 
following the direction of their glances, the clergy- 
man cast what he evidently intended to be a with- 



60 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

ering look on the unwelcome spectator. A silence 
of a few moments ensued, when the soldier asked 
if he was intruding. " Yes," was the reply, in a 
very curt tone. Apologizing for the unintentional 
intrusion, the visitor retreated, followed to the door 
by the chivalrous clergyman, who probably took 
precautions to prevent his choir from being shocked 
by the presence of any more blue uniforms, while 
singing the anthems of " Peace on earth, and good 
will to men." 

Labor being scarce in Algiers, several regiments 
were called upon to furnish fatigue parties to as- 
sist in raising a gun-boat on the ways in the dry- 
dock ; and, on the 8th of April, the Thirty Eighth 
took their turn, and completed the task. 

The regimental baggage was again packed away ; 
and all personal property, with the exception of a 
rubber blanket, overcoat, and change of clothing 
to each man, was packed in the knapsacks, and 
nailed up in large boxes ; and at two o'clock, on 
the morning of the 9th, the reveille woke the 
sleeping camp, the tents were struck, and, by 
seven o'clock, the regiment was on board of the 
cars, bound for the interior of Louisiana. For 
eighty miles, the road ran through a low, swampy 
country. The ditches beside the embankment on 



BERWICK CITY. 61 

which the track was laid were full of alligators, 
who swam lazily through the green, stagnant 
waters, or basked in the sun on the banks ; nearly 
every floating log or stick was tenanted by a re- 
pulsive water-moccasin ; and frogs of huge propor- 
tions plumped into the water as the train went by. 
These specimens of the animate life of Louisiana 
were regarded with much interest by the regi- 
ment, as they were to be intimate neighbors, pos- 
sibly, in the future. 

The line of road was guarded by New York 
and Connecticut regiments; and their post did 
not appear to be an enviable one. A little after 
noon, the train arrived at Brashear City. The 
place was full of troops ; and others were contin- 
ually arriving in the cars or on foot, and cross- 
ing the bay to Berwick City. The Thirty Eighth 
formed in line, the sick-call was blown, and an- 
other examination held ; and all those who were 
considered unable to keep up with the column 
were kept behind, to do light guard-duty. Some 
who had been foremost in every duty were left 
here, much to their regret. After waiting for an 
hour or two, the regiment embarked on the gun- 
boat " CUnton," and was transported across Ber- 
wick Bay to Berwick City, accompanied by Gen. 



r>a THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Banks and staff, and the shelter-tents pitched in a 
lovol field, where the clover was ankle-deep. A 
largo force was collected here, the troops of 
Emory's division being joined to the veterans 
of Weitzel, who had already achieved victory in 
this vicinity. 




CHAPTEE V. 

On the March agahi— Co. F Detached to guard Bridge — Centreville — Battle 
of Bisland — Pursuit of the enemy — Franklin — District of the T^che — 
Neutral Flags — A Day's Best — Fording a Bayou — Opelouaaa. 

N the 11th of April, the division broke 
camp, and moved out on the main road 
toward Centreville ; the gun-boats shelling 
the woods from the bayou, and the cavalry 
scouting in advance. Co. F was detached, 
and ordered to remain behind to guard a 
bridge on the line of the railroad, to prevent raids 
on the rear, while the army moved on. 

The rebels were reported to be in large force 
near Pattersonville, under the command of Gren. 
Dick Taylor, determined to stop the advance of the 
Union troops through this portion of the Confeder- 
acy ; and they were reported to have erected strong 
fortifications at Camp Bisland. 

After a dusty march over the turnpike, feeling 
its way along, the army went into camp beyond 
Pattersonville ; and soon the camp-fires were blaz- 
ing for miles around, lighting up the country, and 

r63) 



64 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

giving the enemy warning of the approach of the 
Union forces. 

Co. F remained in its position, crouching be- 
hind the brakes, and occasionally throwing sticks 
at the alligators in the ditches, and all the while 
keeping a sharp look-out for the rebel pickets 
ahead, until four o'clock, when it crossed the 
bridge, and struck out for the army. Just beyond 
the bridge, a letter was picked up, addressed to a 
woman in Texas, and bearing Confederate postage- 
stamps. It purported to have been written on 
picket that day, and gave a statement of the num- 
ber of Confederate troops in the vicinity, with some 
account of the movements of the Union forces. It 
was well written, but had probably been dropped on 
purpose, with tlie intention of misleading. Night 
found the company marching through the woods, 
the rebel picket-posts by the road-side giving evi- 
dence of having been occupied quite recently. No 
one in the company was acquainted with the road ; 
and the chances were even of bringing up in either 
camp ; but the orders were peremptory to join the 
regiment in the evening. After a march of sev- 
eral hours, sometimes by the flank, sometimes in 
single file, through ditches, hedges, and swamps, 
the camp-fires of an army appeared in sight. 



AETILLEEY ENGAGEMENT. 65 

Doubtful whether it were friend or foe, Captain 
Rundlet sent out reconnoiterers, who soon as- 
certained that all was right, and the company 
marched into the camp of the Second Rhode 
Island Cavalry. The regiment was a mile further 
on, encamped in a cane-field, beyond Patterson- 
ville. 

The owner of the plantation had fled ; but many 
of the negroes still remained, and were soon at 
work making corn-cakes for the soldiers, out of 
massa's meal. 

About noon, the army advanced in line of battle. 
The march was through a cane-field, the canes still 
standing ; and, as they grew thick and strong, it 
became diflScult to keep a proper line. The bat- 
teries were moving up to the front, shelling the 
woods as they advanced ; and a rifle-shot would be 
occasionally heard. After marching in this manner 
for two miles, the regiment halted for several 
hours, the cannonading still continuing. Between 
three and four o'clock, it was announced that the 
fighting was over for the day, and the march was 
resumed; but it was suddenly stopped by the 
breaking out afresh of the artillery fire. Lay- 
ing on the ground, in cover of the standing cane, 
the regiment witnessed a sharp artillery engage- 

6* 



66 THE STORY OP THB THIRTY EIGHTH. 

meiit. A large sugar-mill had been set on fire, 
and the flames soon spread to the surrounding 
cabins. The bursting of the shells, the volumes of 
flame and smoke issuing from the mill, the sharp 
crack of the rifle, the galloping of aids over the 
field with orders, and the bayonets glistening over 
the tops of the canes, as the brigades manoeuvred 
over the field, was a new experience to the Thirty 
Eighth. The firing lasted ^bout an hour, gradually 
ceasing as the batteries fell back ; the position of 
the enemy having been ascertained, and the object 
of the reconnoissance accomplished. Fires were not 
allowed, and the men went without their coffee for 
the first time. Equipments were kept on, and the 
regiment bivouacked in rear of the stacks. In the 
evening, a call was made for sharpshooters, to pick 
off the gunners of the Diana, in case she should 
come down the bayou ; and the number required 
reported at once. There was no alarm during the 
night ; and, in the morning, the army again moved 
forward. A bridge had been thrown across the 
bayou ; and the third brigade crossed over, a rebel 
shell occasionally dropping into the water, near the 
bridge, sending up the spray, and facilitating the 
passage of the troops, who wished to do their fight- 
ing on firmer footing than the swaying bridge 



BATJLE OF BISLAND. 67 

afforded. The artillery were at work on both sides, 
and it was evident that the long-expected battle 
was about to take place. While the brigade was 
getting into line, after having crossed the stream, 
Gens. Banks and Emory passed, and were enthusi- 
astically greeted. Marching up the road, the 
brigade filed into a cane-field, in front of a portion 
of the rebel works. The Thirty First Massa- 
chusetts were in advance, the Thirty Eighth 
following, with the Fifty Third Massachusetts in 
the rear ; and the One Hundred and Fifty Sixth 
New York were sent toward the woods on the 
right. The cane-field was intersected with broad, 
deep ditches, now entirely dry, and their sides 
lined with blackberry bushes. The Thirty First 
deployed, and moved forward in a skirmish-line 
part way across the field, until within gunshot 
of the enemy, when they halted in one of the 
ditches, and began to fire, the rebels occasionally 
returning the shots, from behind the breastworks. 
The Thirty First retained their position during the 
forenoon, losing two or three men, who were car- 
ried to the rear past the Thirty Eighth, which 
remained in reserve, picking blackberries, watching 
the fight, and getting their ears accustomed to the 
shrieking of the shells, and the discharges of 



C8 THE STORY OP THE THII^TY EIGHTH. 

nmsketry. The one Hundred and Fifty Sixth, in 
the meantime, were gradually working their way 
into the woods on the right flank. The heavy 
firing on the left of the bayou told that the other 
brigades were also at work. 

While Gen. Emory's division and Weitzel's bri- 
gade were confronting the enemy, and engaging 
their attention, Gen. Grover's division, which had 
crossed the country through the La Pourche dis- 
trict, was endeavoring to come in their rear, and 
thus, by enclosing them between the two portions 
of the army, cut off all retreat, and compel the 
surrender of the entire force. Having this pro- 
gramme in view, it had not been the policy of Gen. 
Banks to bring on a decisive engagement until 
Grover was ready to " close up the bag." 

At noon, the anmiunition of the Thirty First 
being exhausted, it was relieved by the Thirty 
Eighth. This position was occupied but a short 
time, when the order was given to advance. Keep- 
ing the exact distance they had been taught in 
the drill, in a well-dressed skirmish-line, the men 
moved steadily toward the breastworks. The right 
companies soon began to receive shots from the 
Woods ; but were instructed not to fire in that di- 
rection, as the One Hundred and Fifty Sixth held 



BATTLE OF BISLAND. 69 

the position. Obeying orders, they reserved their 
fire until the rebel gunners were plainly visible 
working the batteries. A piece of cane had been 
left standing near the line of earthworks ; and, just 
before the advance reached its cover, the rebels 
opened a rapid fire of artillery and musketry. The 
skirmishers were ordered to lie down, while liie 
shells and bullets screamed and whistled over their 
heads. But they were not long inactive. Taking 
advantage of stumps, ditches, furrows, and canes, 
they poured a rapid fire into the enemy's works. 
The gunners were picked off ; and the traditional 
" officer on the white horse " was made an es- 
pecial target. While the right was more exposed 
to the enemy's rifles, the centre and left sufiFered 
from their artillery, the colors being a prominent 
mark. Color-corporal Trow, of Co. D, was in- 
stantly killed by a solid shot ; and Cos. A and 
Q sufiFered particularly from shells. By one of 
these explosions, Capt. Gault, of the former com- 
pany, had his leg badly shattered, and died in a 
few hours ; and a number of men were wounded. 
The battle lasted all day on both sides of the 
bayou. As evening drew near, the ammunition of 
the Thirty Eighth gave out. Many men had fired 
all their cartridges, and were trying to borrow 



70 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

I 

from their more economical comrades. The 
wounded had been taken to the rear, and attended 
to in the field hospital. And now the Fifty 
Third came forward, and relieved the Thirty 
Eighth, who fell slowly back under fire, till they 
reached the place selected as quarters for the 
night, — a deep, dry ditch, near the centre of the 
field. Of course, no fires were allowed, and sup- 
per was made of hard-tack and water. 

Partly filling the ditch with dry canes, and 
wrapping their blankets around them, with the 
guns of the First Maine Battery beating the tattoo 
a few yards in their rear, the men laid down, 
their rifles by their side, and their equipments on, 
ready to fall in line at the first call. * Contrary to 
expectation, there was no alarm during the night. 
In the morning, a portion of the field was searched 
for missing men. Thomas W. Hevey,.of Co. I, 
was brought in, dead, the stem of his pipe firmly 
fixed in his teeth. He was smoking when struck 
by the fatal bullet, and fell on his face. During 
the engagement, six had been killed and thirty 
wounded, a complete list of whom will be found 
in another portion of the work. 

Firbs were now allowed to be built, and coffee 
made, after which the regiment moved forward in 



RETREAT OF THE ENEMY. 71 

line. The Fifty Third had remained all night in 
the front, and its flags were seen near the works, 
the regiment advancing in line of battle. The 
Thirty First was also moving on. All was quiet 
behind the earthworks ; and soon the report came 
that the enemy had evacuated their position during 
the night, and were in full retreat, three miles 
ahead. At this time. Gen. Grover was supposed 
by the men to have cut oflF all retreat, and the army 
was in excellent spirits at the anticipated bagging 
of the whole force ; but it was soon learned that 
a hole had been left, and the slippery foe had 
wriggled out of it. Crossing the cane-field, the 
Thirty Eighth entered the rebel works. The killed 
and wounded men had been removed; but the 
dead horses scattered about gave evidence of the 
accuracy of the aim of the brigade in this its 
maiden fight. The camp-fires were still smoulder- 
ing inside of the works ; and the remains of the 
hasty breakfast of roasted ears of corn gave proof 
that the rebels had not been long gone. Skirmish- 
ing a short distance through the woods beyond the 
fortifications, and finding no enemy, the line was 
again formed, and the brigade moved by the flank 
along the road, until further progress was stopped 
by a bayou, the bridge over which had been par- 



72 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

tially burned, and was still smoking. Here an 
abandoned caisson was fished out of the stream, 
the first trophy of the victory. The pioneers soon 
repaired the bridge, and the column passed over, 
and halted a few hours, while the artillery and the 
. wagon-train .were brought across. 

It was a long, weary march that Gen. Dick 
Taylor led the Army of the Gulf through this 
country of bayous and plantations. Had there 
been a respectable cavalry force in the department, 
but few of those who fought behind the fortifica- 
tions of Bisland would have reached Alexandria ; 
but the delay caused in repairing bridges pre- 
vented the Union army from coming up with its 
foes, and the majority of them escaped, although 
completely demoralized, and deprived of the power 
of acting on the ofiensive for several months. 

An amusing incident occurred just after the 
march was resumed. A man, apparently dressed 
in gray imiform, was seen running across a corn- 
field, toward the woods. Although many hun- 
dred yards ofi", a number of rifles were instantly 
levelled at him, and the minnies went whistling 
on their errand. He hesitated for a moment, 
and then started on again, when another discharge 
took place, and the dust was seen to fly near the 



THE PURSUIT. 73 

mark. Making frantic signals, he faced about, 
and came toward the road. A nearer inspection 
proved him to be a harmless contraband, in the 
usual plantation suit. The fighting of the day 
before had given the boys a liking for the soimd 
of their Enfields ; and probably every gun in the 
regiment would have been discharged if the fugi- 
tive had not halted. The poor fellow, no doubt, 
came to the conclusion that the " day of jubilo " 
had not yet come. 

The heat was intense during the day, and 
the men suflFered a good deal from the dust and 
from thirst, many falling out. But the command- 
ing general wished to give the enemy no time to 
throw up intrenchments. Barely halting long 
enough for a hasty lunch at noon, the column 
pushed on. A little while after dark, the brigade 
passed through the pretty town of Franklin, and 
went into camp in a cane-field. No one thought 
of pitching tents, or of cooking coffee. Eating a 
few hard-tack, and washing it down with bayou 
water, each man (except the unfortunate guard) 
selected as level a furrow as convenient, spread 
his rubber, and was soon enjoying a well-earned 
rest. Just as the men had settled themselves for 
the night, the commissary sergeant came around 

7 



74 THE STORY OF THE THIBTY EIGHTH. 

with the information that fresh meat was ready. 
It was left on the ground for the benefit of the 
plantation hands who swarmed in the rear of the 
army. 

Wednesday morning, April 18, the column 
moved at six o'clock, the Thirty Eighth on the 
right of the brigade, making the marching a little 
easier than on the day before. The country 
through which the army was now passing, known 
as the TSche district, was considered the richest 
part of Louisiana previous to the war. Unable to 
get their crops to market, the sugar and cotton- 
houses were filled to overflowing. Large herds of 
cattle fed in the pastures, and the woods were fall 
of hogs. Nearly all of the able-bodied young men 
were in the Confederate army ; and, at the ap- 
proach of the Union troops, the old planters 
fled to the woods in many instances, and hid 
until the column had passed by. No Northern 
soldiers had been seen in that country before; 
and the long lines of infantry, the numerous bat- 
teries, and the immense wagon-trains, were a 
source of never-ending wonder to the crowds of 
slaves, who flocked to the roadsides and climbed 
the fences to see Massa Linkum's boys. " Bress 
de Lord ! We'se been lookin' for ye dese twenty 



NEUTRAL FLAGS. 75 

years, and ye're come at last ! " exclaimed one 
well-developed old lady, who, clothed in a very 
short dress, very full pants, and a broad plantation 
hat, had moimted on a high rail-fence to get a good 
look at the Yankee soldiers. These poor people 
had little means with which to gratify their desires 
to serve those whom they looked upon as friends ; 
yet many of them baked their last mess of meal 
into corn-cake for the hungry soldiers. The few 
white men that were seen in this region had the 
appearance of having just thrown the musket 
aside, with the intention of resuming it again 
as soon as the army passed, and before the sun- 
marks should fade from their faces. 

On many of the houses, English and French 
flags were flying ; the inmates thinking their prop- 
erty might be more secure by claiming foreign pro- 
tection. During the entire march, private prop- 
erty was respected to a degree never before shown 
by an army in an enemy's country ; and guards 
were placed over many of the houses of prominent 
rebels. It is true that less regard was shown to 
the occupants of a poorer class of houses ; and the 
immense number of contrabands attached to the 
Army of the Gulf, in the capacity of officers' ser- 
vants, were not very scrupulous, and generally 



76 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

came into camp at night pretty well laden with 
poultry and vegetables ; but, as their labor had 
produced these articles, perhaps they were entitled 
to them. An indiscriminate liberty to forage would 
have been fatal to the efficiency of the army, and 
might have defeated the object of the campaign. 
Thus, while there was comparatively little foraging 
carried on, these foreign flags were no safeguard. 
If an unlucky chicken or pig had happened in 
the way, he would have been gobbled up, if he had 
borne the private mark of Victoria or Napoleon. 

Thursday night, the army went into camp before 
dark, beyond the village of Indian Bend. The 
country hitherto had been perfectly level, and, 
previous to the war, was mostly devoted to the 
culture of sugar ; but, in accordance with the ad- 
vice of the Confederate leaders, many of the plan- 
tations were now planted with corn. 

On Friday, the aspect of the country changed, 
and rolling prairies succeeded to the low plains. 
Herds of cattle roamed over these prairies ; the 
view of which caused some lively comments on 
the starving-out theory indulged in by some of 
the good people at home. Saturday, April 18, 
the entire force rested. It had been a full week 
since leaving Berwick City; and the troops had 



THE MARCH CONTINUED. 77 

been marching or fighting continuously, sleeping 
nearly every night with their equipments on. In 
addition to this, each regiment furnished its pro- 
portion of the picket ; and, after a march of from 
twenty to thirty miles, those detailed had to sling 
their bundles again, go oflF half a mile or a mile 
into the woods, and keep awake part of the night, 
peering into the darkness, and making their supper 
of hard-tack and water. It may, perhaps, be im- 
agined how welcome this day of rest was to both 
man and beast, under these circumstances. 

A fine head of cattle was confiscated here ; 
and a large portion of the day spent in feasting. 
In fact, there was no lack of fresh meat during 
the entire march through this country ; but, as it 
was brought into camp generally after the men 
had quartered for the night, little of it was cooked. 
And then this was the first year in the field, and 
that experience had not been acquired which makes 
the difference between raw recruits and veterans. 

Sunday morning, the 19th, the army was again 
in motion. The line was just forming, when the 
clouds opened, and the rain and hail came down 
in a manner peculiar to Louisiana. In a few min- 
utes, every one was wet to the skin ; and, in this 
state, a long day's march began. The cavalry and 

7* 



78 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

artillery cut up the roads, so that the infantry 
went into the soft mud to the ankles at every step. 
During the day, the army marched through the 
village of Lafayetteville, in which nearly every 
house had a white rag hung out as a token of 
peace. These people had heard such stories of the 
Union army, that they looked upon its approach 
with terror and apprehension; but the men who 
enlisted in '61 and '62 were no desperadoes, and 
did not make war on women and children. That 
night, the brigade encamped on a piece of grass- 
land, and found it much preferable to the usual 
cane-field furrows. Starting again in the morning 
(April 20), a wide, shallow stream was reached, 
which had to be forded. The horses went over 
first, making numerous holes in the soft bottom ; 
and it was an amusing sight to see the infantry 
feel their way cautiously along, half sliding, half 
walking, some unfortimate individual occasionally 
missing his footing, and plunging headlong into 
the muddy stream. 

About four o'clock, p. m., the bugles sounded a 
halt, and an aide rode down from the front with an 
order to the eflfect, that Opelousas, the Confederate 
capital of the State, had surrendered uncondition- 
ally. This important annoimcement was received 



A SOUTHERN CAPITAL. 79 

with cheers ; the ranks closed up ; the colors were 
unfurled ; the drums beat ; and, with a proud step, 
the column marched on. Passing a few scattering 
houses, the open country was again reached, when 
the inquiries became numerous as to the where- 
abouts of the capital. It was learned that the 
army had marched through one of the principal 
streets. This was not the first time they had been 
deceived by an imposing name bestowed upon a 
handM of buildings ; but it was hardly worth 
while to make a parade of surrendering this little 
clearing, if the travelling government of the State 
did make a transient stay there. 




CHAPTEB VI. 



Camp at Opelouras— Cotton versus Potatoes — Fourth Wlwimain Oaviliy— 
Term " boys " not to be used in Third Brigade ^Airtral of QtkanaikH Obv- 
alry at Baton Rouge — The March resumed — Alexandria. — Bad BiTW— 
Start for the Mississippi — Morganza. 



jJAYLOR'S force had by this time become 
completely demoralized and broken up, 
and a portion of it captured; there was 
no longer any fear of its assuming the 
offensive ; and the army remained in camp 
until the 5th of May, whfle plans were be- 
ing matured for the continuance of the campaign. 
Great inconvenience was experienced here from 
the scarcity of wood and water. Beginnijig with 
the nearest fences, the cooks and their assistants 
had gradually laid bare the fields beyond the 
picket-line. A muddy pond near the camp fur- 
nished a portion of the water, until the horses re- 
fused to drink it, when the men gave it up, and 
brought water from the wells, at a great distance. 
Wliile laying here, long trains of wagons daily 
passed in sight of the camp, laden with cotton ; 
and many of the volunteers, who had been accus- 

(80) 



REVIEW AT OPELOUSAS. 81 

tomojd to think for themselves, and still held thai 
privilege in reserve, were of the opinion, that if the 
teams had been employed, under regularly organ- 
ized fatigue parties, in bringing sweet potatoes and 
other vegetables into the camps, a more efficient 
force might have been taken to Port Hudson, and 
the country better served than in collecting cotton, 
even for its own benefit. 

During the halt at Opclousas, a series of com- 
plimentary orders were read to the troops on 
parade, from Gens. Banks, Emory, and the bri- 
.gade commander, Col. Gooding, congratulating 
them on their success, and expressing confidence 
in the successful prosecution of the campaign. 

On the 24th, the division was reviewed by 
Gens. Banks and Emory. The first brigade (Col. 
Ingraham's) had been broken up, and the regi- 
ments composing it stationed at the various im- 
portant posts between Brashear and Opclousas ; so 
that there were present only eleven regiments of 
infantry, two batteries, and some squadrons of cav- 
alry. The Fourth Wisconsin made its first ap- 
pearance at this review as cavalry. Mounted on 
horses and mules of every description, with most 
primitive and imique equipments, it excited con- 
siderable merriment, and gave little promise of the 



82 THE STORY OF THE THIRTT EIGHTH. 

great reputation it afterwards attained, — the pride 
of the Army of the Gulf, and the terror of the 
rebels of Louisiana. 

At tills time, an order was issued by the brigade 
commander, forbidding officers to address the men 
as "boys," saying that they were men in every 
sense of the word, and should be so styled at all 
times. The " boys " laughed at this new idea : 
the custom was too deep-seated in the service to be 
eradicated by a brigade order. The mails did not 
reach the regiment very often ; and there were all 
kinds of rumors in. regard to matters in the world 
outside. The announcement 'of the fall of Charles- 
ton was received with mingled cheers and expres- 
sions of doubt. 

Monday night, May 4, an order was read on 
parade, announcing the arrival at Baton Rouge 
of a cavalry force imder Col. Grierson, after a 
successful raid through the State of Mississippi. 
The news of this achievement was received with 
pleasure by the Army of the Gulf, as showing 
that the heavy drain on the fighting men of the 
South had begim to show itself by the defenceless 
state of that portion of the Confederacy away from 
the immediate vicinity of the chief rebel armies. 

There was but little drilling at Opelousas, the in- 



FROM OPELOlTSAS TO ALEXANDRIA. 83 

tense heat during the greater part of the time, 
making officers and men alike glad to seek the 
shade. Capt. Doten, of Co. G, resigned his com- 
mission at this time, and made a farewell address 
to the regiment before taking his leave. On the 
30th, the regiment was mustered for pay; and 
Tuesday morning, the 5tli of May, found it again 
on the march. Passing through the little town 
of Washington, about six miles from Opelousas, 
the route lay through a rich cotton and sugar sec- 
tion ; but the greater portion of the land was now 
planted with com, the rebels having learned that 
Cotton was no longer king. Marching for miles 
through these immense fields of corn, growing rapn 
idly under the Louisiana sun, the men of the 
Thirty Eighth were amused at the ponderous ar- 
ticles which occasionally reached them in some of 
the Northern journals, demonstrating how easy it 
would be to starve the South into submission. 

The roads began to be very dusty, and often- 
times the water was poor and scarce ; but the 
army kept on its way, day after day, the men 
dragging themselves into camp at night, with 
blistered feet, and too tired to cook the fresh 
meat regularly issued. For four days, this forced 
marching was continued, barely stopping long 



84 TH| STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

eiiough at noon to boil a dipper of coffee. On the 
8th of May, when a few miles from Alexandria, 
news came, that the gun-boats of Admiral Porter 
had reached that town, and that it was in posses- 
sion of the navy. After a long halt at noon, the 
regiments unrolled their flags, the bands uncov- 
ered their instruments, and the army marched 
into the town in good order, to music which had 
become strange to this portion of the Union, and 
which was heard by the residents with no emotions 
of pleasure. The faces of the citizens wore that 
same expression of mingled bitterness and curios- 
ity that had been noticed in Franklin, Opelousas, 
and Washington; and even the little children 
seemed to think it no pageant in which they 
should take delight. Marching through the town, 
the brigade went into camp on a level grass-plat, 
near the banks of the Red River. 

By order of Gen. Emory, drills were dispensed 
with at Alexandria, and " every opportunity given 
the men to recover from the fatigues of the recent 
march, and prepare for the active duties still be- 
fore them." The river was alive with bathers 
daily ; and its banks were lined with busy washer- 
men. Gun-boats and transports steamed up and 
down the river, giving a lively appearance to the 



BIVOUAC BY THE SUGAR-MILL. 85 

place ; but business, other than military and naval, 
was stagnant. 

On the 14th, marching orders were received. 
The reveille was beaten at two o'clock, a. m., the 
next morning (Friday) ; but the Thirty Eighth 
having the position of rear-guard, did not move un- 
til daylight. There had been heavy showers the 
day previous, turning the dust into mud, and the 
progress was slow. Still twenty miles were made, 
the army going into camp occupied by them on the 
upward march, on the banks of a bayou. 

The next morning, the third brigade had the 
centre of the column, and the marching was easier. 
The old road was followed as far as the village of 
Cheneyville, when the route changed, and the army 
turned again toward the Red River. That night, 
the regiment camped in a cane-field near a large 
sugar-mill, stored with more than one year's crop. 
The troops were liberally supplied with sugar by 
order of the division commander, the neighboring 
fields supplied adventurous foragers with new po- 
tatoes, and the plantation ditches were full of 
ripe blackberries ; so that, with the fresh meat 
issued by the quartermaster, the regiment fared 
unusually well, and long remembered the bivouac 
by the old mill. 



86 THE STORT OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

A short march was made the next day, the army 
going into camp at nine o'clock, near Sinmisport, 
on the Atchafalaya River. There, to the great joy 
of every one, a large mail, both of letters and pa- 
pers, was received ; and the regiment once more 
learned how the world outside was moving. Tues- 
day morning. May 19, the troops were ferried across 
the Atchafalaya, and encamped on the other side, 
with the expectation of remaining several days; 
but Thursday morning saw the inevitable " order- 
ly " ride into camp, and the column was again in 
motion. 

For the past month, the weather had been rap- 
idly growing warmer, the roads more dusty, and 
the swamp and bayou water on the line of march 
more unpalatable; and the regiment parted with 
regret from' the clear Atchafalaya, with its green, 
shady banks, and its beautiful scenery. 

A portion of the country in this vicinity having 
been flooded by breaks in the levee, the progress 
was slow ; the artillery and wagons being obliged 
to go on top of the embankment raised to keep 
back the waters of the Old River, — a fornaer bed 
of the Mississippi. The regiment went into camp 
about dark, in a woods, beyond a small town, and. 
starting again at daylight, during the forenoon 



THfi MISSISSIPPI AGAIN. 87 

reached the Mississippi, at Morganza Bend. De 
Soto and his Spaniards greeted the mighty river 
with no more enthusiasm on its discovery than did 
the dusty and thirsty Army of the Gulf when it 
once more came in view. Its muddy waters were 
eagerly sipped, and the canteens filled for future 
use. 




CHAPTEE yil. 

Cross the Mississippi — Bayou Sara — Storm — St. Francisville — Approach Port 
Hudson — Skirmish on the 25th of May — Negro Soldiers — Battle of May 
27 —Death of Lieut.-Col. Rodman — The KaTines. 

yT Morganza, the army found transports 
awaiting to take it across the river. 
A sail of fourteen miles brought the 
steamers to Bayou Sara, where the troops 
were disembarked, and rations issued. 
This village had seen fit to harbor the 
guerillas, who, from their ambush, had fired alike 
on vessels of war and peaceful river-boats ; and it 
bore the fiarks of the prompt punislmient in- 
flicted by the gun-boats. Solitary chimneys arose 
from heaps of rubbish which marked the spots 
where once houses and places of business had 
rested secure under the old flag; and a general 
air of lifelessness and decay pervaded the place. 

The regiment had scarcely begun the ascent of 
the steep bluff" overlookhig the village, when one 
of the sudden storms peculiar to the Valley of the 
Mississippi, broke over them; and in a few min- 

_..-r.- (88) 



PORT HUDSON SURROUNDED. 89 

utes they were not ouly wet through, but the deep 
red soil was so saturated, that marching became 
almost impossible. Passing through the village 
of St. Francisville, the brigade encamped at night 
near a cotton-press, and built huge fires, around 
which the men grouped till partially dry ; the 
picket detail, however, going to their posts wet 
and supperless, but without complaint. 

The next morning, upon the arrival of Mack's 
Black Horse Battery (Eighteenth New York), the 
column moved toward Port Hudson. The road 
was bordered on each side by a high hedge, which 
shut out all air, and made the heat very oppres- 
sive ; and it was gratifying, upon emerging into the 
open country, to find a broad, shallow stream, with 
a clean, pebbly bottom directly in the line of march. 
It was easily forded by the infantry, but the artil- 
lery and wagons caused some delay. While wait- 
ing for the batteries to cross the stream, a body of 
cavalry rode by, which proved to be the famed com- 
mand of Col. Grierson, whose great raid through 
Mississippi was the forerunner of the exploits of 
Sheridan, Stoneman, and Kilpatrick. Gen. Banks 
and staff also rode by ; and the cheering news was 
announced that a connection had been made with 
the division of Gen. Augur, wliich had marched up 



i/0 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

fipom Baton Rouge, and that Port Hudson was 
completely surrounded, and its fall a matter of 
time only. 

Sunday, May 24, the regiment enjoyed a rest, 
merely changing camp once. On the 25th, the 
Thirty Eighth leaving the brigade, marched to 
Sandy Creek, on the extreme right of the line ; and 
several of the companies deployed as skirmishers 
near the creek, the enemy firing across the stream 
from the opposite side. In this skirmish, two men 
were killed, and two wounded. 

In the afternoon, two native Louisiana regiments 
arrived at the creek ; and the Thirty Eighth had an 
opportunity to witness the behavior of the first col- 
ored troops under fire in this war. A gi*eat deal 
of romance has been spoken and printed about this 
affair ; but, without wishing to detract in the least 
from the really valuable services rendered by the 
colored troops during the siege, especially in the en- 
gineer's department, it may be doubted if the ex- 
aggerated accounts of their bravery were of any 
real benefit to the " colored boys in blue." 

It had been the fashion for so long a time to de- 
cry the courage of the colored man, and deny him 
all the attributes of manhood, that, when he proved 
himself something more than a beast of burden, 



MULE-PANIC. 91 

public opinion went to the opposite extreme ; and 
men who had been for years boasting of the supe- 
riority of the Northern over the Southern races, 
and quoting all history to prove it, now asserted 
that this new freedman was the equal, if not the 
superior, of the Northern volunteer. It was even 
reported that Gen. Banks had said that the colored 
soldiers went where the white ones dared not go ; 
and although this was an improbable story, it in- 
jured the general's popularity, and increased 
the prejudice already existing against the colored 
troops in the Thirteenth and Nineteenth Corps. 

The regiment remained near Sandy Creek dur- 
ing the next day, supporting the battery, while 
the colored regiments were at work building a 
bridge. On the night of the 26th, there were 
two alarms, caused by the stampeding of mules ; 
and the Thirty Eighth received a volley from one 
of the colored regiments, who thought the enemy 
were making a cavalry raid ; but, owing to the 
high range taken, the bullets whistled harmlessly 
over head, and the panic soon subsided. 

During the Teche campaign, Co. E had held the 
honorable position of head-quarter guard for Gen. 
Emory, and had seldom encamped near the regi- 
ment ; but upon the withdrawal of that general to 

6 



92 THE STOEY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

New Orleans, the company returned to its proper 
position in the Thirty Eighth, and shared in all the 
labors of the siege. 

Wednesday morning, the regiment received or- 
ders to join its brigade, which had been engaged, 
farther on the left, in driving the enemy from the 
woods, and into his works. The Thirty First had 
been prominent in this skirmishing, and had lost a 
number of men. 

The battle began early on the morning of the 
27th ; and as the Thirty Eighth drew near the 
front, on the double-quick, the wounded men were 
already being carried to the rear, and the surgeons 
of the various regiments were arranging their in- 
struments on the temporary tables put up in the 
fields, not entirely out of reach of wanderhig shells. 
The sight of the glittering instruments was sug- 
gestive ; but there was no time for foreboding. 

While the Thirty Eighth was hunting in the 
woods for the brigade. Gen. Paine rode up, and 
sent it forward to support Duryca's Battery, which 
he had just placed in position on the edge of the 
woods, in front of the rebel works. Taking cover 
in rear of the guns, the regiment awaited events, 
having enthusiastically promised Gen. Paine to 
stand by the battery at all hazards. 



CHARGE ON THE WORKS. 93 

The artillery directed a heavy fire upon the for- 
tifications from various points, dismounting can- 
non, and blowing up caissons ; the skirmishers had 
worked their way up to the ditch in front of the 
breastworks, and were seen running up the em- 
bankment ; and the fire from the enemy had al- 
most ceased. It was generally believed that the 
outer line of works had been abandoned ; and the 
regiment, issuing from the rear of the battery, 
formed in line of battle, and charged on the double- 
quick ; but, on account of the ravines and fallen 
timber on each side of the roadway, the line of 
battle could not be maintained, and the order was 
given, " by the right flank," which movement was 
immediately executed. Another regiment was in 
advance, and through some misapprehension, did 
not go forward, causing the two commands to be 
mixed up, the colors being nearly side by side. 

By this time, the breastworks were fully mamicd, 
and a volley of musketry met the advancing col- 
unm ; but there was no hesitation, when^ to the 
surprise of the regiment, the order came to " lie 
down." Accustomed to obey orders promptly, the 
men dropped at once, some in the roadway, others 
in the ravines to the right and left. And now the 
enemy had it all their own way. Safe behind their 



94 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

works, they took deliberate aim at every man in that 
exposed position who showed signs of life. Lieut. 
Col. Rodman, rising to give or receive an order, 
was struck in the breast by a bullet, and fell life- 
less, the command then devolving upon Capt. Wy- 
man, of Co. B. For hours, the men in the road- 
way remained beneath the scorching sun, suflFering 
for want of water, and knowing that the least 
movement would be the signal for a death-messen- 
ger from the enemy ; yet, notwithstanding the con- 
stant artillery and musketry fire, men slept sound- 
ly at times. During the afternoon, the dry brush 
and trees in the ravines took fire, adding to the in- 
tense heat, and driving portions of the troops to 
seek new cover. The assault on other portions of 
the line had been equally unsuccessful, and the 
casualties still larger, an unusual number of com- 
manding ofiicers being among the killed ; but the 
ground was held ; and, before night, the men had 
acquired such a knowledge of the position, and 
availed themselves so thoroughly of every advan- 
tage aflForded by the ravines, that it was unsafe for 
a rebel to show his head above the breastworks. 

The casualties in the Thirty Eighth had been 
few, considering the severe fire to which it was 
exposed; and the rebels must have discharged 



FLAG OF TRUCE. 95 

their muskets at raudom. There had been three 
killed and fourteen wounded. 

The regiment remained on the field through the 
night, the dead and wountied having been taken to 
the rear before dark. A few extracts from letters 
written at the time, may perhaps give a better idea 
of the events that transpired within the following 
week, with the impressions of the men, the rumors, 
etc., than any more formal account : 

" Thursday, May, 28. . . The rebels opened 
fire this morning from their batteries, and ours re- 
plied, blowing up a caisson of ammunition inside of 
the works. A flag of truce was put up soon after, 
and the firing ceased. Both sides have been bury- 
ing the dead this forenoon ; and we have been 
lying in the ravine, near the works, the sun com- 
ing down hot. The truce will be up at two o'clock, 
I believe, when the battle will probably begin again. 

" Friday morning, 29th. The flag of truce was 
up till seven o'clock last night. There was perfect 
quiet along the entire line ; and officers and men 
were scattered over the field, looking for the dead 
and wounded, and gazing at the works in front of 
us. Two companies of the One Hundred and Six- 
tieth New York were in the ditch in front of the 
works ; and the rebels occasionally looked over. 



96 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

and chatted with them. We understood that the 
long truce was on account of some negotiations ; 
the rebels offering to surrender the place if allowed 
to march out with military honors. These terms 
were not accepted, and the truce was to terminate 
at seven. Just before that hour, we received or- 
ders to keep under cover, as the battle was to com- 
mence as soon as the flags were withdrawn. We 
watched the little white signals closely. Ours was 
taken down, and then that of the enemy was with- 
drawn. In a few minutes, the ball opened on our 
side, and, for about an hour, the roar of cannon 
and musketry was continuous. The firing gradu- 
ally died away, with the exception of a little skir- 
mishing, which was kept up during the night, with 
an occasional discharge from the batteries, to let 
them know that we were on the alert. We kept 
awake all night, ready to drive them back, if they 
attempted to cut their way through, which it was 

thought they might possibly do 

There is not much fighting this morning, although 
a bullet hums by when any one goes for water or 
shows his head above the level of the hill. 

" Saturday morning, May 30. , . . We remained 
in the ravines yesterday, the right and left wings 
of the regiment having changed position. Skir- 



BELIEVED. 97 

mishing was kept up all day, and the batteries 
were at work a portion of the time ; but the firing 
was not very heavy. A smart shower passed over 
toward evening, soaking us through, and we had 
a prospect of passing a very disagreeable night, for 
it is quite cool yet without blankets, even when 
one is dry. Just at dark, however, we were re- 
lieved by the Twelfth Maine, and sent into the 
woods in rear of the batteries." 

This three days' exposure to alternate heat and 
moisture broke down many constitutions that had 
borne up imder all the severe marching through , 
the Tdche coimtry; and men were daily sent to 
the rear, the majority of whom died before, or 
soon after, reaching Baton Rouge, to which place 
the sick and wounded men were at first sent. 
It would be impossible, in the limits of this sketch, 
to give an extended notice of all who died from 
hard service during the campaigns of the regi- 
ment; but the writer has taken pains to prepare 
a correct list, which will be found in another 
place ;. and the facts will also be appended to each 
name in its appropriate, place in the company. 

After reaching the position selected in the 
woods, the blankets were brought, and, still wet 
through, the regiment laid down to rest without 

9 



98 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

equipments on, for the first time since the morn- 
ing of the assault. 

Although the batteries kept up an occasional 
fire through the night, it did not prevent sleep; 
and even when a stray shell from the other side 
went wandering carelessly through the forest, 
making a path among the thick woods, it was 
scarcely heeded, so exhausted had the men become 
from the week's labor. 

Saturday (30th), the regiment remained in the 
rear ; and many were made glad by receiving let- 
ters from home, brought by Mr. Stacy Read, of 
Cambridge, who had come from Massachusetts to 
make inquiries into the situation of the various 
regiments from the State. At the same time, 
Maj. Richardson returned to the regiment, al- 
though not having recovered from the severe 
illness with which he had been suffering. 

The Thirty Eighth was not allowed to remain 
long in the rear. As soon as the approach of 
night shrouded the movement from the foe, the 
line was formed in the edge of the woods; and, 
cautiously marching past the batteries, taking es- 
pecial care that no loose dipper should notify the 
enemy of an approach, the regiment passed un- 
harmed over the road where it had met with 



IN THE RAVINES. 99 

such a hot reception, and took its old position 
in the ravines. This time, the blankets and shel- 
ter-tents were taken; and they were arranged so 
as to afford some protection from the rays of the 
sun. Upon entering the woods on the morning 
of the assault, the knapsacks had been left in 
charge of a guai-d, and the men had gone into the 
fight with no incumbrance but their haversacks 
and canteens ; and thus for three days they re- 
mained in the ravines in front of the works, with 
no shelter from the sun or rain. 

The rations were cooked in the woods ; and vol- 
unteers went from the quarters, and carried them 
to the several companies. While doing this, they 
were exposed to the fire of sharpshooters from be- 
hind the works, who had obtained a complete range 
of the road travelled by the ration-bearers, and who 
never failed to send their compliments, when they 
saw the coffee and meat on its way to the ravines ; 
and in this way one member of the regiment was 
killed, and one wounded. 

Not knowing at what moment the enemy might 
sally out from his works, and attempt to force his 
way through the lines, and thus escape an inevita- 
ble surrender from want of food, the troops in the 
ravines were obliged to exercise strict vigilance, 



100 THE STOBjT OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

especially during the night. Pickets were thrown 
out on the road, and one-half of the regiment kept 
awake while the other slept, all with their equip- 
ments on, and with loaded rifles by their side, ready 
for battle at the first note of alarm ; but the rebels, 
either doubting the practicability of a successful at- 
tack upon the Union lines, or waiting for outside 
assistance from Johnson, remained in their works, 
contenting themselves with sending a few shells and 
shot occasionally over the heads of the troops in the 
ravines. One rebel gun, the " Lady Davis," was 
particularly active in this work, and generally sent 
a few of her noisy messengers in the vicinity of the 
Thirty Eighth every evening. 



CHAPTEE VIII. 




Believed— Maxch to Clmton— Great Heat — Deserting s Plantation — Betum 
to Port Hudson — Assault on the 14th of June — Heayy Loss in the Thir^ 
Eighth. 

HEN the regiment went to the front the 

second time, the men expected to be re- 

lieved in twenty-four hours ; but the fourth 

¥day found them still there. On the even- 
ing of that day, they were relieved, and 
enjoyed another day's rest in the woods. 
.What followed may be learned from the following 
extract from a letter : — 

" Saturday, June 6th, 5 p. m. — We are now 
out of the din of battle which surrounds Port Hud- 
son, and went to sleep last night, for the first time 
in twelve days, without the accompaniment of can- 
non and musketry. It appears that the rebels 
have been collecting a force at Clinton, about 
twenty or thirty miles from Port Hudson, and 
have recently defeated a portion of our cavalry, 
compelling them to retreat ; and there was dan- 
ger of our supply-trains being captured. In 

9* (101) 



102 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

consequence of this, a force has been sent out, 
under command of Gen. Paine, to drive them oflF, 
or give them battle if they stand. We started 
early Friday morning; but several of the regi- 
ments took the wrong road, and we had to wait 
until they retraced their steps, and caught up with 
us. At noon, we halted for an hour or so, and 
then resumed our march ; but, while we had 
been laying in front of Port Hudson, the sun 
had been climbing up in the heavens, and it 
was found that we could not march as we had 
done. Men began to fall, all throxigh the line ; 
and the hospital stretchers were soon filled with 
them, panting for breath. The whole force was 
at once taken into the woods, where it remained 
until six o'clock in the evening, when the march 

was resumed, and kept up till nine o'clock 

We started at six this morning, and marched till 
eleven, and have been in the shade since, near a 
swift -running bayou, which aflFords an excellent 
opportunity for bathing." 

At twelve o'clock, Saturday night, the command 
was again in motion, although few had obtained 
any sleep. "We nodded as we marched along, 
and were completely lost if we halted a moment." 
Having marched to within eight miles of Clinton, 



LADY ON A RAMPAGE. 103 

the column halted, rested for a short time, and 
then faced about, and took the road back, the 
cavalry having gone ahead, and learned that the 
enemy had evacuated the town. We again quote 
from the letter : — 

" Tuesday morning, June 9. — We are again 
back in the woods opposite Port Hudson, with the 
cannon booming around us; but first, I will tell 
you a little more about our Clinton expedition. 
Friday afternoon, while on picket, I had an op- 
portunity of witnessing a scene quite common in 
Louisiana, — the desertion of a plantation by the 
whole body of slaves. Near the picket-post was a 
house, over which a guard had been placed, when 
we halted the day previous, to prevent plundering. 
The lady of the house, letting her temper get the 
better of her judgment, abused the guard, calling 
them bad names, and hoping the rebels would 
get the whole of them. The officer of the guard 
removed his men, and the household property be- 
gan rapidly to decrease, when the lady repented, 
and the guard was restored. On the return from 
Clinton, we halted near the same place ; and the 
house was again protected. There were about 
eight negro-cabins on the plantation ; and the in- 
mates were preparing to leave the old home. All 



104 THE STORY OP THE THIRTT EIGHTH. 

their worldly possessions were spread out on the 
floors of the cabins, and they were selecting a lit- 
tle bundle of the most valuable ; for people who 
travel with the Nineteenth Army Corps have to go 
in * light marching order.' One man was too old 
and lame to go ; and he wandered around among 
the busy emigrants, with a half-mournful, half-re- 
signed look. ' I'm sorry we're all gwine to leab 
ye. Uncle Joe,' said one of the men, looking up 
from his work ; ' but ye couldn't stan' de march.' — 
' No ; I can't leab,' said Uncle Joe, sadly, as he 
hobbled off to another cabin. At the door of the 
mansion, the mistress, who was so rampant yester- 
day, was selling eggs at a great price to Gen, 
Paine's cooks." 

The march back to Port Hudson was not so 
fatiguing ; and the regiment again took up a posi- 
tion in the woods, where it remained until the 
afternoon of the 13th of June, when it was re- 
moved to the edge of the woods, near the front, 
ready to take part in the grand assault which was 
announced -to take place the next day. The army 
had not been idle since the charge on the 27th of 
May. Guns had been put in position along the 
whole line, and strong works erected to protect 
them; and roadways had been worked through 



PREPARATIONS FOR ANOTHER ASSAULT. 105 

the ravines, so that sharpshooters could approach 
within rifle-shot, under cover. But the work of 
the spade was too slow ; and another assault was 
resolved upon. The order of advance was an- 
nounced to the third division as follows: The 
Eighth New Hampshire and the Fourth Wiscon- 
sin to deploy as skirmishers; the Fourth Massa- 
chusetts, and five hundred picked men, to follow 
with hand-grenades; the Thirty First Massachu- 
setts, with bags of cotton, to fill up the ditch ; and 
then the three brigades of the third division, the 
third brigade in the advance. This programme 
was somewhat changed afterward. In regard to 
a charge so interesting to the regiment, an extract 
from a letter written two days after, will be al- 
lowed to tell the story : — 

.... "We were roused a little before mid- 
night, and packed our blankets, which were to be 
left behind. Hot coffee was served out by the 
company cooks ; and, with our haversacks and 
canteens filled, we moved silently to the front. 
Many regiments were forming on the edge of the 
woods; and we expected a short, sharp fight. 
Gen. Paine himself thought that we should be in- 
side the works within half an hour, and gave 
orders that the wounded men were not to be 



106 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

removed from the field till the battle was over. 
Crossing a bridge, which had been covered with 
cotton to deaden the sound, we marched down a 
road, enclosed by thick hedges, deployed as skirm- 
ishers on an open field, and laid down. The 
centre was kept in reserve, with orders to follow 
as the right and left advanced. There were two 
regiments in front of us, deployed, and lying 
down, — the Fourth Wisconsin and the Eighth 
New Hampshire, and also a detachment of men 
from other regiments, with hand-grenades, to throw 
over the breastworks. Just behind us was the 
Fifty Third Massachusetts. As soon as we laid 
down, our artillery opened fire on the fortifica- 
tions, throwing the shot and shell over our heads ; 
but some of the shells fell short, injuring our own 
men. 

" After a brisk cannonading. Gen. Paine passed 
down the line in front, his form just visible in the 
gray of the morning, repeating to every ' group,' 
in a clear voice, * As soon as I have passed the line, 
the Fourth Wisconsin, the Eighth New Hampshire, 
and the grenadiers will go forward to the works.' 
He had scarcely reached the left of the first line, 
when the Wisconsin boys sprang up with a loud 
cheer, and dashed through the openings in the 



THE FOURTEENTH OF JUNE. 107 

hedge which screened our movements from the en- 
emy. They were followed closely by the Eighth 
and by the grenadiers. Then the general passed 
down our line, saying to every company, ' As soon 
as I give the word, the Thirty Eighth and Fifty 
Third will go forward.' Soon the order came, 
« Forward Thirty Eighth and Fifty Third/ 

*^The first shout of our advance had been an- 
swered by a volley of musketry ; and the cries of 
the wounded men told us what to expect. No one 
hesitated, however, and the two Massachusetts regi- 
ments pressed through the hedge. The distance to 
the works was farther than we had anticipated, and 
consisted of a succession of hills and ravines, 
blocked up with fallen trees, scrubby bushes, and 
brambles. As we passed the brow of every hill, we 
were exposed to a severe fire, and our men fell 
thick and fast ; yet the regiment kept on, for the 
voice of Gen. Paine was heard, in spite of the roar 
of cannon and musketry, ' Forward Thirty Eighth. 
Forward Fifty Third.' Many of the officers had 
fallen ; the nature of the ground rendered it im- 
possible to keep a line, and the four advance regi- 
ments soon became completely mixed up. Still 
they moved forward until ordered to stop. A few 
of the Wisconsin men reached the fortifications, and 



108 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

went over, where they were immediately captured ; 
others of them, and many of the Eighth New 
Hampshire, were dead in the ditch beneath the 
works. The hand-grenades had been a complete 
fgdlure, and had been thrown back by the enemy 
to make sad havoc in our own ranks. More than 
one third of the Thirty Eighth, and one quar- 
ter of the Fifty Third, lay wounded and dying, 
on the hills and in the ravines. The support did 
not come up ; and that voice which had inspired 
the whole movement was no longer heard. What- 
ever chance of success there may have been at the 
outset, the fall of Gen. Paine destroyed it. And 
now, almost without oflBoers, the men sought cover 
from the enemy's rifles on the slopes of the hills, 
and returned the fire whenever an opportunity of- 
fered. The One Hundred and Thirty Third New 
York, with its brave colonel leading, made a gal- 
lant attempt to retrieve the disasters of the day ; 
but the fall of Col. Ourrie, and the heavy fire 
poured into the regiment, caused it to seek shelter. 
The Thirty First Massachusetts had advanced some 
distance with the cotton-bags, with which they made 
breastworks, and held a position in fipont of the 
fortifications during the day, having over thirty 
men killed and wounded. 



FOUBTEENTH OP JUNE. 109 

Major Richardson, just returned from the hospital, 
and still suffering from iUness, had been obliged to 
leave the field, and the command devolved upon 
Oapt. Wyman, who, in turn, was partially disabled 
by a piece of shell, which shattered his sabre, and 
bruised his leg. Lieut. Holmes had been killed, 
and Lieuts. Spear, Russell of Co. F, Russell of Co. 
D, Bullard, and Jackson, were wounded. In all, 
ninety-one of the two hundred and fifty who formed 
in line that morning had been killed or wounded. 
All day, the regiment, scattered in groups over the 
field,' remained beneath the scorching sun, suffering 
for water, and exposed to the fire from their own 
batteries in the rear, as well as from those of the 
enemy in front. 

Water could only be procured from a few mud- 
holes in the ravines ; and the paths leading to them 
were commanded by the rebel works, the numerous 
dead and wounded men in the vicinity telling how 
dangerous was the attempt to reach them. For a 
long time, Gen. Paine, who had been shot in the leg, 
remained behind a log, every attempt to carry him 
off the field being the signal for a volley from the 
enemy, who knew that some prominent oflBcer must 
be the object of so much solicitude. 

The stretcher corps were repeatedly fired upon. 

10 



110 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Two colored men had succeeded in getting to the 
extreme front with a stretcher, and were endeavor- 
ing to take oflF a fallen soldier (supposed, at the 
time, to belong to Co. I, of the Thirty Eighth), 
when they were fired upon, and both fell wounded. 
One of them tried to get away, and was again shot 
down ; and, making a second attempt, received a 
third wouud. But the longest day must have an 
end ; and darkness at length kindly came, and hid 
from sight the terrible scenes of that sad Sunday. 
During the evening, the few remaining oflBcers 
gathered the scattered groups together ; and, about 
midnight, the regiment withdrew from the field, 
not, however, without a parting volley from the 
rebels, who heard the movement. 

The day after the battle, attempts were made 
to recover the bodies of those who had fallen ; 
but, as the rebels had command of the field, 
all of them could not be reached. Toward even- 
ing, members of Co. F succeeded, after a long 
search among the dead men, in finding the bodies 
of Sergt. Angell and Corp. Champney, and by 
torchlight laid them quietly to rest under the 
magnolias near their quarters, beside another of 
their comrades, Joseph A. Morris, whose body had 
been recovered early in the day. 



CASUALTIES. Ill 

It would swell our sketch to an unwieldy size to 
record the names and good qualities of all those 
fell on this day, or of the wounded who passed 
weary months on hospital beds. Those who saw 
them know how well they did their duty. In an- 
other place, will be found a full list of the «asnal- 
ties. 




CHAPTEE IX. 

After the Battle — Great Midi — Burial of the Dead — BemoTe into the Bayines 
— Deserters — Pall of Vicksburg — Surrender of Port Hudson — A Disap- 
pointment — Stores Plains — Night March to Baton Rouge — Embark for 
Donaldsyille — Dress Parades — Six Months* Pay. 

^^ 

N the 15th, the long-looked for mail ar- 
rived, with the letters that had been accu- 
mulating at New Orleans for weeks ; and 
then wounds and sickness were momentari- 
ly forgotten in the pleasure of again com- 
muning with those at home. The letters 
averaged seven or eight to each man ; and some 
had over a dozen; but it was sad to think how 
many would be returned imopened, to strike a chill 
to the hearts of the writers. 

The wounded men were sent to Baton Rouge 
and New Orleans, and the field -hospitals made 
ready for a new lot of patients ; for, notwithstand- 
ing the failure of the assault, the siege still went 
on. 

But few of the Union dead had been brought 
from the field; and four days they laid beneath 
that summer sun before a truce was arranged, and 

(112) 



SUPPORTING BATTERIES. 118 

the bodies buried. Previous to burial, they were 
placed in rows, to the number of over a hundred ; 
but it was impossible to recognize them, except by 
some mark on theu' clothing, or, as was the case 
with the body of Lieut. Holmes, by articles found 
in the pockets. 

The Thirty Eighth remained in the woods until 
the 19th (five days), when it was again removed 
to the front to support batteries, relieving the 
Thirteenth Connecticut, who had excavated holes 
in the side of the ravines, safe from bullets as long 
as the head was kept below the crest of the hill ; 
but a gauntlet had to be run every time one went 
for water, or to the cook-houses in the woods. In 
the meantime, spades were again in the ascendant ; 
trenches had been dug almost up to the earth- 
works of the enemy; and sharpshooters were 
posted all through the ravines, so that it was 
a dangerous matter for a rebel to raise his head 
above the embankment. The batteries daily and 
nightly threw their missiles inside of the fortress, 
giving the enemy no rest; and such an accurate 
range had been obtained, that rebel guns were dis- 
mounted as soon as put in position. 

Deserters came over occasionally, with stories of 
scarcity of food, and that the only hope of Gen. 

10* 



114 THE STOKY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH, 

Gardner was in outside relief; and that if Vicks- 
burg fell, and Grant be thus enabled to turn his 
attention to Johnson, Port Hudson would fall at 
once. Although his army was rapidly diminish- 
ing, by casualties and the diseases incident to the 
climate and the season, Gen. Banks still pressed 
the siege vigorously, encouraging the men by his 
presence and by appeals to their patriotism and 
courage ; and a storming party was organized and 
drilled to take the lead in a new assault. 

But stirring news was at hand, which was to 
crush all the hope of the garrison in receiving 
help from Johnson, and leave them in the hands 
of those who had toiled so hard for the prize. On 
the 7th of July, the tidings of the fall of Vicksburg 
was received, and published through the camps ; 
and as it spread from regiment to regiment, till it 
reached those almost directly beneath the works, 
one shout of exultation arose, giving the enemy 
an intimation of the speedy close of the struggle. 
Early on the morning of the 8th, an order from 
Gen. Banks was received by all the regimental 
commanders, stating that Gen. Gardner had pro- 
posed a cessation of hostilities, with a view to set- 
tling the terms of surrender, if Gen. Banks could 
satisfy him that Vicksburg had fallen. Preparsr 



SURRENDER OP PORT HUDSON. 115 

tions for the attack were still to go on, but the 
general wished all active demonstrations to cease ; 
and, in a little while, flags of truce were put up, 
and the men, who had been opposed to each other 
so long, met at the breastworks, and carried on. a 
brisk trade, swapping hard-tack for corn-cakes, and 
exchanging tin canteens for wooden ones. The 
battles were discussed freely, but perfect good 
humor was maintained on both sides; and the 
rebels freely passed over their corn-beer to their 
late antagonists. The Fifteenth Arkansas had oc- 
cupied that part of the works opposite the post of 
the Thirty Eighth, and had scarcely left the front 
for thirty days ; and this was the second time they 
were to surrender, the whole regiment having been 
captured at Donelson. 

Gen. Gardner surrendered unconditionally, and 
preparations were made to take possession at once 
of the fort. Two regiments from each division 
were selected to go inside, and assist at the formal 
surrender of the stronghold; and, in the third 
division, that honor fell upon the Eighth New 
Hampshire and the Thirty Eighth Massachusetts. 
This indorsement of their conduct by the com- 
manding general was especially gratifying to the 
regiment ; but they were not destined to see the 



116 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

inside of those famous works; for, on the after- 
noon of the 8th, a storm came up, and the 
ceremonies • of the formal surrender were post- 
poned until the next day; and, at midnight, the 
regiment was called up, and sent, with the brigade, 
to Stores Plains, five miles from Port Hudson, to 
relieve Dudley's brigade, which had been ordered 
to Donaldsonville, yhere the defeated army of 
Taylor, having reassembled, were assuming the of- 
fensive. The regiment remained at Stores Plains 
until the 11th, the complete quiet which reigned 
seeming almost unnatural, so long had thoy been 
accustomed to the almost constant discharge of 
cannon and musketry; and, on the afternoon of 
that day, the brigade received orders to report at 
Baton Rouge. All night the regiment marched, 
reaching the capital as the sun arose above the 
housetops; and then sought shelter from the in- 
tense heat during the day as best it could. This 
night-march, after having burrowed so long in the 
holes at Port Hudson, told heavily on the men ; 
and many, who had been on duty during the 
whole campaign, broke down, and fell out of the 
ranks. 

On the 15th, the regiment embarked on trans- 
ports, in company with the One Hundred and 



DONALDSONVILLE. 117 

Twenty Eighth and One Hundred and Seventy 
Fifth New York, and arrived at Donaldsonville 
that evening; one small boat affording sufficient 
room for the three regiments. Only four or five 
officers accompanied the regiment, some having 
been wounded, and others having obtained fur- 
loughs to visit New Orleans and the North ; so that 
the regiment made rather a ludicrous appearance 
on parade, with one field, one staff, and two line 
officers, four headless dnuns, and two hundred 
ragged men. K the dress-parades did not afford 
much satisfaction, the excellent bathing facilities 
did; and all day the river was alive with men 
who thus sought refuge from the intense heat 
which prevailed. 

On the 25th, the paymaster appeared, after a six 
months' absence; and soon the regiment formed 
itself into an irregular triangle; one side being 
composed by the line marching to the paymaster's 
tent, the other side by a long procession on their 
way to the sutlers, and the base by the returning 
crowd on their way to their quarters, with arm- 
ftds of cheese, gingerbread, pickles, etc. The 
health of the regiment was very poor at this time, 
nearly every one being afiiicted with a species of 
scurvy sore, the consequence of an almost entire 



118 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

abstinence from vegetables for so long a time; 
and, for some days after the arrival of the pay- 
master, the army rations were hardly touched. 
This state of things was, of course, very gratify- 
ing to the sutlers, and to the numerous corn- 
beer and gingerbread venders, whose stands 
sprung up like mushrooms, all over the town, 
as soon as the troops were paid. 




CHAPTER X. 

Back to Baton Rouge — The Highland Road — Camp Rodman —Bivouac on the 
Boulevards —A and K detailed for Provost Duty — I sent to Plaquemine — 
Camp Banks — Picket Duty — Cold Weather — New Years' Ball — Visit of 
Mr. Wellington — Flag Raismg — Recruits. 

UGUST 1, the regiment embarked for Baton 
Rouge, landed, and went into camp near 
the Highland Road, just outside of the 
city, when clothing was issued, and the 
men once more had an opportunity to ap- 
pear decently. From this time until the 
following February, the history of the regiment 
presents no striking features ; but it was far from 
being idle. 

On the 2d of September, a large portion of the 
troops at Baton Rouge embarked for what was 
then supposed to be a Texan expedition ; and the 
Thirty Eighth was ordered out to guard the 
streets leading from the levee, and prevent any of 
the men from leaving their command, — an un- 
pleasant duty at all times. A few days after, the 
regiment changed camp, moving near the city, 
on the ground recently occupied by the Forty 

(119) 



120 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Ninth Massachusetts, and calling their new loca- 
tion " Camp William L. Rodman." This camp 
was just outside the line of works surrounding 
Baton Rouge ; and, upon a threatened attack one 
night from the bands of guerillas who hovered 
around the lines continually, the camp was aban- 
doned, with the tents standing, while the regiment 
bivouacked on the boulevards in the city until 
mornmg ; when, there being no prospect of an en- 
gagement, it once more returned to its quarters. 

The Thirty First Massachusetts having been sent 
to New Orleans for the purpose of being mounted, 
the Thirty Eighth removed into the vacant camp 
(Camp Banks) on the 10th of December. Cos. A 
and K were detailed as provost guard, and had 
quarters in the city, whei;e they were eflScient in 
preserving order, and gave satisfaction alike to the 
commander of the post and to the inhabitants of 
the city, who were protected in all legitimate busi- 
ness, and who ever found the men of these two 
companies courteous and polite when on duty, and 
quiet and peaceable at all times. Co. I was sta- 
tioned at Plaquemine, a portion of the company 
being moimted; and, in conjimction with the 
Fourth Wisconsin Cavalry, they did efficient ser- 
vice in guarding that town against the incursions 



CONTRABAND GOODS. 121 

of the guerillas, who harassed the few people dis- 
posed to render allegiance to the government, and 
took every opportunity to capture wagon-trains, 
and shoot those who ventured outside of the lines. 
The remaining companies picketed a portion of the 
line, did guard-duty in the commissary and other 
departments, and furnished men to act as clerks 
and orderlies, and do other duties incident to the 
garrisoning of such an important post; while a 
number oi the officers held important positions on 
the staffs of the post and brigade commanders. 

No articles whatever were allowed to be taken 
outside of the lines without a permit; and the 
pickets were instructed to use great care in ex- 
amining all parties ; but it became a delicate task 
occasionally, when some fair-lookmg dame, taking 
advantage of the respect ever shown to woman by 
the members of the regiment, attempted to " run 
the blockade." On more than one occasion, 
where the suspicions were unusually strong, a 
gentle shaking brought strange appendages to 
the ground, to the confusion of the owner, and 
the amusement of the boys ; and a close examin- 
ation of the seats and bottoms of vehicles often 
brought to light articles not on the permits. 

As the year drew to a close, the weather be- 
u 



122 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

came cold ; and, during Christmas-week, the pick- 
ets often found the water in their canteens frozen 
in the morning, and their beards white with the 
frost. The citizens complained of the cold also, 
saying that such weather had not been seen in 
Baton Rouge for twenty years, and that the 
Yankees had brought their climate down with 
them; which may have been true, for they had 
established some customs quite as uncongenial to 
the South as the cold weather. It w^s reported 
that one chivalrous citizen, after taking the oath, 
with the intention of supporting the government, 
became so disgusted at seeing a sign hung out, 
stating that doughnuts and baked beans were to 
be had within, that he immediately left for some 
country where New England and her famous 
dishes were unheard off. 

The health of the regiment was remarkably 
good through the winter, some companies report- 
ing every man for duty, notwithstanding the fact 
that they were on picket twice a week, exposed to 
all the storms of the season ; but the quarters in 
the camp were comfortable, consisting of board 
shanties, three to four feet high at the sides, with 
tent-roofs, and furnished with stoves, bunks, and 
stools. By this time, the men began to consider 



GUERILLA ALARMS. 128 

themselves veterans, making it a point to look out 
for personal conveniences ; and, as a consequence, 
" household stuff" accumulated, so that whenever 
the regiment broke camp, they left a variety of 
articles, valuable in the eyes of the contrabands. 

On New Year's, a ball took place under the 
direction of Co. A, then doing provost duty in 
the city; but the sympathies* of the people were 
still with the bands of guerillas prowling about 
outside of the lines, and they held themselves 
aloof from Union officers and men ; so that the 
ball was not graced by the presence of many 
ladies. During the winter, J. C. Wellington, 
Esq., of Cambridge, who had been commissioned 
by the governor of Massachusetts to visit all the 
regiments from that State then in the Department 
of the Gulf, spent a number of days in the camp, 
conforming to army life, and making himself famil- 
iar with the condition of the regiment. 

During the first week in January, the alarms 
occasioned by guerillas were unusually frequent; 
and the regiment was under arms several times, 
the pickets doubled, and preparations made to re^ 
pel an assault ; but the enemy never came within 
musket -shot of the breastworks, although they 
captured detached parties. For several weeks. 



124 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

the brigade stood under arms from daylight until 
after sunrise ; while the pickets deployed in a 
skirmish line; but the guerillas never fulfilled 
their threat of dining in Baton Rouge. 

Wednesday, Feb. 27, the Fourth Wisconsin Cav- 
alry raised a new flag in their camp, celebrating 
the event with music and speeches, and the Thirty 
Eighth were invited to be present, with other regi- 
ments. They appeared with full ranks, to the evi- 
dent gratification of the Fourth; and from this 
time, the good feeling between the two regiments, 
which had been partially interrupted by an unfor- 
tunate affair between a member of the Fourth and 
one of the provost guards, resulting in the death 
of the former, was restored. On the 3d of Feb- 
ruary, the One Hundred and Twenty Eighth New 
York raised a new flag, with appropriate ceremo- 
nies, reminding the spectators of the early times 
of the war, when patriotism expressed itself in 
bunting. 

The rebels still hovered around the picket-line ; 
and on the 8th of February, Lieut. Williams, one 
of the most daring of the Wisconsin officers, was 
killed just outside of the lines, several of his men 
being wounded at the same time, and the detach- 
ment which accompanied him driven back. His 



A SCRUB-RACE. 125 

regiment immediately started in pursuit, and 
captured several of the enemy; while the third 
brigade were under arms behind the breastworks. 

Feb. 7, the Thirty Eighth and the One Hun- 
dred and Fifty Sixth marched to the stockade, 
seven or eight miles from the city ; and, on the 
march back, a scrub-race took place between the 
two regiments, — molasses versus sour-krout, as 
the boys called it, — molasses coming in slightly 
ahead. 

March 11, a number of recruits joined the regi- 
ment, for the first time in its history; the Depart- 
ment of the Gulf evidently not being in favor 
among the latter volunteers. 

It should have been mentioned before, that the 
ladies of Cambridge, during the summer, had pro- 
cured a very handsome silk flag, with the name 
of the regiment, and the engagements in which it 
had taken part, inscribed upon it in golden letters. 
This flag was forwarded to. Baton Rouge, and en- 
trusted to the care of the regiment by Major Allen, 
who read a very eloquent and patriotic letter from 
the donors, and also read the reply which was to 
be sent in the name of the regiment. Five more 

battles were afterward placed upon its stripes. 
11* 



CHAPTER XI. 

The Spring Campaign— Leave Baton Rouge — Port Hudson again— Fort de 
-Russy — Red River Country — Alexandria — I>eparture of the Army for 
Shreveport— The Second Division left at Alexandria — Disaster — The 
Thirty Eighth embark on the Mittie Stephens — Guerilla Attack — Grand 
Ecore. 

HE campaign had already opened on the 
Red River, with the capture of Fort de 
Russy by Gen. A. J. Smith ; and a batch 
^JT'^ "^f three hundred prisoners had been sent 
|g3 to Baton Rouge, and thence to New Or- 




leans. The Seventh and Twenty Second 
Kentucky Regiments had arrived to garrison the 
post ; and the third brigade daily expected orders 
to prepare for the field. 

On the 21st of March, the ever-welcome face of 
the paymaster was seen in camp, the regiment 
receiving two months' pay ; and the next day, the 
surplus baggage was packed, the campaign coflFee 
and sugar bags made, the detailed men returned 
to their several companies, the cartridge-boxes 
filled, and everything made ready to start at a 
moment's notice. The regiment had become well 
accustomed to river-steamers by this time ; and, as 

(126) 



THE MISSISSIPPI AGAIN. 127 

the regimental baggage had been cut down from 
its former huge proportions, breaking camp was 
now a comparatively easy task, consequently, there 
was but little delay after reaching the levee ; and 
at noon of the 23d, the transport left Baton Rouge, 
and steamed up the river. Much interest was 
manifested to see Port Hudson from the river- 
side ; and that place, so famous in the annals of 
the Thirty Eighth, was reached in time to see the 
setting sun cast its rays on the glistening musket 
of the Corps d'Afrique sentinel, who walked his 
beat on its ramparts. The regiment had now been 
in front of Port Hudson, and to the rear of it, and 
on all sides of it, but were never destined to enter 
its works. 

Leaving the Mississippi, the steamer entered the 
Red River, and, on the afternoon of the 24th, 
passed Fort de Russy, a grim-looking structure, 
but now in the hands of its rightful owners ; while 
those two old Mississippi mud-turtles, the Benton 
and the Essex, lay silently at anchor, pictures of 
war in repose. The country of the Red River 
presents a striking contrast to that of the Missis- 
sippi. For miles, the traveller sails on, through an 
almost unbroken forest, the river taking a new 
turn every few yards. Occasionally a clearing 



128 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

comes in sight, in the centre of which stands a 
dilapidated building, apparently engaged in a per- 
petual conflict with the laws of gravitation ; a few 
cattle and long-nosed hogs, and a great many lank 
dogs, roam about the apology for a garden ; while 
groups of flaxen-headed children peer out of the 
doorways. It is the country of the poor whites, 
where labor is considered degrading, where educa- 
tion is unknown, and where Northern enterprise 
has never penetrated. But the North-western 
farmer boys have looked on tliis rich soil ; the 
North-western and the Noi*th-eastern lumbermen 
have felled the tall trees near the river-bank ; the 
mechanics of Massachusetts and New York have 
seen the field for improved implements in hus- 
bandry and in domestic life ; and ere many years 
this distant Southern country will put on a new 
life, and be the seat of an educated, industrious 
people. 

The boat reached Alexandria at midnight, and, 
the next morning the regiment disembarked, and 
went into camp three miles beyond the city. The 
place was full of troops, belonging to the Thirteenth 
Corps, who had been in Texas, and had marched 
up through the Tdche country ; the Sixteenth and 
Seventeenth Corps, who had captured De Russy ; 



BIVOUAC BY THE SUGAR-MILL. 129 

the Nineteenth Corps, a portion of whom had been 
in the department so long that they had become 
fully acclimated ; and one or two brigades of col- 
ored troops — mostly Louisianians. The third 
brigade of the second division was selected to gar- 
rison Alexandria, while the main body of the army 
moved up the country toward Shreveport; and 
the Thirty Eighth removed to one of the vacated 
camps, falling heir to the stock of boards collected 
by the Western men, who were adepts in building 
shantees. 

April 1, the regiment again broke camp, moving 
nearer the centre of the city ; and as Gen. Grover, 
of the second division, had command of the post 
at Alexandria, and the army having met with but 
slight opposition in its march toward Shreveport, 
it was thought that the third brigade would go no 
farther. At Alexandria, in addition to picket, the 
regiment did much fatigue duty, — lugging oats, 
corn, hard -tack, etc., up the steep banks of the 
levee, working nights as well as days. Beside the 
white and black soldiers, there was an appendix to 
the army at Alexandria, consisting of a body of 
gray-coated scouts, natives of this portion of the 
country, acquainted with all the by-ways and the 
hiding-places of the rebels, who went out and in at 



130 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

their pleasure, and who were looked upon rather 
uneasily at times by the troops, although confidence 
was placed in them by Gen. Banks. 

For some days, the reports from the moving 
army and navy were all favorable ; the rebels were 
in full retreat, abandoning their strongholds, and 
falling back upon Shreveport, where they were to 
find Gen. Steele in their rear, and the whole trans- 
Mississippi coimtry was to fall into the hands of the 
Union generals. Suddenly, there was a pause in 
the news; then ominous whispers of disaster; 
finally a full confirmation of the ill-tidings, — 
Nims's, the Chicago, and a regular battery taken ; 
the newly-mounted infantry regiments defeated 
and demoralized ; the Thirteenth corps cut to 
pieces, and heavy losses in the Nineteenth ; with 
the entire army on the defensive. All thoughts 
of summer .quarters in Alexandria were at an 
end ; and on the 12th, the regiment struck tents, 
marched a few miles beyond the town, and em- 
barked on board the Mittie Stephens, to join the 
army above. The boat steamed on until midnight, 
when the low state of the water, and the frequent 
turns in the river, rendered it imprudent to go fur- 
ther; and a halt was made beside the bank, a 
picket being thrown out to guard against guerillas. 



ATTACK BY GUEBILLA8. 181 

Starting at daylight in the morning, the boat pro- 
ceeded on her course, without incident until noon, 
making rather slow progress against the current. 
As usual, when on a transport, the men were scat- 
tered about the vessel, making coffee, eating, sleep- 
ing, and reading, not a gun loaded, the equipments 
and knapsacks piled up promiscuously, and the 
officers all in the cabin. Every one felt as secure 
as if sailing up Boston Harbor, when suddenly a 
gunshot was heard ; and before a minute had 
elapse 1, a shower of bullets poured into the boat, 
rattling against the smoke-pipe, smashing the 
cabin-windows, and whistling by the heads of the 
astonished men. Taken completely by surprise, 
away from their guns and equipments, and no 
enemy in sight, for a few moments there was some 
confusion; but the men soon rallied, and poured 
several volleys into the woods, although, as the 
boat kept on her course, the fire was probably 
ineffectual. 

Considering that the regiment was fiilly exposed, 
and the enemy perfectly secure in his hiding-place, 
the casualties were remarkably few. One man, 
sick in the cabin, and lying on a sofa, was instantly 
killed, and one officer and two men wounded. 
Another attack was expected at the next bend of 



132 THE STOET OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

the river, and preparations were made to meet it ; 
but nothing further occurred, and, within an hour 
or two, the Union pickets were seen on the bank 
of the river, and the steamer soon reached Grand 
Ecore, where the Nineteenth Army Corps was 
encamped. A boat crowded with captured gray- 
coats lay in the stream; and as the Mittie Ste- 
phens passed her, the Union men, feeling in bad 
humor over the guerilla attack, exulted a little ; 
but the rebels shouted back the taunts defiantly, 
and pointed up the river. 

The brigade being still at Alexandria, the Thirty 
Eighth was temporarily assigned to the second 
brigade of the third division, commanded by Brig. 
Gen. Birge ; and during the two or three days suo- 
ceeding, the camp was twice changed again, before 
a proper position was found. 




CHAPTEE XII. 

Grand Ecore — What caivied the Repulse ? — Retreat through the Pine Woods — 
Battle of Cane River — Rear Guard — The Retreat continued — Arrival at 
Alexandria. 

"I HE greater portion of Gen. Banks's army 
was then at Grand Ecore, and busily at 
work throwing up breastworks, — the pine 
forests furnishing abundant logs for the 
purpose, — while the river was crowded 
with gun-boats and transports. Of course 
the recent battles were the general topics dis- 
cussed, and there appeared to be as many opinions 
regarding the details as there were soldiers present. 
The Western ofl&cers and men laid the blame of 
the repulse on the Eastern generals ; the infantry , 
charged it on the cavalry, the artillery on the in- 
fantry support ; the navy on the army. But there 
were a few general facts on which all the stories 
agreed, and which may be stated in the following 
order : 1st. The rebels having steadily fallen back 
before the advance of the Union army, neither offi- 
cers nor men expected a serious opposition until 
the works at Shreveport were reached, by which 
12 a88) 



134 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

time it was supposed that Gen. Steele would be 
ready to cooperate ; consequently, the advance was 
taken by surprise when they found the entire force 
of the enemy stopping their path. 2d. A portion 
of the cavalry had been but recently mounted; 
and men who were excellent infantry soldiers when 
armed with infantry weapons, being obliged to dis- 
mount in the woods, found their cavalry equip- 
ments a great hindrance. 3d. This imperfect 
cavalry, with a few light batteries, and a small 
infantry support, was separated by four or five 
hours' march from the Nineteenth Corps, with the 
cavalry baggage-train well up to the front, and 
blocking up the road between. 4th. The Six- 
teenth and Seventeenth Corps were not within 
supporting distance of the other portion of the 
army. These statements were made by scores of 
men at the time, and are substantially embodied in 
the Adjutant General's reports of the various 
Massachusetts' regiments engaged in the expedi- 
tion. Although the fall of the water in the Eed 
River made it necessary to retreat from Grand 
Ecore, the repulse at Sabine Cross Roads was 
a purely military disaster, — the result of a dis- 
position of the forces which invited attack. Others 
may apportion the blame, and say who was respon- 



NIMS'S BATTERY. 135 

sible for the lives of the men sacrificed in this dis- 
astrous campaign ; the failure did not result from 
lack of courage in either the Eastern or Western 
portions of the army. During the second Red 
River expedition, the Army of the Gulf did not 
have that confidence in some of its commanders 
so essential to success. The troops thought it bad 
enough to get the condemned hard-tack of the 
Army of the Potomac, without having its con- 
denmed generals; and Emory and Weitzel and 
Paine and Grover, under Gen. Banks, were con- 
sidered competent to lead them to victory as they 
had done the year before. 

As some relief to the disasters, all concurred in 
awarding great honor to Nims's Battery, which, with 
double-shotted guns, mowed down the ranks of 
the advancing rebels while their ammimition lasted, 
and only attempted to save themselves when their 
horses were shot and there was no possibility of 
getting their pieces off the field. The Nineteenth 
Corps, also, acted as became it, and taught the 
enemy, that although repulsed, the Army of the 
Gulf was not demoralized; while the Sixteenth 
and Seventeenth Corps sustained the reputation 
they had acquired under Gen. Grant. 

Extensive breastworks were erected at Grand 



136 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Ecore, each regiment building opposite its own 
line ; so that the whole camp was soon' enclosed, in 
anticipation of an attack. 

Thursday, April 16, a detail of one hundred 
men being called for from the regiment, Cos. C, 
G, and H, were selected, and sent to guard a trans- 
port on her passage down the river ; and the next 
day the regiment again changed camp. But the 
water was rapidly falling ; it began to be whispered 
that a large force was collecting on the river below, 
to cut off all supplies ; and the news of the do- 
feat of Gen. Steele was confirmed. On the 21st, 
marching orders were received; and the entire 
army prepared to evacuate Grand Ecore, and 
retreat to Alexandria. As a rapid march was ex- 
pected, with the probability of having to fight all 
the way down, everything superfluous was de- 
stroyed, and blankets, overcoats, extra clothing, 
and relics went to feed the flames which were 
rising in every direction through the pine woods. 
Not a hard-tack box was left for the enemy ; and 
their only spoils of war consisted in the well con- 
structed line of breastworks surrounding the en- 
campment. 

The sick men were put on board of transports ; 
and at five o'clock in the afternoon, the retreat 



EVACUATION OF GRAND EOORE. 187 

began, the Nineteenth Corps in advance. Work- 
ing its way slowly through the immense wagon- 
train, the third brigade took the road through the 
pine woods, in which large fires had been built to 
guide the men in picking their way among the 
stumps. The Thirteenth Corps followed the Nine- 
teenth ; and the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Corps, 
imder the command of Gen. A. J. Smith, brought 
up the rear. The advance marched till four 
'o'clock in the morning, through woods and 
plains, and then went into camp, having made 
over twenty-five miles ; while far in the rear, the 
lurid light of burning barns and mills told where 
the Western soldiers, thinking of the tortures of 
their fifty thousand comrades in the prisons of 
Virginia and Carolina, were making war with 
ungloved hands. 

The march was continued the next day; and, 
in the twenty -four hours after leaving Grand 
Ecore, forty miles had been travelled. But the 
enemy, who had been exulting over the antici- 
pated capture of Gen. Banks and his entire army, 
were not disposed to let the prize slip through 
their fingers so easily; and on the morning of 
the 23d of April, as the Nineteenth Corps were 
marching along the banks of Cane River, near the 

12* 



138 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

crossing, the rebels opened with artillery on the 
advance. The infantry at once formed in Ime of 
battle, in the road and the adjoining fields, while 
the light batteries were sent to the front, followed 
by Gen. Banks and stafi*. After a brisk cannon- 
ading with little apparent result, a body of troops, 
under command of Gen. Birge, was sent across 
the river, — the detachment of the third brigade, 
led by Col. Smith, of the One Hundred and 
Twenty Eighth New York, being the first to ford 
the stream. Climbing up the steep banks, the 
brigade entered the woods, and, marching through 
a swamp, came in the rear of the enemy, when 
the Thirty Eighth was sent forward in advance 
to skirmish, and ascertain the position of the 
rebels. Moving steadily forward through woods 
and across open fields, occasionally receiving a 
shot from a concealed enemy, the regiment passed 
a narrow stream, skirmished up a thickly wooded 
hill, and down its descending slope, till a rail-fence 
was reached, bounding a cleared piece of ground, 
beyond which was another wooded bluflf, showing 
signs of rebel occupancy. A halt was made be- 
hind this fence, while the reserve formed in the 
rear, and dismounted cavalry was sent into the 
woods on the right to reconnoitre. The order 



BATTLE OF CANE RIVEE. 139 

" Forward " soon came ; and the Thirty Eighth, 
still deployed, went over the fence, and charged 
the hill under a heavy fire. Thanks to Gen. 
Birge, the regiment was not tlirown forward im- 
supported. Emerging from the woods, the Thir- 
tieth Maine and the One Hundred and Sixty Sec- 
ond and the One Hundred and Sixty Fifth New 
York followed the skirmishers, in a magnificent 
line of battle, charging across the open field and 
up the blufiF, from which, after a short resistance, 
the rebels retreated precipitately, leaving a portion 
of their dead and wounded on the ground. 

Reforming the lines, and being strongly rein- 
forced, the column advanced through the woods 
to another opening, with a hill beyond similar to 
the one just taken, and where it was expected the 
enemy would make a more stubborn resistance; 
but when the charge was made in lines of battle, 
with fixed bayonets, no foe was found, and the 
road to the river was clear. 

That night the regiment encamped near the spot 
where it had crossed in the morning; and glad 
enough were the men to unsling the knapsacks 
which they had carried all day, and gather around 
the camp-fires, to discuss the battle, while they pre- 
pared their simple supper. 



140 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

The casualties had been comparatively few, the 
close ranks of the support furnishing a fairer 
target than the skirmish-line. Capt. Julius M. 
Lathrop, of Co. I, was mortally wounded, and 
died a few days afterward. Capt. Lathrop had 
rode in an ambulance the day previous, unable to 
march ; but, upon the approach of an engagement, 
had taken command of his company, and was lead- 
ing his men when he received the fatal shot. The 
regiment lost two killed and eight wounded, the 
greater part of the wounded men dying during the 
summer. 

As soon as the enemy was driven off, a pontoon 
bridge was thrown across the river, and the wagon- 
trains and the batteries passed over. The Nine- 
teenth Corps had continued the march during the 
night, followed by the Thirteenth Corps ; and the 
next morning the One Himdred and Twenty 
Eighth marched on, leaving the Thirty Eighth 
with the Western corps, who had been engaged 
with the enemy in the morning, and who reached 
the crossing as the rear of the other corps left it. 

An immense number of contrabands, of all ages, 
sizes, and colors, came in with Gen. Smith, laden 
down with bundles, hastily packed up as they 
deserted the plantation, and left old massa and 



EXODUS FROM BONDAGE. 141 

missus to hoe their own corn and bake their own 
hoecakes. Some were mounted on mules, and 
some had rigged up old mule -carts, and filled 
them with bags of clothes, iron pots, and babies. 
An artist would have found many subjects worthy 
of his pencil in the quaint procession; and one 
group impressed itself very vividly upon the mind 
of the present writer. A woman, with an im- 
mense bundle on her head, was leading a mule 
by a rope-halter, walking with as stately a tread 
as did ever Cleopatra. Astride of the mule were 
two little children, the foremost one holding on to 
a large bundle, the other clasping her companion's 
waist. The children were neatly dressed, the long 
fringe on their straw hats partially shading their 
faces, while their eyes were steadily fixed on their' 
mother ; and the complexion of the whole party 
told of other than African blood. 

The appearance of these contrabands reminded 
the spectator of the exodus of the Israelites from 
Egypt ; for, like the ancient fugitives from slavery, 
these modem ones had evidently borrowed largely 
from their masters and mistresses, and many a 
gay parasol and lace mantle spoke of the man- 
sion rather than the cabin. They were illy pre- 
pared, however, with such loads, to accompany a 



142 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

retreating army, closely pursued by its foes ; and, 
either by the advice or command of some wise 
officer, a sifting of their effects took place at the 
crossing, and a portion of their burdens was left 
behind. The Western boys rigged themselves in 
the cast-off bonnets and gowns, and the Sixteenth 
and Seventeenth Corps looked like a masquerading 
party as they filed across the pontoon. 

For some unexplained reason, the Thirty Eighth 
was detained to support a battery, until the whole 
army had crossed the river, and the pontoon was 
taken up, when the battery moved on, and the 
regiment followed. Everything now in the rear 
was rebel; and the unfortunate soldier who fell 
out had a fair chance of seeing Galveston via 
Shreveport. The enemy followed, and had con- 
stant skirmishes with the cavalry ; but the infantry 
was not again engaged ; and, after three days hard 
marching, partly through the pine woods, the regi- 
ment entered Alexandria on the afternoon of the 
26th, and went into camp near the place from 
which it had started fourteen days previously, 
finding a large mail awaiting it, much to its 
gratification. 




CHAPTEE XIII. 

The Fleet in Danger — Red Rirer Dammed — Foraging Expedition —Departure 
firom Alexandria — Captured Mails — Battle of Mansura Plains — Scarcity 
of Water — On the Old Road — Reach the Atchafalaya — Engagement in 
the Rear. 

pLTHOUGH the army had thus reached 
Alexandria in safety, the fleet was still 
above the rapids, and there appeared to 
be no prospect of the river rising. The 
enemy were busily at work on the lower 
part of the river, throwing up earthworks ; 
and in a short time all communication was cut off, 
and several transports captured, one of which con- 
tained a large mail sent from Alexandria upon the 
arrival of the army at that place. 

But there were men in the Nineteenth Corps to 
whom obstacles only brought increased energy; 
and the bold project of damming the Red River, 
and thereby raising the water to a sufficient height 
to float the iron-clads over the rapids, was under- 
taken by Lieut.-Col. Bailey of the Fourth Wiscon- 
sin Cavalry. Gen. Banks provided a great number 
of negroes for this purpose; and assistance was 

(143) 



144 THE 9T0RY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

rendered by details from the several divisions of 
the army, which, in the meanwhile, was engaged in 
^throwing up an additional line of breastworks 
around Alexandria. 

The fatigue duty was very hard at this time ; 
for, in addition to the work of intrenching, the 
infantry had to unload the greater portion of the 
transports, not only of the rations for its own use, 
but also of the oats and corn for the cavalry, work- 
ing night as well as day, carrying heavy burdens 
up the steep banks of the levee, which were made 
slippery by the frequent rains. While the infantry 
was thus at work, the cavalry was no less ac- 
tively engaged in reconnoissances ; and scarcely 
a day passed in which woimded men were not 
brought into the town. 

On the 7th of May, the Thirty Eighth and the 
One Hundred and Twenty Eighth New York, ac- 
companied by a squadron of cavalry, marched thir- 
teen or fourteen miles from Alexandria, as guard 
to a wagon-train, which had been sent to procure 
forage. Scouts reported a body of the enemy en- 
gaged in obstructing the road, and there had been 
some skirmishing by the cavalry in the morning ; 
so that the order, " Over the levee ! " caused no 
surprise. Like a wave rolling up a smooth beach, 



THE CAPTURED MAILS. . 145 

the regiment swept over the embankment in an un- 
broken line, and then paused to see what the mat- 
ter was ; but no explanation could be given, and 
the march was resumed. This incident illustrated 
the complete discipline existing in the regiment, 
and the promptitude with which orders were 
obeyed. In the afternoon, the detachment re- 
turned to camp, having marched nearly thirty 
miles since morning. 

Lieut.-Col. Bailey had succeeded in his diflScult 
undertaking ; and, on the 9th, the gun-boats float- 
ed over the rapids, and arrived at Alexandria. 
Preparations were at once made to evacuate the 
town, and march to the Mississippi ; and the men 
worked night and day, loading the transports with 
quartermaster's, stores and ammunition. At two 
o'clock, on the morning of the 11th, the regiment 
broke camp; and, with the brigade, began the 
march ; but the progress of evacuation was slow, 
and it was not until the 14th that the whole army 
was fairly on the road. That day, the point was 
passed where the enemy had blockaded the river ; 
and near their rifle-pits were foimd the remnants 
of the captured mails, the ground being covered 
with the envelopes of the sixteen thousand letters 
that had fallen into their hands. The ptostage- 

13 



146 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

stamps, not yet defaced, had been carefully torn 
oflF, as if the captors had a lurkmg suspicion that 
the portrait of Washington was of more intrinsic 
value than that of either of the Confederate chiefs. 
Although the enemy had abandoned their posi- 
tion on the river, they still continued to harass 
the retreating army, keeping the cavalry constantly 
skirmishing ; and on the afternoon of the 15th, the 
firing became so rapid, that the army formed in 
line of battle several times, with the expectation 
of an engagement. At sundown, the musketry in- 
creased, accompanied by artillery, and the second 
division of the Nineteenth Corps went through the 
little town of Marksville on the double-quick, to 
the assistance of the eavalry, who were reported to 
have been severely handled. The enemy drew off, 
however, and the division bivouacked on an open 
plain beyond the village. Gen. Grover performed 
an act of kindness that night for the regiment, 
which was never forgotten. No water could be 
found nearer than the village, at least half a mile 
distant ; and while the men were debating whether 
to hunt for wells in the dark, or to lie down 
parched with thirst, the cavalry body-guard of 
Gen. Grover rode into the camp, with instructions 
from the general to take all the canteens of the 



MAN8URA PLAINS. 147 

Thirty Eighth, fill them, and bring them back; 
which they proceeded to do. 

The morning was ushered in by discharges of 
artillery at the front ; and the division moved for- 
ward in line of battle across the Plains of Man- 
sura. In the absence of Col. Sharpe, the com- 
mand of the third brigade devolved upon Col. 
Smith of the One Hundred and Twenty Eighth 
New York ; but that brave officer being disabled, 
Lieut.-Col. Richardson, at the approach of an en- 
gagement, left the ambulance in which he had 
been obliged to perform the greater part of the 
march, put himself at the head of the brigade, and 
manoeuvred it over the field of battle as coolly, 
and with as much skill,* as when on the parade- 
ground at Camp Kearney, leaving the Thirty 
Eighth under the command of Capt. Wyman, 
who was never known to flinch in battle. 

The advance of the Nineteenth Army Corps 
across the Plains of Mansura on the 16th of May, 
was the finest military spectacle seen in the De- 
partment of the Gulf during the war. The bat- 
teries at the front, enveloped in smoke; the in- 
fantry moving steadily up in lines of battle, 
division, brigade, and regimental flags easily dis- 
tinguished ; the cavalry on the flanks, impatiently 



148 THE 8T0BT OF THE THIBTT EIGHTH. 

waiting an opportunity to charge ; with the long 
lines of ambulances and wagons in the rear, — all 
of which could be taken in at a glance, — stamped 
itself on the memory of those present with a viv- 
idness never to be forgotten. 

As the lines moved forward, the enemy fell back, 
his fire gradually slackening, until it finally ceased, 
and he retreated by one of the roads branching 
off into the interior. The infantry had not come 
within musket-shot during this engagement; and 
although the shot and shell from the rebel batter- 
ies fell all over the field, — one huge mass of iron 
falling a few feet in front of Co. H, — there were no 
casualties in the regiment. But the whole corps 
suffered severely from tRe want of water, being 
obliged to quench their thirst in mud-holes from 
which the hogs had to be driven, and which was 
more than lukewarm. 

Continuing the march, in the afternoon a belt 
of woods was reached, with a clear bayou running 
through it, at the sight of which one glad cry broke 
from the ranks, and the brigade rushed eagerly to 
its banks. A halt was made beside this stream, 
until the men had fuUy quenched their thirst, and 
rested ; then emerging from the woods, the old 
Semmesport Road came in sight, over which the 



ENGAGEMENT IN THE BEAB. 149 

army had marched the year before ; and, as the 
regunent passed by the familiar sugar-houses and 
plantations, sad memories rushed to the mind, of 
comrades who bad then shared the toils and pleas- 
ures of the march, now done forever with life's 
battles. 

The army went into camp a mile beyond the 
resting-place of the previous year ; and the next 
morning, after a march of eight miles reached the 
Atchafalaya, where a large number of transports 
and gun-boats were collected. Although the enemy 
had withdrawn from the front, he still hung in the 
rear ; and on the 18th, an engagement took place, 
when the enemy were driven back by Gten. Mower, 
in command of the Sixteenth ajid Seventeenth 
Corps, assisted by the cavalry division. The Third 
and Sixth Massachusetts Cavalry made several 
brilliant charges in the action, did eflfective service, 
and lost a number of men. 

13* 




CHAPTEB XIV. 

Cross the Aicha&laya — The Fleet and Army part Compan j — Morganza — Saw- 
mill Expedition — Up the River — Embark for Algiers — Serenade the laen- 
tenant-colonel — Good-by to Louisiana. 

N" the 18th, the Nineteenth Corps crossed 
the Atchafalaya, near which it remained, 
merely changing camp several times, until 
the 20th ; and on the evening of that day, 
the entire naval and military force left 
Semmesport for the Mississippi. The Six- 
teenth and Seventeenth Corps were on the trans- 
ports, on their return to the department from 
which they had been borrowed; while the Thir- 
teenth and Nineteenth Corps, with the cavalry, were 
to continue the march through the country. 

At the junction of the Atchafalaya and the Red 
Rivers the main army and the navy separated. 
The sun was setting as the long procession of 
river-boats, gun-boats, and monitors swept around 
the bend of the river ; and a feeling of loneliness 
fell on the army as it turned inland, and took 
the course for the Mississippi. 

(150) 



SAW-MILL EXPEDITION. 151 

The previous year, the country was everywhere 
flooded, and the water-mark could now be seen on 
the houses and trees ; but the summer of 1864 was 
a dry one, and the roads in good condition to 
march. At midnight, the army went into camp ; 
and the day following reached the banks of the 
Mississippi, at Morganza Bend, after one of the 
most fatiguing marches the regiment had ever ex- 
perienced. After a great deal of manoeuvring on 
the evening of the 21st and the forenoon of the 
following day, the division finally encamped on the 
sandy plain between the new levee and the river, 
where it quietly remained, recovering from the 
fatigue of the march, until the morning of the 
30th, when the third brigade of the second divis- 
ion, and a portion of the Thirteenth corps, with 
cavalry and artillery, left the camp and took the 
road to the Atchafalaya. 

The column marched until 10, a. m., halted dur- 
ing the heat of the day, and started again at 8 p. m. 
As night came on, the road became poor, and 
marching difficult; but no danger was evidently 
anticipated by the commanding officer, for the 
usual precaution, when in an enemy's country, of 
throwing out flankers, was dispensed with. Sud- 
denly, from a thickly wooded hill on the left, across 



152 THE 8T0BT OP THE THIBTT EIGHTH. 

a bayou, a volley of musketry broke upon the still- 
ness of the night, taking effect in the Twenty Sec- 
ond Iowa, in advance of the Thirty Eighth. " Am- 
bushed ! " was the thought of all, as the ranks 
closed up, and formed in line of battle in good 
order. A battery sent a shell into the woods from 
whence the discharge had come ; but there was no 
response ; and, after remaining in line for a short 
time, the column moved forward, but had scarcely 
started when another volley came from the woods, 
this time directed against the regiments in the rear. 
The echoes had not died away, when a sheet of 
flame flashed along the line of the One Hundred 
and Fifty Sixth and One Hundred and Seventy 
Fifth, followed by a crashing report. 

Nothing more was heard from the enemy ; and 
as soon as a bridge was reached, the Thirty Eighth 
was sent across the bayou, to act as ^' flankers." 
The darkness could almost be felt ; and as the men 
groped their way through the woods, falling into 
holes, tumbling over stumps, and occasionally 
running into a thorn-tree, with a lurking suspicion 
all the time, which was afterward confirmed, that 
the main army did not know of their presence 
across the stream, and that the accidental discharge 
of a rifle would be the signal for a murderous vol- 



SAW-MILL EXPEDITION. 158 

ley from their friends, it will not be wondered at 
that respect for those iii command was, for the time 
being, lost, and that officers and men alike were 
disgusted at the incompetency shown. It is need- 
less to say that Gen. Emory was not with the expe- 
dition. 

After a mile or two of this stumbling work, the 
column halted, it being then midnight, and " bivou- 
acked in rear of the stacks." One officer in the 
Twenty Second Iowa had been killed, and several 
men in the One Hundred and Fifty Sixth and 
One Hundred and Seventy Fifth New York, 
wounded, by the fire of the guerillas ; and it was 
reported that a number of the enemy had been 
killed by the heavy volley of the two latter regi- 
ments. Several parties living near the spot were 
arrested, but their fate was never made known. 

In the morning, the command retraced its steps, 
and marched back, to the resting-place of the day 
previous, where it remained during the night, get- 
ting the benefit of a summer rain. The next day, 
June 1, the expedition again marched toward the 
Atchafalaya, and remained in reserve a short dis- 
tance from that river while the Seventh Massachu- 
setts Battery shelled a saw-mill on the opposite side, 
destroying its machinery, and rendering it useless. 



154 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Another night was spent in the vicinity, and on the 
morning of the 2d the command marched back to 
camp, glad that the " saw-mill expedition " was 
over. 

Nothing further transpired until the 6th of the 
month, when the paymaster arrived, and the divis- 
ion received four months' pay, to its own satisfac- 
tion and to the great profit of the sutlers, who 
gathered as turkey-buzzards to a feast. With the 
exception of several reviews, for the gratification 
of travelling generals, the regiment remained in 
camp, sending out a picket every day, and drilling 
in the morning, until June 19, when it embarked 
on the steamer Starlight, and proceeded up the 
river as far as Fort Adams, in the State of Mis- 
sissippi, the guerillas having made their appearance 
in that vicinity. This excursion was a pleasant 
one, the regiment bivouacking under the trees on 
the bank of the river during the day, and retiring 
on board the transport when the mosquitoes be- 
came troublesome at night. No enemy being dis- 
covered, the troops returned to Morganza on the 
21st, and occupied their old camps. 

From this time until the 1st of July, about all 
the volunteer labor performed by the men con- 
sisted in writing the two words " very hot " in their 



LAND AT ALGIERS. 155 

diaries, although there was some involuntary work, 
such as corps reviews, inspections, etc., with the 
thermometer up to 100° in the shade, and the 
sand blistering to the feet ; while the picket had a 
nightly contest with the mosquitoes, — Louisiana 
mosquitoes, be it remembered. On the 1st of July, 
the Sixth Massachusetts Cavalry (formerly the 
Thirty First Infantry) passed by Morganza in a 
transport, on their way home on furlough, having 
re-enlisted ; and the Thirty Eighth formed in line 
on the river-bank, and gave them a farewell cheer. 
The camp as usual was full of rumors with 
regard to future movements ; and one day the 
brigade would be going to Texas ; then to New 
Orleans to do provost duty ; then they were to be 
transformed into marines, and patrol the river on 
steamboats ; again, Col. Ingraham had procured a 
" soft thing for the regiment in Washington." On 
the 3d of June, however, the brigade, now in- 
creased by the addition of the One Hundred and 
Seventy Sixth New York, embarked on board of 
the City of Memphis, and the next day (July 
4), landed at Algiers, and went into camp, where 
it remained until the 20th. On the march to Mor- 
ganza, for some frivolous pretext, the brigade com- 
mander, who was disliked by the entire brigade, 



156 THE STORY OF THE THIBTY EIGHTH. 

had put the lieutenant-colonel of the Thirty Eighm 
under arrest. The charges were investigated by a 
court-martial, and Lieut.-Col. Richardson was hon- 
orably acquitted and restored to his command. 
The entire absence, in this officer, of that pomp 
assumed by many of the Eastern officers, and which 
was seldom found in the Western regiments, to- 
gether with his desire to make the duties of the 
rank and file as agreeable as was compatible with 
good discipline, and his superior military acquire- 
ments, had won the attachment of the regiment ; 
and, upon his being restored to the conmiand, the 
men procured a band, and serenaded him in his 
quarters, to which he replied in a neat speech. 

The regiment remained at Algiers, trying to 
keep cool during the day, and fighting mosqui- 
toes at night, until the 20th of July, when it 
took passage on the Karnack, with two compa- 
nies of the Thirteenth Connecticut, and squads 
belonging to other regiments, and, bidding good-by 
to the Mississippi, was once more on the blue 
water. Fortunate was it for the Thirty Eighth 
that no storms disturbed the Atlantic during this 
passage, or their history would have had a sudden 
termination ; for the vessel on which they em- 
barked was old, and had been on the Florida reefs 



ON THE TRANSPORT. 157 

the previous voyage ; the crew scarcely knew one 
rope from another, and their oflScers knew very 
little more ; the troops were packed so close, above 
deck and below, that there was barely room to turn 
over ; the cooks, even by working all night, could 
not supply the men with half rations ; and there 
was no protection whatever from the sun or the 
rain. 



14 




CHAPTEB XY. 



Arriyal at Fortress Monroe — Washiof^n — Georgetown Heights — Monocaoy 
Junction — Up and down the Valley of the Shenandoah — Battle of 
Opeqoan Creek. 



]N the eighth day after crossing the bar oflf 
the Mississippi, the ship reached Fortress 
Monroe, where Lieut.-Colonel Richardson 
received orders to proceed to Washington 
immediately. Entering the Potomac, the 
men realized that they were no longer on 
Louisiana waters ; the hills stretching up from the 
river, the hay and grain fields just reaped, and the 
scattering farm-houses, being in striking contrast 
to the low banks of the Mississippi, with its plan- 
tations, its negro cabins, its orange trees, and its 
alligators. 

The steamer came to anchor oflF Alexandria; 
and was subsequently towed up to a wharf in 
Washington, the regiment remaining on board till 
morning, when it landed and marched through 
the city to Georgetown Heights. While resting on 
the sidewalk in Pennsylvania Avenue, the regi- 
ment received a visit from Col. Ingraham, who 

(158) 



GEORGETOWN HEIGHTS. 159 

appeared glad to see the boys, and who must have 
been struck with the great change in the appear- 
ance of his old command since he had last seen it. 

All summer, the troops in Louisiana had been 
obliged to drink warm, dirty water, from rivers, 
bayous, and mud-holes; and when, upon arriving 
at Georgetown Heights, two cool, delicious springs 
were found bubbling out of the rocks, the satisfac- 
tion was unbounded, and many men lingered 
around them as if attracted by some fairy spell. 

The stay in Georgetown was a short one. On 
Sunday afternoon, July 31, the regiment broke 
camp, and again marched through Washington, 
to the Baltimore depot. The closed stores, the 
crowd of church-going folks on the sidewalks, and 
the absence of vehicle^ in the streets, told the men 
of the Thirty Eighth that they were once more in 
a land where the Sabbath was outwardly observed, 
at least. A brief extract from a letter written a 
day or two after the march through Washington 
will give an idea of the interest which the arrival 
of troops at that time excited. 

" . . . . There was an interest and a curiosity 
manifested by the citizens never exhibited in New 
Orleans. In that city, regiments might march 
through the streets from morning till night, and 



160 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

no one would think of asking who they were, or 
where they came from. In Washington, on the 
contrary, the questions put to us were quite nu- 
merous. The deep color burnt into our faces by 
the Louisiana sun told plainly that we were no 
militia men, even if our marching and general 
appearance did not show it ; and so the first ques- 
tion was, ' What corps do you belong to ? * ' The 
Nineteenth.' *0h, Banks's men.' And the in- 
quirers generally appeared to be pleased at the 
information. A general surprise was shown at the 
smallness of the regiment ; and one man asked me, 
' What company is that ? ' * Company ! ' said I, 

* That's the Thirty Eighth Massachusetts regiment.^ 

* Where's the rest of them ? ' * A good many were 
buried in Louisiana.' * Oh, you belong to the 
Nineteenth Corps.' I expected, before we got 
through Washington, to be asked what squad we 
were." 

It must be remembered that the enemy then 
threatened Washington by way of Harper's Ferry, 
and the arrival of the Nineteenth Corps was a great 
relief to their fears, although the regiments ap- 
peared small, accustomed as they were to the 
arrival of new regiments with fiill ranks. 

After a supper at the " Soldier's Rest," the regi- 



UP AND DOWN THE SHENANDOAH. 161 

ment took the cars about eight o'clock, and reached 
Monocacy Junction a little before noon the next 
day, going into camp in a reaped grain-field, near 
the still smoking tuins of the depot, and in the 
vicinity of the battle-field of Monocacy, where the 
first division of the corps was then in camp. 

No movement took place until the 4th of August, 
when the cars were again taken, and, in company 
with the Third Massachusetts Cavalry, which had 
been dismounted, the regiment rode to Harper's 
Ferry, bivouacking for the night on the heights 
overlooking the town. 

August 6th, the army broke camp, and marched 
to Halltown, four miles beyond Harper's Ferry, 
where the Thirty Eighth was attached to the first 
brigade of the second division, then in command 
of Col. Macauley, of the Eleventh Indiana. On 
the 10th, the whole force, artillery, cavalry, and 
infantry, under Gen. Sheridan, moved forward in 
pursuit of the enemy, the cavalry skirmishing with 
their rear-guard; and, on the night of the 12th, 
the regiment went into camp a few miles beyond 
Middletown, near Cedar Creek. 

The men of the Nineteenth Corps, who had been 
worn ,out by the Red River campaign, who had 
regained but a small portion of their strength 



162 THE STOET OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

while encamped on the banks of the Mississippi 
under the burning sun, and who had been packed 
almost as close as slaves on the transports, began 
this new campaign under unfavorable circum- 
stances. Unlike the level plains of Louisiana, the 
marching in this portion of Virginia was over hills 
and through valleys, and the summer heat was 
still intense ; but the clear, cold springs all through 
the valley were a luxury the Thirty Eighth was 
unaccustomed to, and men lingered around them, 
drinking again and again. 

The army remained at Cedar Creek until near 
midnight of the 16th, when, in danger of being 
flanked by the enemy, the whole command fell 
back toward Winchester, the Thirty Eighth going 
into camp at Milltown, where they remained 
during the day. The reveille was beaten at one 
o'clock, A. M. of the 17th, and passing through 
Winchester, the regiment reached Berryville at 
noon, and went into camp. 

Thursday, the 18th, opened with a rain-storm ; 
but the weather seldom interfered with Gen. Sheri- 
dan's operations, and the army still fell back, en- 
camping at night in the vicinity of Charlestown, 
where the Thirty Eighth remained until the 20th, 
when, in pursuance of orders, it changed camp, and 



UP AND DOWN THE SHENANDOAH. 163 

rejoined the third brigade, which had just arrived 
in the Valley under the command of Col. Sharpe. 

Sunday, Aug. 21, orders came to pack up ; and 
the regiment formed in line of battle, stacked arms, 
and threw up breastworks, heavy skirmishing going 
on at the front ; but, during the evening, again f^U 
back, passed through Charlestown, and reached 
HaUtown at one, p. m., of the 23d, going into camp 
for the night. During a heavy rain, the next day 
the regiment built more breastworks, and then 
moved to the left ; but returned on the day follow- 
ing, and remained in camp until Sunday, the 28th, 
when the army again assumed the offensive, and 
advanced to Summit Point, a few miles beyond 
Charlestown. While these movements were being 
executed, skirmishing between the advance of one 
army and the rear of the other was continually 
going on, and the cavalry were almost constantly 
in the saddle. 

On the 3d of September, the army again broke 
camp^ and marched to Berryville, where a sharp 
encounter took place between a portion of the 
Eighth Corps and Early's force; but the enemy 
retiring, the engagement did not become general. 
The third brigade, however, formed in line of bat- 
tle, took up a position on a ledge of rocks, and 



164 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY ETGHTH. 

remained there all night, sending out two com- 
panies as skirmishers. Every one was wet through, 
and the wind swept coldly over the ledge. . 

Sunday, Sept. 4, the regiment was detached 
from the brigade, and marched further to the 
frfint, where new breastworks were thrown up, the 
rain still continuing ; the enemy, all the while, 
shelling the line, and skirmishing constantly going 
on. During the next fortnight, but little worthy 
of mention tra;ispired, except that the army here 
completed a third line of breastworks. 

On the 14th, a detail was sent from each com- 
pany to procure the blankets belonging to the men 
in the regiment, which had been packed at£aton 
Rouge previous to the Red River campaign, and 
which were then supposed to be at Harper's Perry ; 
but upon the arrival of the detail at that place, it 
was found that the boxes had been sent to Wash- 
ington, and the blankets were not received until 
late in October. When the weather permitted, 
company, battalion, and brigade drills took place 
while the regiment was encamped in this place. 

Although Gen. Sheridan kept his own counsels, 
he was not deceived in regard to the movements 
of Early. At three o'clock, on the morning of the 
19th of September, the reveille was beaten in the 



UP AND DOWN THE SHENANDOAH. 165 

camps, and the army marched through Berryville, 
the Nineteenth Corps halting beyond, and being- 
informed that they would probably fight on that 
spot. At this time, heavy cannonading was heard 
on the right, and at the front, where the cavalry 
was engaged. After halting an hour or two, the 
Nineteenth Corps advanced by the flank, passing a 
hospital into which great numbers of wounded men 
were being brought, who had fallen when the cav- 
alry drove the enemy from the woods on each side 
of the Winchester Pike. Passing through a de- 
file, the brigade came upon a high table-land, and 
formed in line of battle on the edge of a belt of 
woods between the opposing forces, the third bri- 
gade being at this time on the extreme left of the 
Nineteenth Corps, and coimecting with the Sixth 
Corps. Each regiment sent out skirmishers, who 
advanced into the woods, followed by the brigade 
in line of battle; and emerging on to an open 
plain, which was crossed at a rapid pace, the 
enemy were encountered in the woods beyond, and 
the battle became hot. 

The brigade had ad'anced too fast, leaving its 
right flank exposed ; and, unable to withstand the 
heavy fire concentrated upon it, the Thirty Eighth 
fell back, having lost many officers and men. At 



166 THE STORT OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

one time, the battle-flag was within a few yards of 
the banner of a rebel regiment, and its capture 
seemed imminent; but color-sergeant Lunt, sup- 
ported by color-corporal Abbot, bravely carried it 
through. Col. Sharpe and Lieut.-Col. Richardson 
had been wounded ; and the command of the bri- 
gade devolved upon Lieut.-Col. Neafie, of the One 
Hundred and Fifty Sixth New York, Maj. All6n 
taking command of the Thirty Eighth. 

The regiment, as usual, had gone into battle 
with few ofl&cers. Lieuts. Whitney and Davis, and 
Sergt. Palmer, in command of companies, had been 
shot down, with many warrant officers, and many 
men ; and in the retreat, owing to this fact, and to 
the nature of the ground, the regiment became 
separated from the brigade, which had been par- 
tially broken up by the impetuosity of the first 
charge. The men, however, rallied around the 
colors ; and, under the lead of Major Allen and 
Adjutant Wellington, again sought the front of the 
fight. 

After a desperate struggle, the enemy broke ; 
and, having' formed his army in three crescent- 
shaped lines of battle, Gen Sheridan gave the order, 
" Forward ! '' Before that victorious charge, the 
veterans of Stonewall Jackson fled in confusion. 



THE VICTORY OF THE OPEQUAN. 167 

the whole rebel force went "whirling through 
Winchester," and the Union army remained in 
possession of the hard-fought field. 

The cavalry followed the retreating enemy, and 
gathered up the spoils of the victory ; but the 
infantry went into camp on the outskirts of Win- 
chester, and rested from the labor and excitement 
of the day, while the great news was silently speed- 
ing its way North to electrify and gladden the loyal 
hearts of the country. The Valley of the Shenan- 
doah was no longer to recall memories of defeat 
and humiliation alone. 

The loss in the regiment had been eight killed, 
thirty-eight wounded, eight prisoners, and one 
missing. A number afterward died from the 
effects of the wounds received; but those cap- 
tured were remarkably fortunate, the majority of 
them being paroled in a few days, and sent to 
Annapolis. 



CHAPTEE XVI. 




The Pursuit — Congratulatory Order — Fisher's Hill — Gen. Emory — Mount 
Jackmn — Mount Crawford — Cedar Creek — Build Breastworks — Sur- 
prise — Battle of Cedar Creek — Fall back to Keamstown — Martinsburg — 
Thanksgiving. 

'■■"■ I HE battle was won, and now came the pur- 
suit; Col. McCauley assumed the com- 
mand of the third brigade, which broke 
camp at daylight of the 20th, and began the 
march up the Valley, reaching Strasburg 
in the evening. The next day, congratu- 
latory orders from the President and Gen. Grant 
were read to the troops ; and in the afternoon, the 
regiment changed :.amp, and took a new position 
on the hills overlooking Strasburg, The enemy 
were strongly entrenched on Fisher's hill, in a po- 
sition considered almost impregnable; but they 
were not allowed to remain in undisturbed pos- 
session long. At daylight, on the 22d, the Nine- 
teenth Corps moved up in front, and constructed 
breastworks, driving in the rebel skirmishers from 
their rifle-pitS. The Eighth Corps, passing up the 

north side of the mountain, took the enemy com- 
aes) 



fisher's hill. 169 

pletely by surprise, while the Nineteenth Corps 
charging in front, in three lines of battle, cheered 
on by Sheridan, drove them in confusion from 
their strongholds. It was near night, when the 
rebels fled ; and the pursuit was kept up till morn- 
ing, when Woodstock was reached. 

In the heat of the pursuit, the advance forces 
were fired into by an ambush, and one man in- 
stantly killed. Some confusion ensuing. Gen. 
Emory rode up, and inquired what regiment it 
was. " Thirty Eighth," was the reply. " Just the 
regiment I want," said the old veteran; and he 
immediately formed the regiment in line of bat- 
tle across the pike. 

Soon after, it was sent forward to skirmish, and 
marched in that manner during the night, reach- 
ing Woodstock in the morning, and remained there 
till noon. Continuing the march, the brigade went 
into camp at night beyond the beautiful little town 
of Edenburg. The next day's march (in column 
by brigade) was a fatiguing one, the Nineteenth 
Corps being obliged to make a flank movement at 
Mount Jackson, to drive the rebels from a thickly 
wooded hill beyond the Shenandoah River ; and 
upon going into camp beyond Newmarket, the rear- 
guard of the retreating enemy was in sight. 
15 



170 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

On Sunday, 25th, the brigade reached Harrison- 
burg, which was then full of wounded rebels, and 
remained quietly in camp until the 29th, when the 
Nineteenth Corps and one division of the Sixth 
Corps marched to Mount Crawford to support a 
cavalry movement, the Thirty Eighth acting as 
flankers, and being detailed at night as picket. 
The next day, the entire force moved back to Har- 
risonburg, having destroyed a great number of 
barns and mills. 

During this march up the Valley, rations were 
often short, the supply-trains not being able to 
keep up ; and the army was obliged to live partly 
on the country. The fine apples were especially 
prized after the long abstinence from vegetables 
and fruit; and the premium sheep afforded rich 
repasts to the hungry boys, who seldom stopped to 
inquire whether they were of the long or short 
wool species. Indeed, some of the city boys of the 
Thirty Eighth were not adepts in agricultural mat- 
ters, or one of them would not have approached a 
" lord of the herd " with a coaxing " So, mooly ; 
so, mooly," his dipper carefully concealed behind 
him. 

Eemaining at Harrisonburg until Oct. 6th, on 
that day the regiment marched to Newmarket, 



BATTLE OF CEDAR CBEEK. 171 

making eighteen miles, and, on the day following, 
had a still harder march of twenty-two miles. Still 
falling back, on the 8th Flint Hill was reached, 
where there was much suflFering from the cold. On 
the 10th, after hearing orders from Gen. Sheridan, 
announcing a large capture of artillery, wagons, 
ambulances, and prisoners from Early, the army 
moved back to Cedar Creek, and again constructed 
breastworks. An engagement took place on the 
14th, between a brigade of the Eighth Corps and 
a portion of Early's troops, in which the Thirty 
Fourth Massachusetts lost heavily. Col. Wells, in 
command of the brigade, being killed. 

On the evening of the 18th, the third brigade 
received orders to be in readiness in the morning 
for a reconnoissance, and were in line before day- 
light for that purpose, when a sudden crash of 
musketry on the left, where the Eighth Corps were 
encamped, gave intimation of an attack. The 
brigade was ordered to the breastworks immedi- 
ately, and men sent forward to the creek, at the 
base of the hill, to give notice of the approach of 
the enemy. No attack was made in front ; but, 
on the left, having flanked the Eighth Corps, and 
driven it back in confusion, the rebels fell upon 
the Nineteenth, of which the third brigade of the 



172 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

second division was the extreme left, the Thirty 
Eighth being on the right of the brigade. Exposed 
to a severe cross-fire, the brigade-commander, Col 
McCauley, being wounded, and the victorious rebels 
sweeping all before them, the regiment fell back, 
passed through the camp, and joined 'in the re- 
treat. At this time the battle seemed lost, and all 
the manoeuvring in the Valley for the past two 
months thrown away ; but the enemy failed to fol- 
low up his advantage promptly ; and the Union 
army, recovering from the confusion into which it 
had been thrown by the suddenness of the attack, 
reformed its scattered ranks, and disputed the fur- 
ther advance of> the rebels, when the arrival of 
Gen. Sheridan on the ground at noon^ put a new 
face upon matters. The army was no longer 
without a leader. A temporary breastwork of 
rails was thrown up, behind which the rebel ad- 
vance was awaited ; and, as they drew near, a ter- 
rific volley of musketry staggered and repulsed 
them. The tide was turning. Riding over the 
field, showing himself to every regiment, and every- 
where received with enthusiasm, the presence of a 
master-spirit was at once felt ; and when the proper 
time came, and the order was given to charge, 
the army advanced with a power that crushed all 



Sheridan's ride. 173 

resistance. The cavalry dashed into the broken 
ranks of the fleeing enemy, capturing them by 
hundreds, while the infantry pressed on eagerly 
toward the camps they had left in the mprning 
In this final charge, for almost the first time in its 
history, the regiment was in the second line of 
battle. 

Back over the battle-ground where they had tri- 
umphed all day, over the Union breastworks, and 
beyond Cedar Creek, in one confused mass, the 
discomfited rebels fled, abandoning gims, wagons, 
rations, and even the plunder of the Union camps ; 
while the victors took possession of their recovered 
quarters. 

" Up from the south at break of day, 
Bringing to Winchester fresh dismay, 
The affirighted air with a shudder bore, 
Like a herald in haste, to the chieftain's door, 
The terrible grumble and rumble and roar. 
Telling the battle was on once more. 
And Sheridan twenty miles away. 

** And wilder still those billows of war 
Thundered along the horizon's bar, 
And louder yet into Winchester rolled 
The roar of that red sea uncontrolled, 
Making the blood of the listener cold, 
As he thought of the stake in that fiery fray 
And Sheridan twenty miles away. 

" But there is a road fix)m Winchester town — 
A good, broad highway leading down ; 
16* 



174 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

And there, through the flush of the morning light, 

A steed, black as the steeds of night, 

Was seen to pass as with eagle flight. 

As if he knew the terrible need, 

He stretched awaj with his utmost speed: 

Hill rose and fell ; but hb heart was gaj, 

With Sheridan fifteen miles away. 

'* Still sprung from those swift hoofs, thundering south. 
The dust, like the smoke from the cannon's mouth, 
Or the trail of a comet, sweeping faster and fiister, 
Foreboding to traitors the doom of disaster. 
The heart of the steed and the heart of the master 
Were beating like prisoners assaulting their walls, 
Impatient to be where the battle-field calls: 
Every nerve of the charger was strained to full play. 
With Sheridan only t€n miles away. 

" Under his spuming feet, the road, 
Like a narrow Alpine river, flowed; 
And the landscape sped away behind, 
Like an ocean flying before the wind; 
And the steed, like a bark fed with furnace ire. 
Swept on, with his wild eyes full of fire ; 
But lo ! he is nearing his heart's desire, — 
He is snuffing the smoke of the roaring fray. 
With Sheridan only five miles away. 

** The first that the General saw were the groups 
Of stragglers, and then the retreating troops. 
What was done — what to do — a glance told him both ; 
Then striking his spurs with a terrible oath. 
He dashed down the line 'mid a storm of huzzas. 
And the wave of retreat checked its course there because 
The sight of the master compelled it to pause. 
With foam and with dust the black charger was gray; 
By the flash of his eye, and his red nostril's play. 
He seemed to the whole great army to say: 
* I have brought you Sheridan all the way 
From Winchester down to save the day ! * 

* Hurrah, hurrah for Sheridan ! 
Hurrah, hurrah, for horse and man ! 



CONGRATULATORY ORDERS. 175 

And when their statnes are placed on high, 
Under the dome of the Union sky, — 
The American soldier's Temple of Fame, — 
There, with the glorious Greneral's name, 
Be it said, in letters both bold and bright: 
*Here is the steed that saved' the day. 
By carrying Sheridan into the fight, 
From Winchester, — twenty miles away ! ' " 

The men had lost everything not on their per- 
sons, — clothing, blankets, likenesses of friends, 
letters, journals of the two years' service, and me- 
mentos of the Louisiana campaigns; and, worse 
than all, over thirty of their comrades were on their 
way to torture and starvation in Salisbury or the 
Libby. Leaving the cavalry to pursue the flying 
enemy,. the infantry, cold and hungry, bivouacked 
for the night on their old camp-grounds. In the 
morning, the army moved two miles toward Stras- 
burg, and remained there until the 21st, when the 
second division returned to Cedar Creek. 

Congratulatory orders Irom the President to 
Gen. Sheridan were read to the troops on the 
24th ; and, on the 26th, the ever-welcome face of 
the paymaster appeared in camp. The Cambridge 
companies were gratified, on the 30th, by a visit 
from Mr. Wellington, who, as usual, brought many 
articles for the comfort of the men. With the 
exception of a corps review by Gens. Sheridan, 



176 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Wright, Cook, and Emory, on the 7th of Novem- 
ber, nothing of importance transpired until the 
9th, when the army fell back to Kearnstown, and 
went into quarters between that village and Win- 
chester (Camp Russell), where heavy breastworks 
were thrown up. The enemy had not yet left the 
Valley. On the evening of the 10th, the wagons 
were packed m anticipation of an attack; and 
there was lively skirmishing at the front during 
the next day; but, the enemy did not appear in 
force, and Powell's cavalry by a bold dash, made 
a large capture of prisoners and munitions of war. 

Monday afternoon, Nov. 14, the regiment broke 
camp, and marched to Winchester ; and, on the 
following morning started for Martinsburg, as 
guard to a supply-train, making the entire dis- 
tance, twenty-two miles, before night. Leaving 
Martinsburg on the 19th, the regiment returned to 
camp near Winchester, and resumed camp duties. 

The picket duty at Camp Russell was very se- 
vere, especially as the weather grew cold. No 
fires were allowed at night ; a vidette was thrown 
out from every post ; and, at daybreak, the picket- 
line deployed, and remained so until sunrise. At 
the same time, every regiment stood in line-of-battle 
behind the breastworks. . 



THANKSGIVING. 177 

Thanksgiving Day, the regiment received a por- 
tion of the poultry sent from the North for the 
soldiers ; and, by clubbing together, nearly all the 
messes had a tolerable soup. A real Thanksgiving, 
however, arrived from Cambridge on the 27th; 
and then Cos. A, B, and F had turkeys and chick- 
ens and puddings in abundance. If the kind 
friends at home could have looked into those little 
tents at Camp Russell, at that time, they would 
have considered themselves repaid for all their 
trouble. 




CHAPTER XVII. 

Preparations for Winter — Log-huts — Break Gamp — Winchester — Prorost 
Duty — Baltimore— The Stables — Visit of Rev Dr. Ware — Bxtracta 

from Letters. 

jr 

REPARATIONS now began to be made 
for passing the winter at Camp Russell. 
The shelter-tents afforded poor protection 
against the snow-storms, which were be- 
coming frequent, and boards were scarce ; 
so, in every camp, log-villages arose, many 
of them far neater in appearance than the tene- 
ments in which families of poor whites had been 
reared on the banks of the Red River. 

The regiment was putting up its last row of 
huts, when a sudden stop was put to all further 
work, by the reception, on the afternoon of the 
20th, of marching orders; and before daylight 
the next morning, in the midst of h driving storm, 
the third brigade broke camp, and marched to 
Winchester, where the Thirty Eighth was selected 
to do provost duty, and quartered in deserted 
buildings in the vicinity of the Court House. A 

(178) 



WINC^ESTER. 179 

portion of the duty here consisted in guarding 
the rebel prisoners brought in by the cavalry, 
and in taking squads of them to Harper's Perry. 

The people in Winchester, and all through the 
Valley, were bitter foes to the Union, giving con- 
stant information to the enemy of all military 
movements ; and many of the pro^nent citizens 
had been sent to Port Henry, in Baltimore. The 
women adhered to the Confederate cause with a 
tenacity that could not but win respect, and daily 
brought baskets of food to the captured rebels. 
One day, it was the duty of the writer to notify 
the citizens to have the snow taken ofif their side- 
walks within a certain specified time, — hot a very 
pleasant task considering that the majority of the 
houses were tenanted by females. Some quietly 
said it should be done ; others were not so tracta- 
ble. One fair dame said, in a rich Virginia ac- 
cent, that we had taken all the men oflF, and that 
she would see us " durn'd " before she'd shovel 
snow : she'd " go to the gurd-house first." Por- 
tunately, a " right smart rain " that night did the 
work, and saved the dignity of the fair ones. 

Tlie provost duty at Winchester was of short 
duration. Marching orders were received on the 
5th of January ; and before daylight the next 



180 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

morning, the regiment was groping its way 
through the silent streets to the outskirts of the 
town,* where it awaited the arrival of the brigade, 
under command of Lieut.-Col. Richardson, who 
had recovered from his wound, and returned to 
duty a few days previously. 

The railroad terminated at Stephenson's station, 
five miles from Winchester, and upon reaching 
that place, the brigade was obliged to wait several 
hours in a cold rain-storm while the train was 
made up, when, packed close in cattle-cars and on 
them, the division again brought together, rode to 
Baltimore, reaching that city on the morning of 
the 7th. The journey had been an uncomfortable 
one, those on the outside being exposed all night 
to the storm, while the men were packed so close 
inside that holes had to be cut in the cars to let in 
fresh air. 

Upon arriving at Baltimore, the division quar- 
tered in the cavalry stables at Camp Carroll, near 
the old camp, Emory, from which the regiment 
had departed over two years before. The weather 
was cold, the boards were partly oflF the buildings, 
and the only way to keep comfortable was by 
building large fires in the centre of the stable, the 
smoke from which found its way in time through 



VISIT OP DR. WARE. 181 

the crevices in the roof. The Twenty Second 
Iowa occupied one side of the stable ; and when 
the two regiments were frying pork over dozens of 
fires up and down the length of the building, it 
required strong lungs to stand the smoke and 
smell. Nevertheless, one Boston lady, Mrs. James 
H. Norris, an agent of the Christian Commission, 
learning that a Massachusetts regiment was in 
Baltimore, found it out, braved the unpleasant 
surroundings, and delivered mittens, socks, needle- 
books, etc., not only to those who needed them in 
the Thirty Eighth, but also to the Iowa boys. 
The regiment also had the pleasure of a visit 
fipom an old friend, the Rev. Dr. Ware, formerly 
of Cambridge, then pastor of a church in Balti- 
more, who had once made a visit to Camp Emory, 
and who now came loaded with packages of to- 
bacco, stationery, and other articles acceptable to 
soldiers who had been months without pay. The 
doctor distributed his treasures not only to the 
Thirty Eighth, but to the Iowa boys on the oppo- 
site side of the stable. Dr. Ware repeated his 
visit, and gave an account of the impressions he 
received in two letters to the " Cambridge Chron- 
icle," which were perused with much pleasure by 
the men of the Thirty Eighth. 

16 



182 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

The following extracts from these interesting 
letters will give the reader a view of the regiment 
from the " outside " : — 

" .... It was a clear, cold Sunday, — a day like the finest 
of our New England winter days, and a walk of some three 
miles brought me to the camp. What memories it awoke I 
Not three years ago, close by, lay encamped the Thirty Eighth, 
on the crest of a hill, surrounded by other re^ments of the 
same brigade. Everything about war was new 'then, and I 
well remember how clean and neat the whole camp was, and 
with what pains every man rubbed his buttons, and blacked 
his boots, and brushed his coat, and kept his gun. 

"I remember, too, the admirable drills, the perfect dress- 
parade, in such marked contrast with all the regiments about 
I remember a brigade review, in which I stood a delighted 
listener to the praises heaped upon the Thirty Eighth, by New 
York officers not on duty. The last time I saw Col. Rod- 
man — the friend of many years, who fell before Port Hud- 
son — was there at evening parade. I see his fine form before 
me now. I recall his pride in the appearance of his men, — 
how we lingered and chatted after the parade was over, — how 
we parted at the camp lines, — neither he, nor many others 
then there in life and hope, to come back to their homes 
again. 

" All this and more was in my mind as I walked up and 

down the capip of thousand men, asking for the Mass. 

Thirty Eighth in vain. Chancing to remember that regimental 
numbers are not apt to be known beyond the re^ment, I 
asked for the Third brigade, and at last was told that in a cer- 



EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS. 185 

tain long bam I should find the Thirty Eighth, on the right 
hand side, — the left being occupied by some other regiment 
I remembered the stable as belonging to the cavalry of Emory's 
brigade two years and a half ago. It was made of rough 
boards, which probably never had matched, and the wind and 
wet, the cold and heat of the months since had not drawn 
them any more closely together. As I entered, the sight was 
one of which those at home can form no conception. All 
down the long centre of the building, at company intervals, 
were circular piles of logs, around which men were grouped 
as thick as they could sit, some chatting, some singing, some 
eating, some silent On either side were others taking their 
supper, sitting or Ijring on the ground, or writing letters ; while 
in grand promiscuousness, blankets, cups, plates, knapsacks lay 
about everywhere. You could scarcely keep your eyes open 
for the smoke, which these old campaigners did not seem to 
notice. And here was what was left of the Thirty Eighth, — 
not spruce and nice as when I last saw them, but thinned by 
battle and disease, four hundred and seventy out of a thou- 
sand, — and now, just from a journey of fearful exposure and 
cold, bearing signs of the life they had led since we parted. 

" .... I recognized some; more recognized me, and I 
hope they enjoyed the meeting as much as I did. How I 
wished the home folk could be there 1 It would have made 
their hearts ache a little to see how without the shadow of a 
comfort these men were, while they would have glowed with 
pride at the genuine, uncomplaining manhood before them. 
They had supposed themselves fixed for the winter. Orders 
had been sent commanders to see the men properly housed. 
Things were settling down into the inactivity of the cold 



184 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

season. The Thirty Eighth was doing provost duty in Win- 
chester, when Thursday evening orders came to march at six 
the next morning. 

" It was a day of cold and rain and wind. That day, that 
night, into the next forenoon, in baggage, on platform, in un- 
cleaned cattle-cars — on them as well — this division jour- 
neyed. We have had no such cold hereabout this winter — 
some were frost-bitten, but none seriously. Saturday noon 
found them at * Camp Carroll,* — the old summer residence of 
Charles Carroll — weary, cold, and hungry, with bare shelter 
from the winds, and such straw for bed as any individual for- 
aging would supply. And yet they spoke of the comfortable 
quarters ! I pulled my coat about my ears as the wind whistled 
by, — I looked out through the chasms in the barrack sides at 
the clear, cold moonshine, — I looked up at the dense smoke 
hiding the roof, — I looked around at men's faces as the camp- 
fires lighted them up, — and I wished again that the men and 
women at home might see and hear these men, and be glad as I 
was in their devotion, and learn, as I did, something from their 
cheerful endurance. It gave me the old feeling of shame that 
I was not with them in body as well as in heart, and my citi- 
zen's dress seemed to me as a badge of disgrace, while the con- 
trast between the scene before me and the comforts I came 
from, and should return to, was painful indeed. It is a good 
gift of God that the soldier can be so content in his lot, — as 
we said, — * asking no questions of the future, but taking the 
present as it comes.* 

" I went in and out all over that camp, and I saw much the 
same thing repeated everywhere. A happier, more contented 
set of men you would not find. Bound they knew not where, 



EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS. 185 

— Iwisbed that I did not, — the one desire seemed to be to 
get this thing through that they might be at home again. As I 
threaded my way out, I heard one man, sitting by the fire, say, 
in half soliloquy, ' Who would think this was Sunday night ! * — 
* Little enough like the old Sunday nights at home,' I said in 
passing; and I walked out into the night, and by the chal- 
lenges of the guard, and over the fields, and looked back at the 
camp and down upon the great city, and heard the evening bells, 
and knew how well-dressed, comfortable people would soon be 
gathered to their worship, little imagining what Sunday night 
was to those who suffer peril, privation, absence from hcmie, 
and all civil pleasure and privilege, that they might enjoy 
churches and home in quiet I 4oubt not there was in the 
camp, that night, as hearty service in many a heart as in the 
city cathedral, chapel, or church. 

" On Monday, 9th, I again made my way to their camp. K 
you had my eyes, you could realize better than you can with 
the help of my pen, how the inexorable laws of military rank 
showed themselves in the matter of the different head-quarters. 
The division commander and his staff were in the mansion- 
house of the ever-venerable Charles Carroll, outside the lines. 
The brigade commander and his staff were in a two-story build- 
ing, no way near as good as my old bam ; the staff and line of 
the regiment were in a similar building, but they seemed to have 
about as much room for all of them as the brigade-commander 
had to himself Even in such details, in a casual camp, you 
are impressed with the difference that a little priority in rank 
makes. And now from regimental quarters, even to company 
quarters, from the tight walls and roof of the barrack to the 
gaping sides and roof c^ the stable, from the comfortable stove, 
16* 



186 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

though its nose be thrust out of a window, to the fires of logs 
all up and down the sitting, dining, sleeping room — all in one 
— of our friends of * the rank and file,* — the contrast is very 
great — yes, painful ; none the less so because the men bear it 
so well. Speaking to the officers of the state of things, more 
than one said he had tried to go through the smoke, and had 
given it up. 

"Tuesday came. During the night had come up one of 
those rains for which this latitude is a little too famous. There 
is no half-way about them. I had waked, more than once, 
and thought of the poor fellows out there in the camp in the 
mud, — for this stable of theirs had no floor to it, and was on 
the slope of the hilL As soon as I could, I pulled on my cav- 
alry boots, and in the old 'Reserve Guard* overcoat, minus 
the buttons of brass, made my way to the city, and filling a 
carpet-bag with chewing and smoking tobacco, newspapers, pic- 
torial papers, dominoes, and various kinds of puzzles, started 
for camp. I found the stable more comfortable than I had 
feared, and distributed my treasures to eager hands and thank- 
ful lips, and, I think, hearts. It was a real pleasure to see the 
pipes filled, the quid rolled on the tongue, and men here and 
there settling themselves to their papers and games. The 
Twenty Second Iowa, on the other side of the stable, came in 
for a share, and as I heard one of them say over my shoulder, 
* That bag holds out like the widow's cruse,* I could not help 
wishing it did, and not one of those eight thousand men — the 
number is not contraband now — but should have had some- 
thing to comfort him that comfortless day. 

" Crossing the camp, I met, ankle deep in mud, Lieut Davis, 
whom I last saw in hospital, just fix>m home, looking exceed- 



EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS. 187 

ingly nice, but not quite well enough for such rough weather 
and work. Lieut Whitney, whom I had also seen while here 
wounded, I was sony to hear had been discharged. He is 
well spoken of by every one, and the last thing he said to me 
was that he hoped to get back to his regiment before it was all 
over. I think government is a * little rough* upon the men 
she can no longer use. It is a poor way, it is a mean way of 
reducing expenses, if that is the object. A man is something 
after all, even in such a crisis as this, and a man, scarred and 
disabled, should be * tenderly cared for.' No government can 
afford to be without a heart ! 

" On Wednesday the weather was clear and cooler, and though 
the chances were that camp would be broken up, one brigade 
having marched in the rain the day previous, 1 again took my 
bag, filled with paper, envelopes, pencils, and newspapers, and 
found our friends still in their old quarters. From inquiry I 
had learned they were in need of these things, but when I 
had satisfied their demands, I had still *a few more left.' 
Coming up to a squad of lovxi men, I said, * Any of you here 
would like some paper ? ' Not a word in reply. Every man 
seemed stolid and dumb. They sat about their logs, and 
looked in the fire. At last one, somewhat hesitatingly, got 
up, and put his hand in his pocket and drew out two or three 
pieces of ' fractional currency,' and said, * I shotdd like a lit- 
tle, but I don't know as I have money enough to pay for it' 
* My friend,' said I, * you haven't money enough to pay for it 
That isn't what I am at. If you want paper, take it and wel- 
come.' You should have seen the change, — up sprung those 
stolid, dumb men : * I should like a sheet of paper, if you 
please, sir.' ' Can you spare me an envelope ? * * Thank you, 



188 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Sir.' * I should like a pencil* I was the centre of eager men. 
You should have seen those hands stretched from all sides 
toward me, — hands grimed with dirt, but honest, and hearty, 
and loyal hands, that had been clasped in agony by dear ones 
far away, hands that had toiled for the dear country God has 
given us, — hands, dirty, indeed, but there was an expression 
in their fingers and palms as they eagerly waited for their 
turn, such as I never detected in the unsoiled, delicate hand 
of which some men as well as some women are foolishly vain. 
The same thing struck me that always does in hospital and 
camp, — a certain reserve and modesty. They asked for one 
or two sheets, or envelopes, but almost invariably replied to 
my inquiry, if that was really all they wanted, that they would 
like more if I had them to spare. Before I left, I saw many 
' writing home.' As I finished, one man came up to me and 
said, * Have you any more of the puzzles you had yesterday ? ' 
and I was sorry I had not Thinking the brigade must leave 
before I could come out, as rations again for fifteen days had 
been served, I said * Good-by ' and ' God bless you,' express- 
ing the hope that I might find out when they sailed, and give 
them one good, hearty Massachusetts cheer. 

" Sitting with the men on the knapsacks they piled for me, 
I felt that I came to know something of them, and in some 
sort as if I were a link between them and the home we all 
alike love. I found them a little inclined to be thoughtftil, not 
gloomy at all, but they had been disappointed in finding them- 
selves ordered on active duty just at the time that furloughs 
were being granted and they were feeling sure of reaching 
home. Some had not seen home since the day of that march 
from Camp Cameron, which none will forget I think that 



EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS. 189 

being here so long and inactive increased the feeling, and it 
would not surprise me if a little homesickness lurked under- 
neath. Their destination was a thing of uncertainty. They 
hoped not Petersburg, — many desired Louisiana ; but as soon 
as the rations were given they said, * You can't long keep things 
from an old soldier, — this means Wilmington or Savannah.' 
The leading topic seemed the coming home again in August 

" One would have supposed these men would stand in need 
of some of that aid we are so anxious at all times to give. 
What was my surprise to find them packing up their super- 
fluous baggage to send home ! They looked like men in very 
light marching order, but I believe a soldier has always some- 
thing he can do without. I was sorry to find they had not 
been paid recentiy. How unjust this seems ! 1 was glad to 
hear them praise Sheridan ; and glad, Mr. Editor, of another 
thing, — to hear them put Massachusetts first, and then Cstm- 
bridge a littie ahead of her ! Didn't I join hands with them 
there ? If you at home love the old city as well as we whose 
various duties call us away, and will keep her up not merely 
to what she has been, but to what she can be, we will do all 
we can to prove ourselves citizens of no mean city, of whose 
doings she need not be ashamed. 

" Before this stands in type they may have again looked 
upon the battle glare; they may have tasted reverse; they 
may have won some new honor to their flag, new laureb to 
themselves; they may have written their names among the 
immortal band whose fidelity and courage shall ensure that 
redemption of the country to which we are * marching on ! ' " 




CHAPTEE XYUI. 

Departure firom Baltimore — Arrival at SaTannah —r Desolation of the City — 

Sherman begins his March through the Carolinas — Conflagration — Gen. 

' Grover in Command of the Post — Music in the Park — Marching Orders. 

iJHE third brigade left Camp Carroll, Jan. 
13th, and, inarching through the streets of 
Baltimore, — its citizens not scowling at 
the troops as they did two years before, — 
took transports at the wharves, the Thirty 
Eighth embarking on the Oriental, in com- 
pany with the One Hundred and Seventy Fifth and 
One Hundred and Seventy Sixth New York. 

As usual, there were no cooking facilities ; but 
the men had brought excellent appetites from the 
Shenandoah Yalley, and two men found no dijffi- 
culty in eating a raw ham in the eight days' pas- 
sage. Stores were taken on board at Fortress 
Monroe, and, at three o'clock, p. m., of the 15th, 
the steamer took her departure for the South, ar- 
riving at the mouth of the Savannah River on the 
19th, where she remained waiting for a pilot until 
the 23d. 

No large ship had been up the main chajinel, 

(190) 



UP AND DOWN THE SHENANDOAH. 191 

through the obstructions, since the occupation of 
Savannah by Gen. Sherman ; and the undertaking 
was a delicate one. The men of the three regi- 
ments crowded the rigging and the deck, barely 
giving the pilot a chance to see his course; but 
had it been generally known that there were 
seventeen torpedoes still in the harbor, between 
the anchorage and the city, curiosity might not 
have been so active. 

The passage of the obstructions was successfully 
made, and the city reached before dark. The 
warehouses, the wharves, and the few citizens 
seen, all had a decayed, broken-down look ; and 
the fog hanging over the river added to the gloom- 
iness of the scene. On the Mississippi and in the 
Shenandoah Valley, the men of the Thirty Eighth 
had seen the destruction produced by actual con- 
flict, where the shot and shell had whirled through 
the air, and plunged into storehouse and dwelling ; 
here, they saw the effects of war on the prosperity 
of a thriving conamercial city, which had seen no 
battle horrors, but which had been shut up within 
itself, to live on its own resources. 

The regiment remained on board until morning, 
and then went into quarters in a warehouse on 
Bay Street, where it remauied until the 26th, the 



192 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

weather still being cool enough to make ice at 
night. At this time, Savannah presented a scene 
of desolation sad to behold, even in an enemy's 
country. Pools of green, stagnant water stood in 
the principal streets; the beautiful squares had 
been stripped of their railings and fences to build 
the shanties of Sherman's troops, who were en- 
camped all through the city; the houses, as well 
as the stores, were shut up, and apparently tenant- 
less ; the broad avenues were deserted, except by 
passing soldiers, who vainly tried to fathom the 
mystery of the closed blinds, wondering if this 
were not one of the charmed cities pictured by 
Eastern story-tellers; and a green mould, begin- 
ning at the basement, seemed to be creeping up 
the sides of the houses. 

Early Thursday morning, the 26th, the regiment 
left its quarters in Bay Street, and marched to the 
outskirts of the town, halting on the edge of a 
swamp, where the collection of dead mules and 
horses only awaited the rays of the summer sun 
to breed pestilence and death. Af first, it was 
supposed that the halt in this, the most dismal- 
looking place to be found in the vicinity of 
Savannah, was to be only a temporary one ; but, to 
the intense disgust of oflScers and men, orders were 



THE ARSENAX ON B^IBE. 193 

received to lay out a camp. However, as Sher- 
man's troops were breaking camp to begin their 
famous march through the Carolinas, boards were 
plenty ; and, in a few days, the regiment was more 
comfbrtably housed than it had yet been ; while 
the mules and horses were buried, the company 
streets graded, and every precaution taken to make 
the camp healthy. 

Sherman's army, after leaving Savannah, were 
obstructed in their march by the flooding of the 
low lands ; and it was still uncertain whether 
Hardee and Beauregard would* permit him to 
sweep through the country unopposed. Conse- 
quently, some commotion existed in the camps 
of the second division of the Nineteenth Corps, 
when a sudden explosion of shells took place at 
midnight on the .27th. At first, it was thought by 
some, that Sherman had been forced -back; but 
the church-bells beginning to ring, and the explo- 
sions becoming more rapid, the fact soon became 
apparent that the arsenal in which the rebel am- 
munition had been stored was 6n fire. A detach- 
ment from the regiment was sent for, and, imder 
direction of Lieut. Copeland, who took charge of 
the engines, did efiicient service in checking the 
progress of the fire, not, however, before it had 
17 



194 THE STORY ©F THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

destroyed a great many blocks of brick and stone 
buildings. The negroes worked manfully at the 
engines, some of them being struck by the frag- 
ments of falling shells, which were thrown at a 
great distance over the city ; but those of the in- 
habitants who were not immediately affected by 
the catastrophe, stood idly on the corners of the 
streets, with their hands in their pockets. 

Afterward, another call was made, for all who 
were in camp to go on guard in the streets to pre- 
vent pillaging; and the entire regiment remained 
until daylight, when, returning to camp, in an 
hour or two, the greater part were detailed for 
picket or fatigue. The fatigue duty consisted in 
unloading stores sent from Boston and New York to 
the " suffering poor," who were too lazy to unload 
it themselves. The duty of the regiment in Sa- 
vannah consisted in unloading commissary stores, 
furnishing guards and pickets, and building breast- 
works ; the men being on duty nearly every other 
night. 

Gradually, the people began to steal out of their 
houses, and business, which always followed in the 
track of the Union armies, became better ; but 
there was no loyalty yet. While the citizens con- 
descended to take the supplies of food furnished 



FALL OP CHARLESTON. 195 

by government and by the North, their sympathies 
were with Lee behind the breastworks of Rich- 
mond, and with Johnson in Carolina. As soon as 
Gen. Grover took command of the post, he set all 
the unemployed people, black and white, at work 
cleaning up the city, and, in a short time, the 
streets were drained, the squares put in order, and 
the dead animals buried. Concerts were given in 
the Park several times a week by the bands of the 
Ninth Connecticut and the Fourteenth New Hamp- 
shire, and special guards appointed to preserve 
order ; but, in spite of all the general could do for 
the comfort and pleasure of the citizens, they re- 
mained sulky. 

The clergymen, especially clung to the fortunes 
of the falling Confederacy ; and notwithstanding a 
large portion of their audience on Sunday consisted 
of Union oflScers and soldiers, not a word of sym- 
pathy was expressed for the government, nor a 
word of reprobation for the cruelties of Anderson- 
ville, which were casting a blot on the fair fame 
of Georgia never to be forgotten while one victim 
of that prison-pen survives. 

On Sunday the 19th, news was received of the 
evacuation of Charleston, and the guns of Fort 
Pulaski announced the fact to the unwilling ears 



196 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

of the citizens. The birthday of Washington was 
celebrated by the firing of salutes, ringing of bells, 
and a cessation from all unnecessary labor. Good 
news now began to pour in fast. The fall of 
Charleston was soon followed by that of Wilming- 
ton ; and the men began to lay plans, which they 
had never done before, of what they would do 
" when the war was over." But the JQurneyings 
of the Thirty Eighth were not yet at an end. By 
the time the " shebangs " were made comfortable, 
and the camp-ground in good condition, marching 
orders were received, and the brigade was notified 
to pack up preparatory to taking transports. 

On the 4th of March, the Twenty Fourth Iowa 
and the One Hundred and Seventy Sixth New 
York broke camp ; iand the. next day, the Thirty 
Eighth, the-One Hundred and Twenty Eighth, and 
the One Hundred and Fifty Sixth, accompanied by 
the band of the latter regiment, marched through 
the city, treating the citizens who were returning 
from church to a taste of Union music, and em- 
barked on the steamer Ashland. Not one of 
the six regiments composing the brigade having a 
colonel present, the command was conferred upon 
Col. Day, of the One Hundred and Thirty First 
New York. 




CHAPTEE XIX. 



HUton Head — Cape Fear River — Paroled Prisoners— TWlmington— Morehead 
City — Newbem — Back to Morehead — Fatigue Duty and Oysters - An 
Alarm — Battle of Petersburg — All aboard for Goldsborough — Sherman's 
Army — Surrender of Lee — wissaesination of the President — Surrender of 
Johnson — Morehead again — Transport — Rubber Coffee — Savannah. 



|T daylight, the steamer left the city arriving 
at Hilton Head about noon, where, after 
transferring the brigade head-quarters and 
a portion of the One Hundred and Fifty 
Sixth to another ship, she anchored for the 
night. Leaving Hilton Head the morning 
of the 7th, the mouth of Cape Fear River was 
reached about noon the next day. A flag was 
hoisted for a pilot ; but none responding, the cap- 
tain of the ship determined to follow the lead of 
another steamer, and go up to Wilmington. The 
Ashland was about a hundred yards astern of the 
other ship, when the latter suddenly grounded, 
and a collision seemed certain. Fortimately, there 
was time to change the direction, and the Ashland 
rubbed by, smashing a quarter-boat in the con- 
tact. Had the distance between the two vessels 

17 * (197) 



198 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

been a few yards less, the effect upon both might 
have been disastrous. 

Coming to an anchor off Fort Caswell, the troops 
had an opportunity to see the effects of heavy shot 
on an iron-clad, — one of the monitors that had 
taken part in the assault on Fort Fisher lying 
near. Soon a despatch-boat came alongside, with 
orders for the vessel to run up as^ far as Smith- 
ville, and there await further instructions. 

While anchored off Smithville, a boat came down 
the river loaded with paroled prisoners, among 
them a number of the Thirty Eighth, who had 
been captured at Cedar Creek, had been sent to 
Salisbury prison, and were paroled upon the ap- 
proach of Sherman's cavalry. They all told the 
same old story of hunger and exposure. 

After some delay, a pilot was procured, and the 
steamer started again for Wilmington, but owing 
to a thick fog, did not reach the city until morn- 
ing, when, as she was hauling into the wharf, a 
harbor-master hailed the captain, wanting to know 
what brought him there when he had orders to go 
to sea. Down went the anchor again, and Lieut.- 
Col. Richardson went on shore to report, and see 
if anybody knew anything about the third brigade 
of the second division of the Nineteenth Army 



NEWBERN. 199 

Corps. Getting instructions, the lieutendnt-colonel 
returned, and the ship again steamed down the 
river. Passing by Eorts Anderson and Caswell, by 
the obstructions in the river, and by the wreck of 
Admiral Porter's mock-monitor, the ship again 
anchored, and waited for the fog to lift. In the 
afternoon, a pilot came aboard, and, it being then 
clear, the steamer stood out to sea, the earthworks 
of Fort Fisher looming up like hills in the dis- 
tance. 

After a pleasant voyage along the coast of North 
Carolina, the transport reached Morehead City on 
the afternoon of the 8th, and landed the troops, 
who marched through the straggling village, and 
stacked arms beside the railroad track. The place 
was full of rumors in regard to fighting at Kins- 
ton, where Johnston was trying to overpower Scho- 
field before the arrival of Sherman ; and all the 
available troops were being sent to the front. 

At eight o'clock, t. m., the regiment crowded 
into and on top of its portion of an immense 
train of box -cars, and after a moonlight ride 
through the turpentine forests of North Carolina, 
reached Newbern at midnight, waking the town 
with cheers ; for the brisk March air made the blood 
run quick, and the men were in the best of spirits. 



200 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Disembarking at the depot, the regiment stacked 
arms, and soon numerous camp-fires were blazing, 
and the indispensable cofiee boiling. 

The rumors had grown less warlike as the train 
approached Newbern; and upon arriving at that 
place, the troops were informed that th6y were just 
too late, — that the fighting was all over, and that 
their services were not needed. The men of the 
third brigade had been in the field too long to be 
" spoiling for a fight," and were not sorry at being 
" counted out " of a battle just on the eve of 
peace. 

The night was sufficiently frosty to harden the 
ground ; and after drinking their coffee, the men 
spread their blankets, and were soon in repose. In 
the morning, the brigade marched a short distance 
beyond the city, and quartered in buildings for- 
merly occupied as a hospital. 

Newbern had been occupied for so long a time 
by the Union forces, that its garrison had acquired 
habits different from those in vogue in campaign- 
ing regiments ; and the advent in their midst of 
such a brigade as the third made quite a commo- 
tion. As soon as they had stacked arms, the men, 
as usual, began to hunt for boards and other arti- 
cles to make themselves comfortable, in case of 



MOREUEAD CITY. 201 

going into camp in the vicinity. In an out-build- 
ing, some A tents were found packed away ; and, 
as A tents were a luxury the Thirty Eighth had 
not known for many days, they were at once ap- 
propriated. A commissary sergeant of a certain 
Massachusetts regiment soon came after the prop- 
erty, saying that they belonged to his company, 
and that he would be responsible for them. " No, 
you wont," said the Company E boys, whose por- 
tion of the prize was claimed. " You can account 
for them as lost in action." This way of account- 
ing for property was beyond the commissary's ex- 
perience, and he invoked the aid of the adjutant 
to recover the tents. He supposed that he got 
them, but afterward two canvas structures tow- 
ered suspiciously above the dog-tents at More- 
head. 

There being no call for the services of the regi- 
ment at Newbern, it was sent back to Morehead 
City, arriving at that place in the afternoon, and 
going into camp in a grave-yard, between the rail- 
road track and the river. The Nineteenth Corps 
was pretty well broken up at this time, — the first 
division being still in the Valley with Sheridan, 
the second division scattered through Georgia and 
Carolina, and the third division in Louisiana. 



202 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY* EIGHTH. 

Morehead City had been selected as the base of 
supplies for Sherman' s army, and wharves were be- 
ing built, storehouses erected, and additional . rail- 
road tracks laid, while the harbor was crowded with 
vessels of all descriptions, awaiting their turn to be 
unloaded. The work of unloading the ships and 
loading the cars was done principally by the men of 
the third brigade, assisted by colored soldiers and 
contrabands ; and there was no cessation of labor, 
night or day, — one detail going on, when another 
came oflf. As a relief to the hard work, oysters and 
clams were to be procured in abundance a few 
hundred yards from the camp ; and, as soon as the 
tide receded, the beach was covered with oyster- 
men. 

Nothing occurred to break the monotony of the 
daily and nightly fatigue duty till Sunday, March 
26th, when one of the old Louisiana style of 
" scares " took place. The assembly sounded, the 
regiment formed in line, and the pickets were re- 
inforced ; but beyond the blaze and smoke from a 
large fire in the pine woods, and the occasional dis- 
charge of a piece of artillery, no signs of any 
enemy were seen, and it soon appeared that the 
alarm had been occasioned by the report of an 
" intelligent contraband," that the enemy was 



GOLDSBOROUGH. 203 

marching on Morehcad in force, — said contraband 
having heard a battery practising at a target. 

April 7, the great news of the battle in front of 
Richmond and Petersburg, resulting in the defeat 
of Lee, was read to the troops, causing much re- 
joicing, although they did not commit such extrav- 
agances as the speculators in the exchanges of 
New York and Boston, — accounts of Whose pro- 
ceedings were read with amazement by the soldiers 
in the field. 

A change had been made in the military pro- 
gramme, and Morehead was no longer to be the 
great base of supplies. At noon of the 8th, orders 
were received to pack up, and three o'clock, p. m., 
found the Thirty Eighth and the One Hundred 
and Fifty Sixth again on the road to Newborn on 
platform cars. Newborn was not the destination, 
however; and the train finally reached Golds- 
borough at three o'clock in the morning. Great 
numbers of recruits and high -bounty men had 
passed over the road lately; and, at the various 
wood and water stations, the old soldiers gathered 
around the train with such queries as, " How 
much bounty did you get ? " " How long did you 
enlist for ? " " Where's your cow ? " etc. One 
fellow, trying to get a nearer look in the moon- 



204 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

light, exclaimed, " Why, they are colored troops." 
So they were " colored," compared with many who 
had passed over the road lately. When it was 
known that the brigade had been " in the Valley 
with Sheridan," there was a change in the tone of 
the remarks. 

The regiment bivouacked near the depot till 
morning, when the back mails that had been sent 
to Savannah, arrived, and were assorted. Sher- 
man's entire army was encamped about Goldsbor- 
ough ; and the five corps broke camp, and began 
the march toward Raleigh the day after the arrival 
of the Thirty Eighth. Among all that force of 
veteran troops, none appeared to better advantage, 
or had a more military bearing, than the famous 
Thirty Third Massachusetts, who had charged under 
Joe Hooker at Lookout Mountain, and who had 
marched from Atlanta to Savannah, and thence 
to Goldsborough. 

Upon the departure of Gen. Schofield, Gen. 
Birge was left in command of the post, and the 
Thirty Eighth selected to do duty in the town, — 
Cos. A, B, D, and K as provost guards, and the 
remaining six companies to guard the commissary- 
stores. 

Two days after the departure of Sherman's 



SURRENDER OP JOHNSTON. 205 

troops, the news of Lee's surrender was received, 
and glad enough were the men of the Thirty 
Eighth that the grand old Army of the Potomac 
had the honor of giving the finishing stroke to the 
rebellion. 

While the whole army was jubilant at the speedy 
prospect of peace, and of the country being once 
more imited, and when a feeling of pity for the 
defeated rebels was becoming prevalent among 
the soldiers, a wild rumor reached Goldsborough 
on the 17th that President Lincoln had been assas- 
sinated. The news was so horrible that it was not 
believed, and the next day it was reported that he 
had received only a slight flesh wound. 

Then came the tidings that Johnston had surren- 
dered his entire force to Sherman; and, without 
knowing the precise terms, — willing to put all 
confidence in Sherman's integrity, — the soldiers 
in North Carolina gave way to an enthusiasm that 
none of the previous victories had excited. All 
day they poured into the government printing-office 
to learn if the report was official ; and crowds 
gathered about the orders posted on the buildings. 
But the next day, the report of the assassination 
was confirmed ; and then a revulsion of feeling took 
place, and Eastern and Western men alike, in stern 

18 



206 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

tones, hoped that hostilities would be resumed. 
Pew of the citizens of Raleigh or Goldsborough 
dreamed of the slumbering fire in their midst, that 
the least provocation would have fanned into a 
flame that would have destroyed all before it ; and 
it required all of Gen. Sherman's tact to keep his 
men quiet. . 

The paroled rebel soldiers, to their credit be it 
said, were unanimous in denouncing the assassina- 
tion ; and were determined to allow of no guerilla 
warfare in the State, now that the main armies had 
surrendered. Perfect good feeling existed between 
the late belligerents, although it was rather tanta- 
lizing to the Union soldiers, who had been from 
home so long, to see the ladies crowd around and 
caress the gray jackets. 

The terms of Johnston's surrender not proving 
acceptable at Washington, a new arrangement was 
made ; and the lieutenant-general himself came on 
to ratify it. On his return, while passing through 
Goldsborough, a wheel came off the engine, and 
the general was obliged to leave the car, and wait 
for another locomotive. The news soon spread 
that Gen. Grant was in town ; and he was flanked 
at every turn by the admiring soldiers, who didn't 
ask him for a speech^ however. 



COFFEE EXPERIENCES. 207 

The companies on provost were quartered in 
the Court House ; and those doing guard duty- 
had erected comfortable " shebangs," with the hope 
of occupying them until they left for home, when 
marching orders were received, and colored troops 
arrived to relieve them. Breaking camp during 
the evening of the 1st of May, the regiment bivou- 
acked in the grounds of the Court House till morn- 
ing, and then took the cars for Morehead City. 

At all the little settlements on the road, women 
waved their handkerchiefs, probably glad enough 
to see the stream of blue-coats again turned north- 
ward. Passing through Newborn, the train reached 
Morehead about sundown, and the regimeni; bivou- 
acked in the old camp-ground, among the graves, 
where it remained until the 4th, when it embarked 
on the transport Thetis, in company with the One 
Hundred and Twentieth New York and the divia" 
ion horses ! 

The men thought they had already tasted every 
flavor capable of being produced from coffee ; but 
a new experience awaited them on this transport. 
The drink was made by putting the ground coffee 
in an empty pork-barrel, and letting on steam 
through a rubber hose ; and the result was a bev- 
erage in which the taste of the barrel, the rubber 



208 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

hose, the cask-water, and the coffee, struggled for 
the mastery. One ration was suflBcient for some 
companies, although the New York boys drank 
a quart of it twice or three times a day. 

On the morning of the 6th, after a search of sev- 
eral hours for Hilton Head, the oflScers of the 
steamer ascertained their whereabouts ; and, at 
noon, the* ship arrived off the Savannah River, 
when a pilot was procured, and the voyage con- 
tinued to Savannah. The troops remained on 
board until Sunday morning ; when they disem- 
barked, and took possession of the camps just 
vacated by a portion of the first brigade, which had 
gone to Augusta. 




CHAPTEE XX. 

Change in Sarannah — Southern Ladies and Clergy — Portion of the Brigade go 
to Augusta— Habits of the Country People — Jeff. Dayis — Cos. C and G go 
to Darien — Arrival of First Division — Scarcity of Muster Rolls — Want of 
Transportation — Start for Home — Gkillop's Island — Reception in Cam- 
bridge. 

AY ANN AH had changed essentially within 
the past two months. By the surrender 
of Lee and Johnston, all hopes of estab- 
lishing Southern independence were at an 
end ; and the people were evidently about 
to submit quietly, and make the best of 
their situation. The streets swarmed with paroled 
rebels ; and the gold stripes and fine imiforms of 
the Union staff oflBcers had no attractions in the 
eyes of the ladies, compared with the simple gray 
jackets of those they had sent into the field, and 
whom they now warmly welcomed home, notwith- 
standing the failure of their arms. The tenacity 
with which the females of the Southern States climg 
to their cause, and the great sacrifices which they 
made for it, could not but win the respect of those 
who witnessed it ; and seldom did a Union soldier, 

18 * (209) 



210 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

no matter what might be the provocation, treat 
them with other than the most respectful courtesy. 
But no such feelings were felt for the clergy, who 
were equally devoted to the rebel cause. Preach- 
ers of the gospel of peace, they had been foremost 
in fomenting the rebellion ; they had never lifted 
their voices against the cruelties of the prisons, 
— which exceeded those of Morocco in her worst 
days, — or tried in the least to soften the barbarities 
of war ; and now, when all hope of Southern suc- 
cess was at an end, and resistance to the govern- 
ment, either active or passive, a crime, they yielded 
a sullen submission, or opposed a petty resistance 
to the acts of the military rulers. And it is a 
strange fact, that, even in the Northern pulpit, the 
demands for vengeance against the military leaders 
of the Confederacy were greater than any that 
proceeded from the army; and more than one 
minister advocated the breaking of the agreement 
on the faith of which Lee surrendered to G^n. 
Grant, — a proceeding which would have been 
looked upon with disgust by every soldier in the 
army, as much as they detested Lee and his trea- 
son. As the Thirty Eighth Regiment never had 
the services of a chaplain, even to give then- dead 
comrades a Christian burial, perhaps they were not 
properly instructed. 



REGIMENTS BBEAKING CAMP. 211 

Not only in the appearance and sentiments of 
the citizens had a change taken place in Savannah ; 
but the city itself had greatly improved under the 
auspices of Gen. Grover, and it had become one of 
the most desirable places in which to do garrison 
duty in the South. Time hung heavily, however, 
on the hands of the men of the Thirty Eighth. 
The war was over ; the object for which they 
had volunteered was accomplished ; and now they 
wished to lay aside their uniforms, and resume 
their citizenship. Beside, every mail from the 
North brought accounts of the mustering out of 
troops, and of the reduction of the army. 

On the 11th of May, the second brigade and the 
Twenty Fourth Iowa and the One Hundred and 
Twenty Eighth New York broke camp, to march 
to Augusta, leaving the remaining regiments of 
the third brigade to do the light picket -duty, 
which was now merely nominal, and which was 
kept up chiefly to prevent an illicit trade between 
the city and the country before proper regulations 
were established. 

The appearance and habits of the country peo- 
ple, who daily passed out and in the lines, were 
amusing to men who had been accustomed to the 
New England way of doing things. Some of them 



212 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

came thirty miles to market, with a dozen or two 
of eggs, a pair of chickens, and a few vegetables. 
It took them one day to come, another to do their 
bushiess, and a third to return. And then such 
veliicles were never seen north of Mason and Dix- 
on's line. The women generally accompanied their 
husbands, and rode on the mule attached to the 
wagon, with a snuflf-stick or a pipe in their mouth. 
Sometimes, on reaching the picket-fire, they would 
take the snufi'-stick out, and get one of the pickets 
to light their pipe ; and, if reports were true, when 
the pipe went out, a quid of tobacco would take its 
place. This custom of snufl-dipping appeared, to 
be practised chiefly in Georgia and North Carolina, 
— in the latter State, ladies of intelligence and 
refinement indulging in the habit: it was not 
observed in Louisiana. 

Little occurred during the remainder of the stay 
in Savannah to break the monotony of camp-life, 
or which is deserving of record. The regiment 
daily looked for orders which would send them 
home, and all the conversation and thought of the 
men turned to that theme. On the 16th, Jefi*. 
Davis passed down the river, on the way to Hilton 
Head. A portion of the Sixth U. S. Regulars ar- 
rived on the 21st, and quartered in the town, — 



ARRIVAL OF TROOPS IN SAVANNAH. 218 

all branches of the service being now represented, 
regulars, volunteers, and colored troops. The 
dress-parades of the latter were attended by al- 
most the entire colored population, who, upon 
the close of the parade, swarmed through the 
principal avenues, monopolizing the sidewalks, to 
the annoyance of the white citizens, and the 
amusement of the soldiers. 

Thursday, June 1, Co's C and 6, under com- 
mand of Capt. Bennett, started for Darien, Ga., 
with twenty days' rations ; and the regiment gave 
up all hope of getting home before their full time 
was served. The picket was taken off on the 2d, 
and restrictions to trade removed; and the only 
duty to be done consisted in furnishing a few 
guards to watch the breastworks. 

The re-enlisted regiments of the first division of 
the Nineteenth Corps began to arrive in Savannah 
on the 5th of June, for the purpose of relieving 
those troops whose time would expire before the 
1st of November ; and the hopes of getting home 
in a few days arose again. On the 7th, the first 
brigade reached the city from Augusta; and, on 
the 9th, the Twenty Fourth Iowa, and the One 
Hundred and Fifty Sixth, the One Hundred and 
Seventy Fifth, and One Hundred and Seventy 



214 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Sixth New York began the inarch for that 
place. 

Time had never passed so slowly with the regi- 
ment before, as during this month of June, when 
there was nothing to do but to talk of home all 
the long summer-day. Some tried to pass tlie 
time in picking blackberries ; some in manufactur- 
ing bone rings, corps badges, and other trinkets ; 
while others, and in the afternoon this class in- 
cluded nearly the whole regiment, sought refuge 
in sleep. The occasional arrival of a mail brought 
a little change ; but then the letters and papers 
were all filled with accounts of the return home of 
regiments, and with the anxiety with which friends 
awaited the Thirty Eighth. Attempts were made 
to excite an interest in drilling ; but it was up-hiQ 
work, and officers and men alike soon tired of it. 

Orders, at last, came from department head- 
quaiiiers to muster out the regiment ; and on the 
9th, the officers began to work on a few copies 
of blank rolls that had been received; but Go's 
C and G were still absent, and delegations from 
the camp hourly visited the wharves, and closely 
scanned every approaching steamer, to be the first 
to herald their arrival. The first question upon 
awakuig in the morning was, " Have C and G got 



WAITING FOR TRANSPORTATION. 216 

back yet ? " At length, the well known beat of 
drummer Howe was heard in the camp, and the 
men rushed out of their tents to greet their com- 
rades, who were never so welcome before. Major 
Allen, who had been acting as provost marshal at 
Augusta, joined the regiment the same day, and 
other detailed men were returned to their com- 
mands. 

By some oversight in the chief mustering officers' 
department, there were no blank-rolls on hand, and 
none arrived imtil the 23d; but then all other 
duties were at once suspended, including an in- 
spection which was to have taken place, and the 
officers worked night and day on the rolls. On 
the 26th, the recruits, and the colored under-cooks 
who had been enlisted at Baton Rouge, less than 
thirty in all, were transferred to the Twenty Sixth 
Massachusetts, leaving the regiment with less than 
three hundred of the ten hundred and forty who 
had left the State three summers previously. 

Finally, the papers were all completed ; but 
there was no transportation. It seemed to be the 
fate of the regiment to serve tits full time out. 
Every other regiment organized under the call of 
1862 had already reached home ; and, on account 
of their being a greater portion of their time in 



216 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTII. 

a distant department, probably fewer men of the 
Thirty Eighth had ever received furloughs than 
those of any other command. Ill feeling began to 
arise between the men and the officers, the former, 
in their nervous, excited state, charging their offi- 
cers with not using proper exertions to get home. 
A few words, however, from the lieut.-colonel, at 

r 

the close of the last dress-parade that took place, 
on the evening of the 29th, cleared away the 
cloud and restored good feeling. 

In the forenoon of June 30, the welcome orders 
came, " strike tents, to go home." The orders had 
scarcely left the mouths of the orderlies, before the 
men were swarming on the roofs of the shebangs. 

The shelter-tents and mosquito-nets, with all 
property belonging to the government, except guns 
and equipments, were at once turned in, and the 
knapsacks packed ready to start. 

An order had been issued by the war depart- 
ment, a short time previously, allowing the soldiers 
to keep their gims and equipments by paying six 
dollars each for them, — about the price they 
would bring at a public sale ; nearly all the men 
in the Thirty Eighth had concluded to take them, 
and for several days previous to this had been 
busily at work, polishing the barrels, varnishing 



HOMEWABD BOUND. 217 

the stocks, and making covers to keep them in 
good order on the passage home. 

At five o'clock, the assembly was blown, the regi- 
mental line formed, and, escorted by the drum- 
corps of the One Hundred and Twenty Eighth 
New York, the regiment marched through the 
city, with muzzled guns, and embarked on the 
steamer Fairbanks, — a small blockade - runner, 
barely large enough to accommodate the reduced 
command. 

The boat left the wharf at eleven o'clock, and 
proceeded down the river, anchoring at the mouth 
until daylight, when she steamed up to Hilton 
Head, to land a portion of the cargo. At two, 
p. M., she left Hilton Head, and steered north. It 
was the general desire to reach home before the 
4th of July, but the sailing qualities displayed by 
the transport during the first two days dis- 
pelled that hope. On the afternoon of Wednes- 
day, Gay's Head was made, — the first New Eng- 
land land the majority of the regiment had seen 
for three years. A pilot was taken oflF Holmes's 
Hole, and the men retired to their quarters with 
the expectation of being in Boston Bay before 
morning. J8ut it was the day after the Fourth, 
and the lights looked hazy to the eyes of the old 

19 



218 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

pilot ; SO he concluded to anchor back of Cape Cod 
until morning. The cool northern breeze was in 
striking contrast to the soft summer airs of Sa- 
vannah; and the men shivered under the slight 
clothing they had brought. 

In the morning, the ship weighed anchor, and 
continued the voyage. It seemed as if Cape Cod 
would never be doubled: headland succeeded 
headland, until, flhally, the point was passed, and 
the bay entered. As the towns and villages on 
the South Shore came in sight, eager eyes were 
strained to catch a glimpse of the one spot so long 
the object of thought. The luxuriant banks of 
the Mississippi, or the historical ones of the Poto- 
mac, had no charms compared with the dwarfed 
shrubbery of Cohasset, of Scituate, of Marshfield, 
and of Plymouth. 

At nine o'clock, the steamer cast anchor off Deer 
Island. The pilot objected to taking her up to the 
wharf without a permit from the health officers ; 
and the lieut.-colonel and Surgeon Ward went on 
shore, and procured the necessary papers. But 
the regiment was not allowed to get home so 
easily. Just as the mouth of the harbor was en- 
tered, a sputtering little quartermaster's boat came 
alongside and ordered the captain to land the 



gallop's island. 219 

troops at Gallop's Island. The lieutenant-colo- 
nel, however, had been too long in the field to 
take orders from every boy who talked loudly, 
and directed the captain to proceed to the wharf. 
When off Long Wharf, the tug -boat again came 
alongside, and the oflScer, in a more respectful tone, 
informed the commander of the regiment that the 
order for the troops to land on the island was from 
head-quarters, and, at the same time, offered to 
take him on shore to report. It was now mid- 
night; and there being no hope of landing, the 
men left the decks and retired. 

The morning opened with a cold rain ; and at 
nine o'clock, the steamer proceeded to Gallop's 
Island, where the regiment landed, and went into 
quarters in barracks. Here, in sight of the homes 
from which most of them had been absent for three 
years, the men remained while the muster-out rolls 
were being examined, and preparations made to 
pay them. Three passes to each company were 
allowed for twenty-four hours ; but a majority of 
the men lived at such a distance that they were of 
no avail. 

In the meantime, the City of Cambridge had 
been making great preparations to give the entire 
regiment a reception ; and the furloughed soldiers 



220 THE STORY OF THE THIRTT EIGHTH. 

were everywhere questioned in the streets by the 
school-children as to their discharge. 

The rolls were at last pronounced correct ; and 
on the evening of the 12th5 the paymaster an- 
nounced his intention of coming to the island the 
next morning. A grand illumination of the bar- 
racks took place that night, while the rolls were 
being signed; and the oflScers on duty on the 
island found it difficult to enforce the order in 
regard to putting out the lights at taps. Early on 
the morning of the 13th, the companies formed in 
line, marched to the office of the paymaster, signed 
the rolls for eleven months' pay, and received the 
honorable discharge so eagerly looked forward to. 
Then, taking passage on the ferry-boat the regi- 
ment landed on Commercial Wharf, where it was 
met by the Committee of Eeception from Cam- 
bridge, who had provided teams to carry the knap- 
sacks. 

Headed by Gilmore's band, the regiment marched 
through Boston to Craigie's Bridge, where its 
arrival was announced by a salute, and by the 
ringing of bells. A long procession here awaited 
to escort it through East and Old Cambridge to the 
pavilion erected at Cambridgeport. The military 
companies appeared with full members ; the Reserve 



HOME AGAIN. 221 

Guard, — in whose ranks were noticed old friends 
who had visited the regiment in field and camp, — 
had left their business to welcome the returned 
volunteers; the firemen had decorated and pol- 
ished their engines imtil they looked like elab- 
orate pieces of ornamental work ; a cavalcade of 
ladies, dressed with exquisite taste and with 
cheeks freshened by the spirited exercise, graced 
the occasion with their presence ; while thousands 
of school-children, bubbling over with joy, lined 
the streets. 

And in addition to all, there were old comrades- 
in-arms, — some who had been stricken down by 
the storm of lead that filled the air on that June 
Sunday at Port Hudson; others who, woimded 
and faint, had anxiously watched the ebb and flow 
of victory at the Opequan; still others who had 
experienced the horrors of Salisbury, after the 
surprise at Cedar Creek. Not until then did the 
men know how close were the ties that bound those 
together who for months or years had shared a 
common lot. But the regiment was now in the 
hands of its friends ; and the account of its re- 
ception will be told in the words of the " Cam^ 
bridge Chronicle" of the following Saturday^ 
greatly condensed, however : — 

19* 



222 THE STORY OP THB THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Thursday last (the day of the reception of the gallant 
Thirty Eighth regiment, three full companies of which were 
recruited from this city) was the greatest day Cambridge has 
ever known. Every heart beat high with exultant joy and 
pride, for there was not a citizen, young or old, who did not 
have a special interest in the patriot soldiers whose return 
has made us all so happy in the repossession of our brave 
soldier sons, brothers, husbands, and friends. 

The reception was a magnificent testimonial of the esteem 
in which the services of our soldiers are held by a grateful 
people. It was an ovation, wherein the whole people, the 
young and the old, the rich and the poor, united together to 
do honor to the citizen soldiers who went forth to secure the 
blessings of Liberty, Union, and Peace to a distracted country. 
Right nobly have they accomplished their holy work ! Afler 
many weary marches, through many a battle and skirmish, 
their patient endurance has been rewarded by victory so com- 
plete, that it would seem to be the termination of rebellion 
in this country forever, and of the foul spirit that inaugurated 
and controlled it. 

Never has our city worn a happier, a more brilliant, or a 
more social aspect. The streets were thronged vdth the peo- 
ple, who seemed anxious to express by their presence, their 
joy at the return of our volunteers. Their lively holiday 
attire added largely to the gay appearance, which the decora- 
tions that met the eye on every hand, gave to the streets 
through which the procession marched. 

The reception was as honorable to the city as it was cred- 
itable to the feelings that prompted it, and must have been 
particularly gratifying to the regiment, fix)m the fact that it 
has had no trumpeter to blazon forth its every act, and to 
continually reiterate the assertion that in the prosecution of 
the holy war it has excelled all other regiments. The uni- 
versality of the demonstrations of "Welcome Home," — the 
approving cheers, the cordial grasping of hands, the thanks 
beaming from every eye attested that its course had been 



THE RECEPTION. 223 

anxiously marked and highly approved, — that, having en- 
listed for the war, they realized that their duty was plain : 

, " Theirs not to reason why, 
Theirs but to do or die." 

THE RECEPTION. 

The morning of the 13th dawned, but no bright sunlight 
gave promise of a pleasant day; many forebodings of rain, 
troubled the good citizens of Cambridge, which, as the day 
progressed, were banished by the dispersion of threatening 
clouds, and nature exhibited as magnificent a day as the 
most critical could desire for the reception of the gallant heroes 
of the Thirty Eighth. 

The regiment arrived at Cragie's Bridge about half past 
twelve, — when the Cambridge Light Battery, Capt. Adams, 
consisting of ex-members of the Ninth and Eleventh Batteries 
thundered forth the loud welcoming notes, which proclaimed to 
the anxiously awaiting citizens that the hour of doubt had 
passed ; that Cambridge had at last received her noble heroes 
within her own borders. 

Warm, indeed, was the reception at the bridge ; • great, 
indeed, was the temptation to break ranks, but discipline over- 
came the waverings of affection toward relations and friends 
long separated, and with firm, elastic step, and with joyous 
smiles, the veterans, headed by their loved lieutenant-colonel, 
who has been acting colonel nearly all the time they have been 
in service, passed through the open ranks of the thousands who 
had assembled to do them honor. On — on through the long 
line they passed, greeted by cheers which can only be given 
when the heart is in full sympathy vdth its object. The gal- 
lant colonel, bareheaded, bowed his head on either side in 
acknowledgment of the tokens of regard, and so they passed 
to Cambridge Street Here the procession was formed as fol- 



224 THE STOEY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

ORDER OF PROCESSION. 

A Detachment of Police, under the command of Chief Stimpson. 
Morse's Brass Band, twenty-one pieces. 

MILITARY. 

Slst Unattached Co. M. V. M., Capt. Torrey, sixty -eight men. 

84th Unattached Co. M. V. M., Capt. Harrington, seventy-one men. 

12th Unattached Co. M. V. M., Lieut. Leland, seventy-five men. 

Under command of Capt. Meacham. 

Cambridge Reserve Guard, Capt. Bullard, seven ty-ive men. 

Cambridge Cadets, Capt. Beach, numbering thirty-eight. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Steam Fire Engine, No. 1, Capt Rollins, eighteen men. 
Steam Fire Engine, No. 2, Capt. Cade, twenty-two men. 
Steam Fire Engine, No. 8, Capt. Murphy, twenty-one men. 
Franklin Hook and Ladder Co., Capt. Frazer, twenty-four men. 

Hydrant Engine Co. Ne. 4, Capt. Parker, forty-five men. 

Daniel Webster Engine Co. No. 6, Capt. Marston, thirty-five men. 

Under command of Capt, George B. Eaton, Chief Engineer. 

Aid. Chief Marshal, Major George E. Richardson. Aid. 

Cambridge Brass Band, twenty pieces. 

COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS. 

Greorge P. Carter, Alpheus Mead, John S. Sawyer, Nathan G. Gooch, 

William Daily. 

Returned Officers of the United States Army, mounted and in uniform. 

Returned soldiers and past members of the Thirty Eighth, and other 

Regiments, under the command of Capt. Wyman, 120 men. 

Wounded and Disabled Soldiers in Carriages. 

Gilmore's Band, twenty-four pieces. 

THIRTY EIGHTH MASS. REGIMENT, 

Under command of Col. James P. Richardson. 

Car, with thirty-six young ladies, dressed in white, with appropriate 

badges, representing the different States of the Union, 

under the direction of J. W. Whittier. 

Mounted Cavalry Band, ten pieces. 

Cavalcade — finely mounted and caparisoned — consisting of thirty-five 

young ladies and upwards of two hundred gentlemen, under 

the command of John C. Stiles, Esq., assisted by 

0. G. Jones and W. A. Ward. 



THE PROCESSION, ETC. 225 

MOVING OF THE PROCESSION — DECORATIONS, &C. 

The procession moved from Cragie's Bridge under a line 
of flags and streamers, — upon which appeared the mottoes, 
"Heroes of 1862, worthy sons of the heroes of 1776. AVe 
wielcome our brave defenders." 

The procession passed up Cambridge Street under a line of 
flags and streamers, and a large shield bearing the inscriptions, 
" All hail to the Stars and Stripes." " Honor to the brave 
defenders of the Star-Spangled Banner." 

The grand feature of the reception in East Cambridge was 
presented between Fourth and Fifth Streets. Here ropes had 
been drawn along each side of Cambridge Street, and on the 
south side were ranged about eight hundred children from the 
public schools in East Cambridge, bearing small flags and bou- 
quets in their hands. The Putnam and Thorndike Grammar 
Schools were designated by shield-like bannerets, bearing the 
names of the schools. On the opposite side of the street, a 
long table was spread with a bounteous supply of cake, pies, 
sandwiches, and other tempting baits to hungry men, to appease 
their appetites. This pleasing feature was an impromptu one, 
conceived by the ladies on the evening previous, and executed 
in good taste. 

As the procession passed this point, the school children sang 
patriot songs of welcome. When the veterans reached it they 
were halted for a few minutes, and partook of a light collation 
provided for them, washing it down vdth tea or coffee as they 
preferred. This being accomplished, it was the children's turn 
at presentation. They presented their bouquets to the sol- 
diers, who then took up the line of march, when all the scholars 
partook of a bountiful collation from the same table. 

The procession passed on through Cambridge and Winsor 
streets to Broadway, along which it passed under flags and 
streamers, bearing mottoes of welcome, and acknowledgments 
of thanks, passing houses appropriately decorated, — among 
which was a beautifully draped portrait of the martyr presi- 



J 



226 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

dent, — to Prospect Street. Here a line of flags and streamew 
was pendent, and a motto, " Death to Treason." 

On Prospect Street, at the residence of J. C. Wellington, 
Esq., sixteen beautiful young ladies, dressed alike, in white 
waists and black skirts, trimmed with national colors, emblepis 
of Love and Hope and Faith, were ranged. Each held in her 
hand a splendid bomjuet, which they presented to the veterans 
as they passed. The decorations in this vicinity were superb ; 
among which was an elegantly mounted full-length painting 
of the Father of his country. Among the mottoes here were, 
" You left your homes at the call of duty. You return victori- 
ous, the nation saved." "1776. Liberty. 1865. May we 
never forget your comrades who sacrificed their lives on the 
altar of liberty .*' 

From Prospect Street the procession moved on through 
Harvard Street to Quincy. Lines of flags and streamers 
crossed Harvard Street at difierent points ; nearly every house 
exhibited, by flags, drapery, or mottoes, the thanks and esteem 
of the residents. The Mayor's residence was very elegantly 
decorated, and bore the mottoes, " All hail to the Stars and 
Stripes." " Welcome I " " One Flag— One Country — One 
Constitution," — " Welcome Veterans." 

On the south side of Harvard Street, near the Mayor's 
residence, fifteen hundred scholars of the different schools of 
Old Cambridge and Cambridgeport were stationed to do their 
part in the outpouring of welcome home to the veterans. It 
was the most pleasing feature of the day. The hundreds of 
happy children, bearing flowers and flags, singing songs of wel- 
come home, waving their tiny flags, and swelling the pseans of 
praise and welcome to the returned braves, was indeed well 
calculated to please, and will doubtless remain vividly im- 
pressed on the memories of the beholders, until long after those 
little ones have become actively engaged in the manifold cares 
and duties, joys, sorrows, frivolities, and responsibilities of adult 
life. Bannerets were distributed through the ranks of the 
scholars bearing the inscriptions, " Cambridge High School " — 



THE PROCESSION, ETC. 227 

•'* Harvard Grammar School " — " Webster Grammar School " — 
" Allston Grammar School " — " Washington Grammar School " 
— " Shepard Granmiar School." As the veterans passed the 
scholars, they were made the recipients of so many flowers, 
that some difficulty was experienced as to the disposition they 
should make of them. 

The procession passed on through Harvard and Quincy 
Streets to Broadway; thence to North Avenue, and to Har- 
vard Square, amid the shouts of welcome from the hosts that 
were assembled in the front of ** Old Harvard." As the pro- 
cession passed from Broadway, through Harvard Square to 
Main Street, an opportunity was aiSbrded to take something 
like a full view of the whole. 

It was a magnificent scene as the procession passed from 
Broadway to North Avenue, and through the Square. The 
profusion of flowers among the military escort, and veterans, 
the gayly caparisoned horses of the marshal and his aids, the 
tall figure of Col. Richardson, mounted on a splendid charger 
bowing his acknowledgments on either hand, the proud bear- 
ing of the veterans, their torn and shot-riddled colors, the 
throng of cheering welcomes, the glittering polish of the steam 
fire apparatus, decorated with choice flowers, the uniform of 
the Fire Department, the larger part wearing scarlet jackets, 
the long line of Cavalcade, with their banners, — all com- 
bined to make a display worthy of transfer to canvas as a 
memorial of the happy day. Here were seen to great advan- 
tage the banners, mottoes, and inscriptions borne in the pro- 
cession. 

The procession continued through Main Street, toward the 
City Hall, passing many elegantly decorated residences, among 
which that of the Hon. J. M. S. Williams called forth praise 
from all observers. The City Hall was tastefully decorated 
with bunting. In the centre of the Main Street front was an 
architectural display, representing a Temple, consisting of an 
arch springing from pillars, on which were the figures of Vic- 
tory and Peace. In the arch was the motto ** Emancipation ;" 



228 THE STORY OF TUE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

and the inscription, "The sun will never rise over a nation 
more glorious than ours." The lower part of the temple was 
filled in with blue silk, on which, in letters of gold, was inscribed 
" One Country, one Constitution, one Destiny." Across the 
street a line of flags and streamers was suspended. 

The members of the City Government and invited guests 
here took up their places in the procession, which moved on 
toward the Universalist Church. At this point, clouds which 
for the past half hour had been gathering overhead, and which 
it had been hoped would pass over, and away, commenced to 
discharge their contents. Many of the spectators, who had 
thronged in the vicinity to witness the countermarch from 
Columbia to Magazine Street, sought refuge in the houses and 
stores, which were thrown open for shelter. With every min- 
ute the violence of the storm increased, drenching every one. 

The children, representing the States, were taken for shelter 
into Williams Hall, but not before some of them were wet 
through ; and thereby prevented from fulfilling their part of 
the programme of the exercises in the tent, — among which 
was to have been the delivery of beautiful address to the vet- 
erans by Miss Nettie Blake. Mrs. Peters, under whose direc- 
tion, and by whose patriotic labors, the design was so far carried 
out, was deprived of the reward of her labors in the successful 
consummation of her designs. She will doubtless feel compen- 
sated in part by the great applause her troops of pretty ones 
elicited on the route. 

Although the rain poured in torrents, the procession moved 
on, and countermarched at Columbia Street up Main Street. 
Through Magazine Street passed the procession, the rain still 
pouring in torrents, until the head of it reached the tent. The 
rain gradually ceased, and before the procession commenced to 
file into the tent, the sun came forth in its splendor. 

The pro'jcssion marched around the tent, and entered it at 
the north end. Here the selected scholars were seated on 
raised seats on the west side, wet through, for the tent had 
been a poor shelter from the heavy rain which had fallen. 



THE TROCESSION, ETC. 229 

As the veterans entered, they were received, as elsewhere, 
with shouts and songs of welcome. Plates were laid for four- 
teen hundred guests, and were speedily turned by that number. 
The tent, notwithstanding the rain, presented a cheerful 
aspect to the wet and hungry guests. A large tablet pre- 
sented on one side the list of twenty-two battles from Fort 
Sumter to Grettysburg. On the reverse, another list of twenty- 
two, from Fort Donaldson to Richmond. Along the sides, and 
at the end of the tent, were mottoes of welcome, and scrolls 
with the words, " Bisland " — " Cane River" — "Port Hud- 
son"—" Opequan "— " Winchester " — " Fisher's Hill," and 
" Cedar Creek," which recalled the deeds in arms of the gal- 
lant Thirty Eighth. 

In obedience to the order of the Mayor, the regi- 
ment made an attack on the refreshment tables, 
and achieved a complete victory. The assembly 
was then called to order, and an eloquent address 
of welcome made by Mayor Merrill, which was ap- 
propriately responded to by Lieut.-Col. Richardson. 
Addresses were also made by ex-Grovernor Wash- 
burn, ex-Mayor Russell, and Gen. Hincks. But 
the volunteers, many of whom lived at a distance, 
were anxious to reach the homes where their pres- 
ence was so eagerly awaited, and the majority 
took their leave as soon as the repast was ended. 
A display of fireworks in the evening closed the 
ceremonies of the day. 

All honor to Cambridge, who never forgot her 
soldiers in the field, and who welcomed them home 
20 



230 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

more warmly than she sent them away. Many 
whose citizenship is in other portions of the State 
will long remember her deeds, and rejoice at her 
prosperity. 

Warm welcomes were extended to the men from 
New Bedford, Lynn, Abington, and other towns, 
upon their arrival home. Company E was ten- 
dered a public reception by the city authorities 
of Lynn, but declined the honor. Abington gave 
a fine reception to all her returned soldiers, in- 
cluding those belonging to the Thirty Eighth. 

Four months have now passed since the mem- 
bers of the Thirty Eighth Massachusetts Regiment 
resumed their duties as citizens. They have set- 
tled in different portions of the country, and are 
engaged in all the various branches of civil in- 
dustry; but not one has brought discredit upon 
the fair fame of the regiment, or proved that he is 
less capable of being a good citizen because he 
became a soldier at the call of the country. 




.^ 



5tt ffilemoriam.. 




IN MEMORIAM. 



Beati)S Uom iSattle* 



BISLAND, LA. 



COMPANY A. 

Samuel Gault. 
Patrick J. Gill. 
Marcus 0. Sullivan. 

COMPANY B. 

Thomas Gibson. 
Francis C. Swift. 

COMPANY D. 

George H. Trow. 
James A. Lyon. 
Eugene Sanger. 
Lorenzo Tower. 



COMPANY E. 

Algernon S. Fisher. 

COMPANY a, 

John H. Crocker. 
Wilbur Simmons. 
Daniel F. Simmons. 

COMPANY L 

Thomas W. Hevey. 
John Mellen. 
Edward Shannon. 

COMPANY K. 

Manton Everett. 



PORT HUDSON, MAY 27. 

lleut.-colonel william l. rodman. 
company b. company f. 

John Ducy. John H. Tucker. 

James English. 

2:* 



i 



234 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 


PORT HUDSON, JUNE 14. 


OOMPANY A. 


COMPANY F. 


Thomas Cassidy. 


George R. Blake. 


George N. Allen. 


Joseph A. Morris. 


Chas. a. Carpenter. 


John M. Gilcreas. 


Edwin C. Proctor. 


company a 


OOMPANY 0. 


Frederic Holmes. 


Erastus 0. Prior. 


Seth Glass. 


COMPANY D. 


COMPANY B. 


William A. Lewis. 
Abel 0. Stetson. 
Israel U. Thrasher. 


Silas C. Kenney. 
Augustus E. Foster. 


COMPANY B. 


OOMPANY L 


Jambs C. McIntire. 


James Dooley. 
Albert T. B. Martin. 


COMPANY F. 




J. Frank Angell. 


COMPANY K. 


William L. Champney. 


Edward David. 


PORT HUDSON 

• 


DURING SIEQE. 


COMPANY B. 


COMPANY F. 


J. N. Fairfield. 


John H. Dame. 


COMPANY B. 


COMPANY L 


Alfred Bacheller. 


Charles. H. Thayer. 


OANE 


RIVER. 


COMPANY F. 


COMPANY L 


John Powers. 


Julius M. Lathrop. 




COMPANY K. 


COMPANY a. 


Charles G. Sherburne. 


Eelen Sampson. 


Levi C. Brooks. 



DEATHS FROM BATTLE. 



235 



RED RIVER. 

COMPANY A. 

William H. Lunt. 
OFEQUAN GREEK. 



COMPAIT? A. 

John Connors. 

OOMPANT B. 

Curtis Hobbs. 
Dennis White. 
Dennis B. Nash. 

company c. 

Joseph Ripley. 

company d. 

Andrew Stetson. 
G. Otis Hudson. 

COMPANY E. 
William H. Marston. 
Theodore Tucker. 



COMPANY B. 

Owen Hurley. 
LiNDLEY Kitchen. 

COMPANY F. 

George L. Burton. 

COMPANY a. 

George H. Pratt. 
John M. Whiting. 

COMPANY L 

Oliver R. Walton. 
George W. Hall. 

COMPANY Z. 

W. n. Dodge. 



FISHER'S HILL. 

COMPANY F. 

Martin G. Childs. 

GEDAR GREEK. 

COMPANY C. COMPANY F. 

William T. Ewell. Charles E. Neale. 

COMPANY H. 

JoaEPH H. Bly. 

COMPANY K. 

Atkins Brown. 



COMPANY D. 

Bel A Bates. 



236 



THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 



13eat)jg from 13igea!se< 

Sergt.-Major Walter W. Nourse. 

OOMPAWT A. 



Charles A. Howard. 
William P. Hadley. 
Augustus A. Thurston. 
JoHx W. Bertwell. 
Patrick Callahan. 



John A. Dodge. 
Elias W. Farmer. 
William Harlow. 
Thomas A. Roper. 
Orrin Seavey. 



Hiram L. Thurston. 



OOMPAWT B. 

Michael T. Crowning. Thomas Maroney. 



Charles I. Denton. 
James J. Gibson. 
John Harney. 
Joseph H. Hughes. 



Francis McQuade. 
Michael Murphy. 
Martin O'Brien. 
John Madden. 



John F. Steingardt, Jr. 
James A. Osborne. 
George E. Beal. 
Charles L. Baldwin. 
Allson Bicknell. 
Brine Downey. 
Calvin C. Ellis. 



OOMPAWT o. 

Andrew W. Fish. 
Morton E. Hill.. 
John Hudson. 
William W. Knowles. 
Joseph Merrows. 
Henry C. Millett. 
Nathan M. Stewart. 



Charles H. Walker. 



DEATHS FROM DISEASE. 



237 



OOMPAWT D. 

James A. Bowen. Myron Gould. 

Benjamin F. Durgin. 
Daniel P. Arnold. 



Stephen Bates. 
Bertrand Burgess. 
Charles E. Dyer. 
Joseph B. Fish. 



Andrew M. Hyland. 
James Kingman. 
Julius W. Monroe. 
William O'Brien. 
Silas N. Peterson. 
Bradford Sampson. 



Hiram F. Stevens. 



OOMPANT B. 



Lemuel J. Gove. 


Barnabas F. Clark. 


Benjamin F. Ingalls. 


Henry H. Fuller. 


Morris M. Keith. 


Samuel E. Heath. 


PtOBERT R. BeCKFORD. 


Samuel E. Luscomb. 


WOODBRIDGE BrYANT. 


William T. Phillips. 


James Birmingham. 


Henry K. White. 


Philo Carver. 


James Walter. 


Patrick O'Neill. 


OOMPANY r. 


H. Orlando Gale. 


Henry H. Keniston. 


Levi Langley. 


Warren Kenniston. 


William S. Copp. 


Charles Parker. 


Herman J. Clark. 


David Shattels. 


James H. Duhig. 


Abner Smith. 


James Golden. 


Alpheus Spaulding. 


John T. Gowen. 


WiLLLAM L. Stevens. 


Alfred Jennings. 


Charles White. 



238 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 


OOMPANY a. 


JosiAH E. Atwood. 


Charles J. Chandler. 


Francis B. Dorr. 


Edward E. Green. 


William A. Hathaway. 


Thomas Haley. 


Melzar a. Foster. 


Lemuel B. Faunce, Jr. 


D. Otis Totman. 


Warren S. Litchfield. 


John Breach. 


James McSherry. 


George E. Bates. 


William Perry. 


William Bailey. 


Otis Sears. 


Seth K. Bailey. 


Bennet Soule. 


OOMPANY H. 1 


Leander a. Tripp. 


James Holmes. 


Peter C. Brooks. 


Benjamin Jenks. 


George E. Hawes. 


Ezra S. Jones. 


Edwin R. Pool. 


Shubal Eldridge, Jr. 


Bartholomew Aiken. 


Charles G. Kimpton. 


William Bently. 


Alonzo W. Leach. 


HlUAM B. BONNEY. 


Horace E. Lewis. 


Samuel E. Dean. 


Walter T. Nye. 


Timothy F. Doty. 


Jason S. Peckham. 


John Dunlap. 


William Pittsley. ^ 


George W. Fish. 


Joshua Roach. 


Jehiel Fish. 


James Ryan. 


COMPANY I. 1 


Newell Barber. 


Edwin Hayward. 


James Farry. 


Gilbert H. Leland. 


Samuel Farry. 


George H. Stone. 


Otis Tucker. 



DEATHi^ FHOM DISEASE. 



OOMPAWT K. 



George T. Martin. 
James H. Pike. 
Edward L. Sargent. 
Joshua E. Bates. 
Robert Ames. 
Albert E. Bates. 
James W. Fish. 
Andrew W. Hatch. 

JOSIAH 



Wm. F. Harrington. 
George R. Josselyn. 
Benjamin Lynde. 
Leonard F. Miller. 
George E. Richardson. 
David Y. Mixer. 
Freeman A. Ramsdell. 
Arthur B. Shepard. 
Stoddard. 



ROLL OF THE REGIMENT. 



FIELD AI3^D STAFF. 



COLONELS. 



Timothy Ingraham, New Bedford. 

In command of 3d brigade, and afterward of Ist Brigade, 2d 
Division, 19th Corps, in winter and spring of 1868 ; on detached 
service as Provost Marshal in Washington, D. C., from Sept. 
1863, beinff detained in service after the muster-out of the regi- 
ment, and orevetted as Brigadier-Greneral. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. 

David K. Wardwell, Boston. 

Resigned Dec. 3, 1862 ; afterward in Veteran Reserve Corps. 
"VTOliam L. Rodman, New Bedford. 

Commissioned Lieut-Colonel, Dec. 4, 1862 ; killed at Port Hudson, 
May 27, 1868. 

James P. Richardson, Cambridge, 

Promoted Major, Dec. 4, 1862 ; Lieut-Colonel, July 13, 1868 ; in 
command of 3d Brigade, 2d Division, 19th Corps, Mav, 1864, 
Jan., Feb., and March, 1865; wounded at Opequan Creek, Sept. 
19, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 

MAJORS. 

David K. Wardwell, Boston. 

Promoted Lieut.-Colonel. 
William L. Rodman, New Bedford. 

Promoted Lieut-Colonel. 
James P. Richardson, Cambridge. 

Promoted Lieut.-Colonel. 
Charles F. Allen, Abington. 

Promoted Major, July 16,1868; Provost-Marshal at Baton Rouge, 
La., from October, 1863, to summer of 1864, and at Augusta, Ga.^ 
1865 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

(242) 



FIELD AND STAFF. 243 



-n SURGEONS 

Samuel C Hartwell, Soutlibridge. 

Resigned on account ot disability, March 2, 1864. 
Edwin F. Ward, Worcester. 

Promoted to Surgeon, April 27, 1864; in charge of hospital at Port 
Hudson, and at Winchester, Va. ; on detached service in Shenan- 
doah Valley, in spring and summer of 1864; mustered out, July, 
1865. 

ASSISTANT-SURGEONS. 

Edwin F. Ward, Worcester. 

Promoted to Surgeon. 
George F. Thompson, Belchertown. 

Discharged, Oct. 26, 1864, to accept commission as Surgeon in 11th 
Massachusetts Volunteers; afterward Surgeon in Frontier Cav- 
alry. 

ADJUTANTS. 

Frank W. Loring, Boston. 

On staff of Gen. Emory during campaign in Louisiana, 1863 ; af- 
terward on detached service; discharged from regiment, Ma^' 26, 
1864. 

Edward G. Dyke, Cambridge. 

Appointed Adjutant, from 2d Lieutenant, Company F, Feb. 8, 1868; 
Promoted 1st Lieutenant, March 4, 1868 ; discharged, to accept 
commission as Captain in U. S. Volunteer service, May 18, 1860; 
mustered out, 1866. 

Austin C. Wellington, Cambridge. 

Appointed Acting Adjutant from 1st Sergeant, Company F, August, 
1864. Sergeant Wellington was commissioned 2d Lieutenant, 
Nov. 21, 1863, 1st Lieutenant, Sept. 16,1864; and Adjutant, July, 
1865 ; but, the regiment being reduced in numbers below the 
standard required by the War Department for a full complement 
of officers, could not be mustered, and, after having participated 
in every engagement, was mustered out, July, 1866. 



QUARTERMASTERS. 

Elijah Swift, Falmouth. 

Detailed on brigade and division staffs, as A. A. Q. M., and absent 
from regiment from its arrival in^Gulf Department until its depar- 
ture from Savannah ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Nathan Russell, Jr., Cambridge. 

Promoted from Ist Lieutenant, July 1, 1864; wounded at Port 
Hudson, June 14, 3868; mustered out, July, 1866. 



244 STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STATU. 
SERGEANT-MAJORS. 

Timothy In^aliam, New Bedford. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Frederic D. Holmes, Plymouth. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 

Walter Nourse, Cambridge. 

Promoted from 1st Sergeant, Company F, Jan. 4, 1863; died at 
CarroUton, La., of typhoid fever, March 8, 1863. 

James T. Davis, Cambridge. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Albert F. Bullard, New Bedford. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
Horatio E. Macomber, Lynn. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant. 
John H. Butler, Cambridge. 

Promoted from Sergeant, Companv F, Nov. 15, 1863 ; wounded at 
Cane River; commissioned as 2a, and again as 1st Lieutenant, 
but not mustered ; mustered out, June, 1865. 

QUARTERMASTER-SERGEANTS. 

William Richardson, Newton. 

Discharged for disability, at Hampton, Va., Jan. 3, 1863. 

George H. Prior, Cambridge. 

Appointed from Company F, May 28, 1864; mustered out, July, 
1866. 

COMMISSARY-SERGEANTS. 

Israel B. Nelson, Cambridge. 
Discharged. 

James W. Davis, Falmouth. 

Appointed from Company H, Feb. 1, 1868 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

HOSPITAL-STEWARD. 

Amasa D. Ward, Worcester. 
Mustered out, June, 1865. 

PRINCIPAL MUSICIAN. 

Albert T. Finney, Plymouth. 

Promoted principal Musician, from Company G, Jan. 1, 1864; mus- 
tered out, July, 1865. 

Charles Monroe, Cambridge. 

Promoted principal Musician from Musician Company F, Jan. 1, 
1864 ; mustered out, June, 1865. 



ROLL OF COMPANY A. 245 



COMPANY A. 

CAPTAINS. 

J. P. Richardson, Cambridge. 
Promoted Major, Dec. 4, 1862. 

Samuel Gault, Boston. 

Promoted Captain, and transferred from Co. K, Dec. 4, 1862; killed 
at battle of Bisland, Apr. 13, 1863. 

William H. Jewell, Cambridge. 

Promoted 1st Lieutenant, Jan. 4,1863; Captain, March 8, 1863; 
injured by shell at battle of Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1863 ; mustered 
out, July, 1865. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

Arthur Hodges, Cambridge. 

Promoted Captain, April 14, 1868, and transferred to Co. K. 
Albert F. BuUard, New Bedford. 

Appointed from Sergeant-major; transferred to Co. E. 

SERGEANTS. 

William H. Whitney, Cambridge. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. March 4, 1863, and appointed to Co. £. 
George H. Copeland, Cambridge. 

F^moted Serjeant, Sept. 5, 1862; 1st Sergeant, March 6, 1863; 
wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1868; promoted 2d Lieutenant, 
July 16, 1863; 1st Lieut. May 1, 1864, and transferred to Co. K. 

Calvin C. Smith, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Opelousas, La., May 3, 1863. 
William P. Hadley, Cambridge. 

Died, at Brashear City, La., June 10, 1863. 
Charles A. Howard, Boston. 

Died, at CarroUton, La., of typhoid fever, Feb. 4, 1863. 
Isaac Fellows, Cambridge. 

Promoted Sergeant, March 5, 1863; 1st Sergeant, April 30, 1864; 
wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863, and at Opequan Creek, 
Sept. 19, 1864; discharged at Philadelphia, May 17, 1866. 

Samuel Sennot, Cambridge. 

Promoted to Corporal, Feb. 4, 1863; Sergeant, March 24, 1863; 
wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; discharged at Boston, 
April 26, 1864. 

John McClintock, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1863; Sergeant, March 26, 1864; Ist 
Serg., May 18, 1865; wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; 
rec. com. as licut., but not mustered ; mustered out, July, 1866. 

21* 



246 STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 



Joseph W. Smith, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1863 ; Sergeant, March 26, 1864; wound- 
ed at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Charles H. Titus, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Aug. 5, 1862; Sergeant, July 1, 1863; dis- 
char^d at Baton Rouj^e, La., Feb. 14, 1864, to accept a commis- 
sion m the Corps d'AMque. 

William A. Tarbell, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, March 24, 1863; Sergeant, May 1. 1864; on 
colors from Sept. 26, 1864; received commission as lieutenant, 
but not mustered ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Joseph B. Messer, Cambridge. 

Promoted to Corporal, Feb. 4, 1863; Sergeant, May 1, 1864,- 
wounded at Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1866; must out, July, 1866. 

George A. L. Snow, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, March 24, 1863; Sergeant, May 18, 1865; 
wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1866 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 

CORPORALS. 

George W. Belcher, Cambridge. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., July 4, 1868. 
William G. Boyson, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Navy, May 8, 1864; lost leg at capture of Mobile. 
Daniel R. Melcher, Cambridge. 

Transferred to 1st Louisiana Cavalry, Feb. 4, 1863 ; mustered out, 
July, 1866. 

Augustus A. Thurston, Cambridge. 

Died at General Hospital at Berwick City, La., May 22, 1863. 
Llewellyn P. Davis, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Aug. 25, 1662; discharged at Carrollton, La., 
Feb. 14, 1863. 

Thomas Cassidy, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, March 5, 1863; died at Baton Rouge, La., June 
28, 1863, of wounds received at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. 

Solomon N. Busnach, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1863; wounded at Port Hudson, June 
14, 1863; on colors from April, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 
John C. Lang, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal July 1, 1863; wounded at Port Hudson, June 
14, 1863 ; discharged at Boston, Nov. 12, 1863, for disability. 
John F. Mead, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Aug. 25, 1862; discharged at Baton Rouge, 
La., Oct. 14, 1863, to accept a commission in the Corps d'Afrique. 

James M. Mason, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Feb. 14, 1864; absent sick in hospital at Sa- 
vannah, Ga. ; returned home in Aug. 1866. 



ROLL OF COMPANY A. 247 

Ewen R. McPhereon, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Feb. 14, 1864; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Edward A. Hammond, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Feb. 14, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Henry H. Abbott, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1864 ; wounded at Bisland, April 18, 
1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Charles H. Laws, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1864; taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, 
Oct 19, 1864; paroled, and mustered out, July, 1865. 

David M. Smith, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, May If 1864; absent sick at Kewbem, N. C; 
returned home in September, 1865. 

Henry L. Ward, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1864 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 

MUSICIAN. 

George H. Merrill, Cambridge. 
Discharged at New Orleans, La. 

WAGONER. 

Elias W. Farmer, Cambridge. 

Died at Greneral Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., Oct. 31, 1863. 

PRIVATES. 

Greorge N. Allen, Cambridge. 

Died at Theatre Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 21, 1863. 
Henry C. Bandell, Cambridge. 

Lost left arm at battle of Bisland, La., April 13, 1868 ; discharge 
at New Orleans, La., Aug. 5, 1868. 

Patrick Brady, Cambridge. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., Aug. 8, 1863. 
John D. Bertwell, Cambridge. 

Died at General Hospital, Berwick City, La. 
William L. Baker, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
George F. Bicknell, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
John H. Childs, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Lewis C. Clark, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles A. Carpenter, Cambridge. 

Killed at Port Hudson, La. June 14, 1868. 



248 STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Patrick Callahan, Cambridge. 

Died at Brasbear City, La., May 26, 1868. 
John Connors, Cambridge. 

Killed at battle of Winchester, Ya., Sept. 19, 1864. 
Bernard Casey, Cambridge. 

Mastered out, July, 1865. 
Phillip Cartwright, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Samuel Cartwright, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baltimore, Md., Feb. 14, 1868. 
Samuel Dias, Cambridge. 

Absent, sick in Mass. 
John P. Davidson, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Boston, Nov. 17, 1863. 
Frank S. Dame, Cambridge. 

On detached service in commissary department from arrival at 
Baltimore until June, 1865 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 

John A. Dodge, Cambridge. 

Died at New Orleans, La., April 17, 1863. 
William Friend, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1868 ; mastered out, July, 1865. 
John Gunnulson, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James M. Goodwillie, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Washington, D. C, Oct 27, 1862. 
Patrick J. Gill, Cambridge. 

Killed at Battle of Bisland, La. 
Jeremiah Grehan, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Thomas Gamble, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866; in commissary department from arrival 
of regiment in Baltimore until mustered out, July, 1865. 

John Gerry, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; mustered out, July 1866. 
James G. Hunt, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Boston, May 29, 1868. 
Benjamin F. Hastings, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1868; discharged at 
Boston, Sept. 9, 1868. 

Warren A. Hersey, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
William Harlow, Cambridge. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., of chronic diarrhoea, Feb. 6, 1864. 



ROLL OF COMPANY A. 249 

William C. Jones, Cambridge. 

Discharged at New Orleans, July 4, 1868. 
Samuel R. Knights, Cambridge. 

Discharged at CarroUton, La., Feb. 6, 1862; resnlt of sprain. 
John Kelley, Cambridge. 

Mastered out, July 1865. 
William G. Laws, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James M. Lewis, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Vet Res. Corps, April 22, 1864. 
William H, Lunt, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1868 ; killed by Guerillas while 
on passage up Red River, La., April 18, 1864. 

John Menix, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Ist Louisiana Cavalry, Feb. 4, 1868; re-transferred 
to regiment, Aug. 23, 1864; not present at muster out. 

Robert Milligan, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baltimore, Md., Nov. 19, 1862. 
William A. May, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Fortress Monroe, Ya., Jan. 7, 1868. 
Charles F. Moody, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; discharged, May 22, 1866. 
William N. Megroth, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
John F. Newell, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Greorge H. Noyes, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Edwin C. Proctor, Cambridge. 

Died at New Orleans, La., July 27, 1868, of wounds, received at 
Port Hudson, June 14, 1863. 

Frank F. PuUen, Cambridge. 

Transferred to 8d Mass. Cavahy, July 4, 1863. 
John Peters, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Boston, July 4, 1863. 
Alvin F. Prescott, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Austin Qualey, Cambridge. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., July 4, 1863. 
James A. Reid, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Convalescent Camp, near Washington, D. C, Feb. 
8, 1863. 

Thomas H. Roper, Cambridge. 

Died at Greneral Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., April 18, 1868. 



250 STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Greorge W. Stafford, Cambridge. 

Taken prisoner at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; paroled, mus- 
tered out, July, 1865. 

Bartholomew Sullivan, Cambridge. 

John Sullivan, Cambridge; 

Discharged at Baton Rouge, La., June 30, 1863; dropsy. 
Marcus O. Sullivan, Cambridge, 

Died at Brashear City, La., May 7, 1863, of wounds, received in 
battle of Bisland, La., April 13, 1863. 

Orrin Seavey, Cambridge. 

Died at Brashear City, La., June 1, 1868. 
Hiram L. Thurston, Cambridge. 

Died at General Hospital at Washington, D. C, Aug. 19, 1864. 

George. T. Tucker, Cambridge. 

Acting Hospital Steward; discharged at New Orleans, La., July 17, 
1863; died at New Orleans, La., Aug. 13, 1863. 

John Talbot, Cambridge. 

Taken prisoner at Opequan Creek, Sept 19, 1864; died in Salisbury . 
Charies E. Warren, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863 ; discharged, May 22, 1865. 
Emmett Weeks, Cambridge. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., July 1, 1863. 
John H. Walker, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
James C. Wilder, Cambridge. 

Acting Hospital Steward; Mail Agent and Mail Messenger; mus- 
tered out, July, 1866. 

Charles D. Whitney, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Boston, July 19, 1864. 
Joseph W. Welch, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Washington, D. C., Sept. 9, 1864. 
John E. William, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 23, 1863. 
Richard H. Young, Cambridge. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., July 4, 1864. 
Charies W. Damon, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Navy, May 8, 1864. 

John Sanborn, Boston. 

Joined, Feb. 10, 1866; transferred to 26th Mass., June 25, 1866. 
Dura Wadsworth, Gardner, Mass. 

Joined, Aug. 20, 1864; transferred to 26th Mass., June 25, 1865. 
Joshua Jones (colored under-cook). Baton Bouge, La. 

Transferred to 26th Mass., June 26, 1865. 



ROLL OF COMPANY B. 251 



OOMPAMTT B. 



CAPTAIN. 

J. Henry Wyman, Cambridge. 

Injured bv shell at Port Hudson, June 14, 1868; discharged for 
disability, Oct. 26, 1864. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

Frank N. Scott, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability, Aug. 16, 1864. 
James N. Bennett,Cambridge. 

Promoted 1st Lieutenant, April 17, 1868; Captain, Oct. 14, 1868; 
transferred to Co. C; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles Mason, Plymouth. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant, March 1,1868; commissioned as 1st Lieu- 
tenant, but not mustered; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Albert Jackson, Cambridge. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant, April 17, 1868; wounded at Port Hudson, 
June 14, 1863; resigned, March, 1864. 

SERGEANTS. 

James Chapman, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability. May 4, 1868. 
B. Richard Edgeworth, Cambridge. 

Absent sick at muster out of regmient. 
Nathaniel Wentworth, Cambridge. 

Promoted Ist Sergeant, July 1, 1863; received commission, but not 
mustered; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Henry C. Hobbs, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864; received commission, 
but not mustered; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Thomas Mclntire, Jr., Cambridge. 

Promoted Serj^eant, July, 1863 ; woonded at Opequan Creek, Sept. 
19, 1864; discharged. 

Curtis Hobbs, Cambridge. 

' Promoted Sergeant, Sept. 1, 1868 ; killed at Opequan Creek, Sept. 
19, 1864. 

Patrick Murphy, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, March 15, 1868; Sergeant, March 1, 1866; 
mustered out, July, 1865. 

W^illiam Chapman, Jr., Cambridge. 
Promoted Sergeant, March 1, 1865; mustered out, July, 1865. 



252 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 



Andrew Jackson, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1868; Sergeant, March 1, 1866; mus- 
tered out, July, 1865. 

Nathaniel P. Low^ Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Sept. 1, 1862; Sergeant, July 1, 1868; dis- 
charged, Aug. 4, 1868. 

CORPORALS. 

Charles A. Austin, Cambridge. 

Detailed at Gallop's Island, from Aug. 1863 ; discharged, June, 1865. 
Charies D. Challies, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 24, 1868. 
Chester M. Davis, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1868; discharged at Boston for 
disability. Sept 8, 1868. 

Emerson Butler, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Nov. 19, 1868; discharged from hospital at 
Baltimore, Md., May 3, 1868. 

Thomas Briny, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, March 1, 1865 ; sick in hospital at muster out 
of regiment; returned home afterward. 

James Stinson, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
William P. Davis, Cambridge. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., May 10, 1863, for disability. 
James Cook, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, March 1, 1866; mustered out, July, 1866. 
James O'Brien, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, March 1, 1865 ; mustered out, July, 1866 ; re- 
enlisted in Regular Army. 

Thomas Gulliver, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, May 8, 1865; mustered out, July, 1865. 

WAGONER. 

Moses Ricker, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baton Rouge, La., Sept. 20, 1868, for disability. 

PRIVATES. 

James Anderson, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Boston, May, 1864, for disability. 
John H. Banfield, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Augusta, Me., Nov. 14, 1868, for disability. 
Antro Baderschneider, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 



ROLL OF C03IPANT B. 253 

Melville C. Beedle, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Hilton Head, June 8, 1866, for disability. 
Edwin A. Black, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability, 1865. 
Terence Conlan, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Navy, Aug. 1, 1864. 
Terence Conlan, 2d, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baltimore, Md., Dec. 27, 1862. 
Dixwell H. Clark, Cambridj^e. 

Discharged at Baltimore, Md., Nov. 28, 1862. 
Michael T. Croning, Cambridge. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek ; died in Salisbury, N.C., Dec. 6, 1864. 
Charies T. Denton, Cambridge. 

Died in hospital at Brashear City, May 31, 1863. 
William Dearing, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability at New Orleans, La., F«b. 28, 1868. 
Florence Driscoll, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
John Donahue, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Navy, Aug. 1, 1864. 
Michael Cullerton, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Navy, Aug. 1, 1864. 
John Ducy, Cambridge. 

Killed at Port Hudson, May 27, 1868. 
J. P. Doyle, Cambridge. 

Discfalarged at New Orleans, La., 1863. 
James English, Cambridge, 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., 1863, of wounds received at Port 

Hudson, May 27, 1863. 

James M. Fairfield, Cambridge. 

Killed at Port Hudson, June 2, 1868. 
Lawrence Fallon, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Patrick Gallagher, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
George O. Grant, Cambridge. 

•fiansferred to 1st Louisiana Cavalry, Feb. 4, 1868. 
Hugh Gray, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Eben T. Gulliver, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability, in Louisiana, March 27, 1863. 
James J. Gibson, Cambridge. 

Died in hospital at Baton Kouge, La., March 21, 1868. 

22 



254 THE STORY OP THE TUIRTT EIGHTH. 

Thomas Gibson, Cambridge. 

Killed at Bisland, AprU 13, 1868. 

William Goggin, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Michael A. Gready, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; discharged for disability, 
at Boston, Aug. 18, 1868. 

William Hoylet, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Navy, Aug. 1, 1864. 
Philip Hardenburg, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
John Harney, Cambridge. 

Died at New Orleans, La., June 4, 1863. 
Michael Harney, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability, Louisiana, May 13, 1868. 
Timothy D. Hill, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Louisiana, Aug. 24, 1863. 
Joseph H. Hughes, Cambridge. 

Died at New Orlean,s La., May 21, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 
Martin Innis, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Harney H. Johnson, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability. May, 1864. 
Charies Larrabee, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Navy, July 1, 1864. 
Matthew Manning, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864 ; mustered out. July, 
1865. 

Thomas Maroney, Cambridge. 

Died, May 20, 1863, at Ship Island. 
Daniel J. Madden, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability, Sept. 2, 1868. 
John Madden, Cambridge. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., July, 1863, of wounds received at Port 
Hudson, May 27, 1863. 

Patrick McAleer, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Hampton, Ya., for disability, March 8, 1863. 
Owen McGuire, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
John McQuade, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Navy, Aug. 1, 1864. 
Francis McQuade, Cambridge. 

Died on board transport on Mississippi River, while going home on 
furlough. 



ROLL OF COMPANY B. 255 

Terence Monahan, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability, Sept. 28, 1868. 
Thomas McGovem, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; mustered out, July, 
1865. 

Michael Murphy, Cambridge. 

Died at Brashear City, May 26, 1868. 
Israel P. Nelson, Cambridge. 

Discharged for disability at Louisiana, Feb. 10, 1868. 
Dennis B. Nash, Cambridge. 

Died of wounds received at Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864. 
George Nixon, Cambridge. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; sick in hospital at 
Readville, Mass., at muster out of regiment. 

Martin O'Brien, Cambridge. 

Died in hospital at Baton Rouge, La., March 6, 1863. 

Michael O'Brien, Cambridge. 
Mustered out, July, 1866. 

John H. Ready, Cambridge. 

Shot at Savannah while on duty, by provost guard, 1866. 

Dwight C. Robbins, Cambridge. , 

Mustered out, June, 1865. 
John Scott, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; discharged for dis- 
ability, July ^2, 1864. 

Francis C. Swift, Cambridge. 

Died at Brashear City of wounds received at Bisland, April 13, 
1868. 

Patrick Sweeny, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Bisland; discharged at New Orleans, La., for dis- 
ability. 

Michael Smith, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, May 27 ; discharged at Louisiana. 

Timothy Twohig, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; transferred to Veteran 
Reserve Corps, April 30, 1864. 

David Tobin, Cambridge. 
Mustered out, July, 1865. 

Dennis White, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, May 27, 1868; died at Winchester, Va., 
Sept. 21, of wounds received at Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864. 

Joseph L. White, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 30, 1864. 
Asa Worcester, Cambridge. 

Sick in hospital at Washington, 1866; mustered out, July, 1865. 



256 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Edward Conlan, Cambridge. 

Enlisted, Dec. 15, 1863; promoted Corporal, March 1, 1866; trans- 
ferred to Twenty Sixth Massachusetts, June, 1866. 

Timothy Crowley, Cambridge. 

Enlisted, Dec. 15, 1868; transferred to 26th Mass., June, 1865. 
Thomas Dempsey, Cambridge. 

Enlisted, Jan. 18, 1864; transferred to 26th Mass. June, 1865. 
Michael M. Egan, Cambridge. 

Enlisted, Jan. 30, 1864; transferred to 26th Mass., June, 1866. 
Mark Fallon, Cambridge. 

Enlisted, Dec. 10, 1863 ; transferred to 26th Mass., June, 1865. 
James Hogan, Cambiidge. 

Enlisted, Dec. 10, 1868 ; transferred to 26th Mass., June, 1866. 
John Johnson, Boston. 

Enlisted, Jan. 9, 1865 ; transferred to 26th Mass., June, 1865. 
Patrick Riley, Cambridge. 

Enlisted, Nov. 30, 1863; transferred to 26th Mass., June, 1866. 

COLORED COOKS. 

Robert H. Sands, Baton Rouge. 

Enlisted Nov. 15, 1863 ; transferred to 26th Mass., June, 1866. 

Paul Gibbs, Baton Rouge. 

Enlisted, Nov. 15, 1868; transferred to 26th Mass., June, 1866. 



OOMFAN7 O. 



CAPTAINS. 



Charles F. Allen, Abington. 

Promoted Major, July 16, 1868. 
George N. Bennett, Cambridge. 

Promoted Ist Lieutenant, and appointed to Co. C, April 18, 1863; 
promoted Captain, Oct. 14, 1863 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

Timothy Reed, Abington. 

Promoted Captain, and appointed to CJo. D, Nov. 1, 1862. 
Albert Mason, Plymouth. 

Promoted 1st Lieut., and appointed to Co. C, Oct. 14, 1863; trans- 
ferred to Co. G, April 23, 1863 ; re-transferred to Co. C, Jan. 7, 
1864; mustered out, May 23,1864, to accept a commission as 
A. Q. M. U. S. Volunteers. » 



ROLL OP COMPANY C. 257 

William H. Whitney, Cambridge. 

Promoted Ist Lieutenant, and appointed to Co. C, Oct. 14, 1868; 
transferred to Co. G, Jan. 7, 1864. 

Francis A. Nash, Abington. 

Promoted 1st Lieutenant, and appointed to Co. F, March 3, 1863. 
Jerome Washburn, Plymouth. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant, and appointed to Co. C, March 8, 1863; 
resigned, Jan. 24, 1864. 

SERGEANTS. 

James E. Bates, Abington. 

Keceived commission as lieutenant, but not mustered; mustered out, 
July, 1865. 

Joseph W. Caton, Abington. 

Taken prisoner at Opequau Creek, Sept. 19, 1864; paroled; received 
commission as lieutenant, but not mustered; mustered out, July, 
1865. 

Ebenezer G. Tuttle, Abington. 

Discharged at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., July 9, 1863, for 
disability. 

William T. Ewell, Abington. 

Died, Oct. 27, 1864, of wounds, received in action at Cedar Creek, 
Oct. 19, 1864. 

John F. Steingardt, Jr., East Bridge water. 

Promoted bergeant, March 10, 1863 ; died, Sept. 2, 1863, at Baton 
Rouge, La., of chronic diarrhoea. 

Henry W. Powers, Abington. 

Promoted Sergeant, July 17, 1863; wounded in action at Cedar 
Creek, Va., Oct. 1864;' mustered out, July, 1865. 

John E. Bickford, Abington. 

Promoted Sergeant, Jan. 1, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Thomas F. Whiting, Abington. 

Promoted Corporal, March 10. 1863 ; wounded at Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, 1863; Sergeant, May 1, 1865; mustered out, July, 1865. 

CORPORALS. 

Nathaniel O. Holbrook, Abington. 

Discharged at University Hospital, New Orleans, La., June 7, 1863, 
for disability. 

Erastus O. Prior, Abington. 

Died, June 19, 1863j at University Hospital, New Orleans, La., of 
wounds, received m action, June* 14, 1863, at Port Hudson. 

Ephraim T. Cole, Abington. 

Discharged, July 2, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., for 
disability. 

22* 



258 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Lysander Teague, Abington. 

Discharged, Dec. 27, 1862, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., for disability. 

William H. Fullerton, Bridgewater. " 

Absent sick since April 20, 1864, in U. S. General Hospital, Read- 
ville, Mass. 

Edward C. Alden, Abington. 

Promoted Corporal, March 10, 1863 ; on detached service at Boston 
Harbor. 

Charles D. Nash, Abington. 

Promoted Corporal, July 2, 1863 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 
James A. Osborne, Abington. 

Promoted Corporal, Jan. 1, 1864; taken prisoner, Oct. 19, 1864; 
died, Jan. 23, 1865, at Salisbury, N. C, of diarrhoea. 

Edwin R. Robbins, Abington. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June, 14, 1868; promoted Corporal, 
July 2, 1863; wounded in action at Winchester, Va., Sept 19, 
1864; absent sick at muster out of regiment. 

Edwin Ripley, Abington. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; promoted Corporal, 
July 1, 1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Miles Sampson, Abin^n. 

Promoted Corporal, July 2, 1868; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Henry W. Peirce, Abington. 

Promoted Corporal, Sept. 1, 1864 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

MUSICIANS. 

John A. Healey, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
William H. Bicknell, Abington. 

Discharged, March 4, 1864, at Baton Rouge, La. 

WAGONER. 

Samuel H. McKenny, Abington. 

Discharged, Nov. 18, 1863, at Boston, for disability. 

PRIVATES. 

Calvin W. Allen, Abington. 

Discharged, June, 7, 1863, at University Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. , 

David B. Bates, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles Bates, Abington. 

Wounded at Bisland, April 13, 1863 ; transferred to Veteran Reserve 
Corpa, April 30, 1864. 



ROLL OF COMPANY C. 259 

Edwin Bates, Abington. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864 ; absent sick in 
Hospital, Alexandria, Va., at muster out of regiment. 

Benjamin K. Barrett, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Daniel W. Beal, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
George E. Beal, Abington. 

Died, Feb. 16, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., ot 
typhoid fever. 

David F. Barry, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James Bailey, Abington. 

Wounded in action, Sept. 19, 1864, at Winchester, Va. ; mustered 
out. May 26, 1865. 

Ira B. Baldwin, Abington. 

Wounded in action at Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 22, 1864; mustered 
out, July, 1865. 

Charles L. Baldwin, Abington. 

Died, May 4, 1868, at Brashear City, La., of chronic diarrhoea. 
Alison Bicknell, Abington. 

Died, April 14, 1868, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., of 
chronic diarrhoea. 

Charles Bushnell, Abington. 

Discharged, Feb. 16, 1863, at Fairfax Seminary Hospital, Alexan- 
dria, Va., for disability. 

Josiah G. Cook, Abington. 

Sick in U. S. Gren. Hospital at Smithville, N. C, at muster out 
of regiment. 

James H. Corthell, Swanzey. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Daniel M. Corthell, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Frank Carney, Abington. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 31, 1864. 
Samuel G. Capen, Abington. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 81, 1864. 
Edward L. Dyer, Abington. 

Discharged, July 9, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 

Brine Downey, Abington. 

Died, June 21, 1863, at Arsenal Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., of 
typhoid fever. 

Frederick Donovan, Abington. 

Discharged, Oct 19, 1868, at New Orleans, La., for disability. 



260 THE STORY OF TH>£ THIRTY EIGHTH. 

James H. Edson, Abington. 

Discharj^ed Nov. 10, 1862, at Convalescent Camp, Fort McHenry, 
Baltimore, Md., for disability. 

Jason Ellis, Abington. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; mustered jut, 
July, 1865. 

Calvin C. Ellis, Abington. 

Died, June 23, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., of 
chronic diarrhoea. 

George E lines, Abington. 

Transferred to Louisiana Cavalry; re-transferred to Co. C; mus- 
tered out, July, 1865. 

James Finnigan, Abington. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 30, 1864. 
Charles H. French, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Hiram Foster, Abington. 

Discharged, Aug. 22, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Andrew W. Fish, Abington. 

Died, August 3, 1863, at Arsenal Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., of 
chronic diarrhoea. 

Andrew H. Gurney, Abington. 

Discharged, Aug. 22, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Morton E. Hill, Abington. 

Died, April 13, 1863, at University Hospital, New Orleans, La., of 
pneumonia. 

John Hudson, Abington. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La, June 14, 1863; died, Nov. 3, 1863, 
at East Bridgewater, Mass., of chronic diarrhoea. 

Nathaniel T. Howland, Abington. 

Discharged, Jan. 23. 1865, at Judiciary Square Hospital, D. C, for 
disability, caused by wounds received April 13 1864. 

George H. Howe, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Isaac Hopkins, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
William W. Knowles, Abington. 

Died, June 3, 1863, at University Hospital, New Orleans, La., of 
chronic diarrhoea. 

George B. Lovewell, Abington. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; paroled; mas- 
tered out, July, 1865. 

Seth W. Mitchell, Abington. 

Discharged, Jan. 13, 1863, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Baltimore, 
Md., for disability 



ROLL OP COMPANY C. 261 

Joseph Merrows, Abington. 

Died, Jan. 26, 1863, at Carrollton, La., of typhoid fever. 
George W. Manchester, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Henry C. Millett, Abington. 

Died, July 8, 1863, at Church Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., of 
typho malarial fever. 

Elijah G. Morris, Abington. 

Di«»harged, June 14, 1868, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 

Dennis McGill, Abington. 

Transferred to Louisiana Cavalry, Feb. 3, 1868. 
Edward E. Nash, Abington. 

Discharged, June 20, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 

Harrison O. F. Newton, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Joseph E. Prouty, Hanson. 

Discharged, Aug. 22, 1863, at Raton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Perrigan W. Pool, Abington. 

Wounded in action at Cedar Creek, Vn., Oct. 19, 1864; in U. S. 
Gen. Hospital, Readville, Mass., at muster out of regiment. 

Daniel W. Powers, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Jonathan Perry, Abington. 

Discharged, Nov. 15, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 

Joshua L. Perkins, Abington. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14. 1863; taken prisoner at 
Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864; mustered out previous to regiment. 

David F. Phillips, Abington. 

Discharged, Nov. 3, 1863, at Boston, Mass., for disability. 

Joseph W. Randall, Abington. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; sick in U. S. Gren. 
Hospital, Readville, Mass., at muster out of regiment. 

Isaac Ramsdell, Hanson. 

Discharged, Nov. 29, 1862, at Boston, Mass., for disability. 
Philemon W. Ramsdell, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 

Alvin Rice, Abington. 

Discharged, Jan. 18, 1863, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., for disability. 

Joseph Ripley, Abington. 

Died, Oct. 9,, 1864, at Winchester, Va , of wounds received in ac*' 
Sept. 19, 1864. 



262 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

John Sampson, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Benjamin Steingardt, Abington. 

Discharged, Nov. 17, 1863, at Boston, Mass., for disability. 
Daniel N. E. Steingardt, Bridgewater. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Joseph A. Steingardt, E. Bridgewater. 

Discharged, Aug. 22, 1868, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Gibbens Sharp, Easton. 

Lost leg at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864 ; discharged, March 28, 
1865, at Broad and Cherry Street Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Simeon Sharpe, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Henry A. Soper, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Nathan M. Stewart, Abington. 

Died, August 7, 1864, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., of 
chronic diarrhoea. 

Levi A. Swain, Abington. 

Discharged, Dec. 24, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
James N. Sullivan, Abington. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Thomas H. Thorpe, Abington, 

Discharged, Feb. 14, 1868, at Carrollton, La., for disability. 
Thomas Taylor, Boston. 

Discharged, June 18, 1864, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Peter Talbot, Abington. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. 16, 1864. 
Newton Townsend, Abington. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; mustered out, 
July, 1865. 

Joseph Trust, Abington. 
Mustered out, July, 1865. 

James H. Willey, Abington. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 30, 1864. 
Charles H. Walker, Abington. 

Died, Aug. 21, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., of chronic diarrhoea. 
Ezra E. Washburn, Jr., Abington. 

Discharged, Nov. 23, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., to accept a com- 
mission in Corps d'Airique. 

James Buchanan, Beverly. 

Enlisted while regiment was in service; transferred to 26th Mas<^a- 
chusetts, June 25, 1865. 



ROLL OP COMPANY I>. KbJJ 

James L. House, Boston. 

Enlisted while regiment was in service; transferred to 2$th Massa- 
chusetts, Jane 26, lb6o. 

COLORED UNDER-COOKS. 

Edward Nugent, Baton Rouge, La. 

Killed, May 3, 1864, on Red River, at capture of steamer ** Citv 
Belle." 

Reuben Nugent, Baton Rouge, La. 

Transferred to 26th Massachusetts, June 26, 1866. 



COMPANY D. 

CAPTAINS. 

Timothy Reed, Abington, 

Promoted Captain, and transferred from Co. C, Nov. 1, 1862; dis- 
charged March 4, 1868. 

Charles C. Howland, New Bedford. 

Promoted 1st Lieutenant, March 8, 1863; promoted Captain, and 
transferred from Company H, Oct. 14, 1863; received sun-stroke 
on march to Clinton, June, 1863 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

Albert Mason, Plymouth. 

Promoted Ist Lieutenant, and appointed to Company C, Nov. 1, 
1862 ; mustered out, May 23, 1864, to accept Commission as A. Q. 
M. U. S. Vols. 

George B. Russell, PljTnouth. 

Promoted 1st Lieutenant, Dec. 4, 1862; transferred from Co. 6 to Co. 
D, March 4, 1863; promoted Captain and appointed to Co. G, 
Nov. 1, 1863; wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. 

Cephas Washburn, Kingston. 

Resigned March 4, 1863, on account of disability. 
Timothy Ingraham, Jr., New Bedford. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant Co. D, Nov. 1, 1862; transferred to Co. 
H., April 30, 1863; wounded by guerillas on passage up Red 
River, April 13, 1864; on detached service in Washington at 
muster out of regiment. 

Morton D. Mitchell, E. Bridgewater. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant Co. L, Nov. 1, 1862 ; resignation accepted 
March 23, 1863; died on passage home. 

Charles Mason, Plymouth. 

Promnred 2d Lieutenant, March 1,1863; commissioned as 1st Lieu- 
tenant, but not mustered ; mustered out, July, 1866. 



2G4 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 



SERGEANTS. 

Francis C. Hill, Kingston. 

DiAcharged, Nov. 17, 1863, at Boston, for disability. 
Charles Everson, Kingston. 

Discharged, Aug. 11, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La.. 
for disability. 

Solomon E. Faunce, PljTnouth. 

Discharged, Jan. 16, 1863, at Stewart's Hospital, Baltimore, Md., 
fur disability. 

James A. Bowen, PljTnouth. 

Promoted Sergeant, Jan. 15, 1863; 1st Sergeant, Nov. 17, 1868; 
died, June 7, 1864, at Morganza, La., of fever. 

Ajidrew J. Stetson, E. Bridgewater. 

Promoted Sergeant, Nov. 1, 1862; killed in action, Sept. 19, 1864, 
at Winchester, Va. ; wounded at Port Hudson, La., May 27, 1863.* 

Joseph Smith, Hanson. 

Promoted Sergeant, Feb. 27, 1863; discharged, March 9, 1864, at 
Baton Rouge, La., to accept a commission m Corps d'Afrique. 

Arthur S. Byrnes, Bridgewater. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct. 8, 1862; Sergeant, Sept. 1, 1863; 1st Ser- 
geant, June 7, 1864; received a commission but not mustered; 
mustered out, July, 1865. 

Billings Merritt, Hingham. 

Promoted Corporal, Feb. 27, 1863; Sergeant, Nov. 17, 1863; mus- 
tered out, July, 1865. 

James L. Keith, Bridgewater. 

Promoted Corporal, Sept. 1, 1863; Sergeant, March 4, 1864; mus- 
tered out, July, 1866. 

Leonard F. Gammons, E. Bridgewater. 

Promoted Corporal, Nov. 1, 1863; Sergeant, June 7, 1864; mus- 
tered out, July, 1865. 

Alonzo L. Holmes, Bridgewater. 

Promoted Corporal, Sept. 1, 1863; on colors; Sergeant, June 1, 
1865; mustered out, July, 1865. 

CORPORALS. 

Edmund W. Nutter, E. Bridgewater. 

Discharged, May 26, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 

George L. Faxon, E. Bridgewater. 

Discharged, Jan. 14, 1864, at New Orleans, La., to accept a commis- 
sion in the U. S. C. T. 

Albert Harden, Bridgewater. 

Discharged at Mower Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., May 25, 1865, for 
disability. 



ROLL OF COMPANY D. 2fi5 

Bernard T. Quinn, Plymouth. 

Transferred to Veteran Keserve Corps, Jan. .18, 1865. 
Seth P. Gurney, E. Biidgewater. 

Promoted Corpojal, Oct. ±2, 1«62; discharged at Hilton Head, June 
8, 1805, lor disability. 
George H. Trow, E. Bridgewater. 

Promoted Corporal, Nov. 1, 1862; killed in action, April 13, 1803, 
at Bislaud, La. 

Benjamin F. Durgin, Plymouth. 

Promoted Corporal, Dec. 1862; died in Convalescent Hospital, 
Baton Kouge, Aug. 8, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 

Patrick Smith, Kingston. 

Promoted Corporal, April 13, 1863; wounded at Port Hudson, La., 
June 4; discharged, Oct. 22, 1863, at Boston, for disability. 

Nahum F. Harden, E. Bridgewater. 

Promoted Corporal, Nov. 17, 1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 

John Studley, Cohasset. 

Promoted Corporal, March 4, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 
James E. Barrows, Plymouth. 

Promoted Corporal, June 7, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Thomas O. Hayden, Cohasset. 

Promoted Corporal, June 1, 1865; wounded at, Opequan Creek, 
Sept. ly, 1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Frank G. Parker, E. Bridgewater. 

Promoted Corporal, June 1, 1865; mustered out, July, 1866. 

MUSICIANS. 

Francis Bates, Plymouth. 

Discharged, Jan. 30, 1864, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Thomas Gallagher, Plymouth. 

Discharged, Sept. 2, 1863, at Boston, for disability. 



son. 

'Wt 

ionpet 
), atBat( 



PRIVATES. 

John C. Ames, Hanson 
Mustered out, July,f 

Daniel P. Arnold, ColBfeet. 

Died, Oct. 31, 1863, atBaton Rouge, La., of chronic diarrhoea. 
Edward H. Arnold, Cohasset. 

Discharged, Nov. 28, 1862, at Stewart's Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
for disability. 

George Arnold, Cohasset. 

Discharged, May 20, 1863, at Fortress Monroe, Va., for disability. 
Alfred Barrows, Pembroke. 

Discharged, Feb. 7, 1864, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 



266 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Bcla Bates, Cohaaset 

Missing in action, Oct 19, 1864, at Cedar Creek; probably killed. 
Gustavus D. Bates, Plymouth. 

Discharged, Aug. 5, 1863, at University Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 

Stephen Bates, Hanson. 

Died, May 21, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., of chronic diarrhoea. 
Jacob D. Bonney, E. Bridgewater. 

Discharged, Feb. 14, 1865, at Satterlee Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., 
for disability. 

Tchabod Bosworth, Hanson. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1868; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Henry Brown, Kingston. 

Discharged, July 13, 1864, at New Orleans, La., to enter the Navy. 
Charles A. Byrant, Pembroke. 

Discharged, March 20, 1863, at Stewart^s Mansion Hospital, Haiti 
more, Md., for disability. 

Bertrand Burgess, E. Bridgewater. 

Died, March 20, 1864, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., of 
scarlet fever. 

George T. Chandler, Duxbury. 

Discharged, Feb. 15, 1868, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., for disability. 

Henry O. Chandler, Swansea. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14^ 1863; discharged, Feb. 16, 
1864, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 

Joseph H. Cook, E. Bridgewater. 

Discharged, Nov. 23, 1863, at Boston, for disability. 
Joshua Cook, E. Bridgewater. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles W. Denham, Pembroke. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles E. Dyer, E. Bridgewater. 

Died, Nov. 15, 1862, at Chesapeake Hospital, Fortress Monroe, Ya., 
of typhoid fever. ^^ 

Geoi^e H. Fish, Plymouth. ^^ 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., May 27^068; transferred to Yeteraa 
Reserve Corps, May 31, 1863. 

Joseph L. Fish, Pembroke. 

Died, Oct 31, 1862, at Hanson, Mass., of chronic diarrhoea, while 
home on a furlough. 

Joseph W. Fish, Cohasset. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; mustered out July, 1866. 
Otis Foster, Pembroke. 

Discharged Feb. 16, 1864, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 



ROLL OF COMPANY D. 267 

Enoch Freeman, Duxbury. ^ 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Samuel Gerrisb, Pembroke. 

Wounded at Bisland, La., April 18, 1863 ; transferred to Veteran 
Reserve Corps, May 31, 1863. 

Myron Gould, E. Bridgewater. 

Received sun-stroke, on the march to Clinton, La., June 5, 1863 ; 
died Aug. 26, 1863, at Baton Rouge. La., of chronic diarrhoea. 

Albert F. Greenwood, Plymouth. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863 ; discharged, Nov. 27, 
1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 

Benjamin Harvey, Plymouth. 

Discharged, Aug. 22, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Benjamin Hathaway, Plymouth. 

Discharged, June 30, 1863, at St. James Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 

John H. Haverstock, Plymouth. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
George Holbrook, Plymouth. 

Discharged, May 16, 1864, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 

Joshua Hollis, Pembroke. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Otis G. Hudson, E. Bridgewater. 

Missing in action, Sept. 19, 1864, at Winchester, Ya. ; supposed 
killed. 

Andrew M. Hyland, Cohasset. 

Died, Nov. 10, 1862, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Baltimore, 
Md,. of typhoid fever. 

James Kingman, E. Bridgewater. 

Died, June 14, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, of debility. 
William W. Lanman, Plymouth. 

Discharged, Dec. 27, 1862, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., for disability. 

Frank E. Lee, Bridgewater. 

Discharged, May 3, 1863, at Opelousas, La., for disability. 
William A. Lewis, Cohasset. 

Killed in action, June 14, 1863, at Port Hudson, La. 
Joseph B. Loring, Pembroke. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Daniel Lovett, Plymouth. 

Detailed at head-quarters. Gen. Sheridan, Nov. 26, 1864: dis- 
charged, June 10, 1866. 

Greorge E. Louzarder, E. Bridgewater. 

Discharged, Jan. 23, 1863, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., for disabilitv. 



268 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

James A. Lyon, Swansea, * 

Died, April 17, 1863, at Berwick City, La., of wounds received at 
Bisland, La., April 13, 1868. 

Patrick IMajruire, Plymouth. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Julius W. Monroe, Hanson. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct 19, 1864; died Feb. 18, 
1865, of starvation in Salisbury prison, N. C. 

George H. Morton, Kingston. 

Discharged, Feb. 27, 1868, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., for disability. 

Patrick O'Brien, Kingston. 

Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct 19, 1864; discharged, April 3, 
1865, at Cuyler Hospital, G«rmantown, Pa. 

William O'Brien, Bridgewater. 

Died, Nov. 9, 1862, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Baltimore, Md., 
of typhoid fever. 

John F. Perkins, Kingston. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
William A. Perkins, Halifax. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles S. Peterson, Plymouth. 

Discharged, Nov. 20, 1863, at Boston, for disability. 

Silas N. Peterson, Conway. 

Died, Nov. 10, 1862, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Baltimore, 
Md., of typhoid fever, 

Henry W. Price, Bridgewater. 

Discharged, Nov. 20, 1863, at Boston, for disability. 
Frederick R. Raymond, Plymouth. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Bradford Sampson, Duxbury. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1868; died, Aug. 27, 1864 
at New York, of chronic diarrhoea, while going home on a furlough J 

Eugene Sanger, E. Bridgewater. 

Killed in action, April 13, 1863, at Bisland, La. 
Thomas G Savery, Plymouth. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; discharged Dec. 28, 
1863, at Boston, for disability. 

John Scollard, Kingston. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 31, 1863. 
Frederick P. Sherman, Duxbury. 

Discharged, Feb. 7, 1864, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
William S. Sherman, Kingston. 

Discharged, Jan. 25, 1863, at Boston, for disability. 



BOLL OP COMPANY D. 269 



Henry Soule, Kingston. * 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 

Abel O. Stetson, Pembroke. 

Died of wounds received at Port Hudson, La., June 14, ir63. 

Illram F. Stevens, Pembroke. 

Died, Jan. 3, 1863, at Chesapeake Hospital, Hampton, Va., of inci- 
pient phthisis. 

Philip H. Tew, Pembroke. 

Discharged, Oct. 23, 1862, at Stewart's Mansion Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., for disability. 

Isfael H. Thrasher, Plymouth. 

Died June 29, 1868, at New Orleans, La., of wounds received at 
Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1868. 

James T. Thrasher, Plymouth. 
Mustered out, July, 1865. 

Sylvanus Tinkham, E. Bridgewater. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 31, 1863. 

Lorenzo Tower, Swansea. 

Died, at Brashear City, La., of wounds received at Bisland, La., 
April 13, 1863. 

George A. Wheeler, E. Bridgewater. 

Discharged at McClellan Hospital, Philadelphia, June 13, 1865. 

Samuel C. White, E. Bridgewater. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; absent sick at Post 
Hospital, Goldsboro', N. C, at muster out of regiment. 

Thomas Williston, CohasseL 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; discharged Oct. 20, 

1863, at Boston, for disability. 

Elbridge Winsor, Bridgewater. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863 ; discharged. May 16, 

1864, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 

UNDER-COOK8. 

William Henderson, Baton Rouge. 

Joined Regiment, Nov. 8, 1863; transferred to 26th Mass. Vet 
Vols., June 25, 1865. 

Lewis Matthews, Baton Rouge. 

Joined Regiment, Nov. 1, 1863; transferred to 25th Mass. Vet 
Vols., June 26, 1865. 

28* 



:70 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 



COMFAN7 E. 
CAPTAIN. 

John E. Smith, Lynn, Mass. 

On detached service since Aug. 18, 1868, at Boston Harbor; mns- 
tered out, July, 1865. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

Eben Parsons, Jr., Lynn. 

On detached service as Judge Advocate, fh>m Feb. 7, 1868; mus- 
tered out, June 23, 1865. 

Vivian K. Spear, Lynn. 

First Lieutenant, Feb. 27, 1863 ; wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 
14, 1863. 

William H. Whitney. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant from 1st Sergeant Co. A, March 4, 1868 ; 
transfeiTed to Co. C, Oct 14, 1868. 

Albert F. Bullard, Nevr Bedford. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant from Sergeant Major, Jan. 4, 1863; and ap- 
pointed to Co A; wounded at Port Hudson, Juno 14, 1863; pro- 
moted 1st lieutenant, Jan. 7, 63; in command of Co. K. ; mustered 
out, July, 1865. 

Horatio E. Macomber, Lynn. 

1st Sergeant, Feb. 4, 1863; Sergeant-Major, July 1st, 1868; 2d 
Lieutenant, Kov. 1, 1863 ; on Brigade Staff, nrom March 25, 
1864. 

SERGEANTS. 

Lemuel J. Gove, Lynn. 

Died at CarroUton, La., Feb. 8, 1863, of tj'phoid fever. 
William A. Atwill, Lynn. 

1st Sergeant, July 1, 1863 ; received commission as lieutenant, bat 
not mustered; mustered out, July, 1865. 

George W. A. R. Smith, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability, at New Orleans, La., July, 1863. 
Algernon Sidney Fisher, Lynn. 

Died, at Berwick City, La., April 27, 1863, of wounds received in 
action, at Bisland, La., April 13, 1863. 

John Alley, 5th, Lynn. 

Sergeant, March 1, 1868 ; discharged for disability, at New Or^ 
leans, La., Aug. 31, 1863. 

William H. Pecker, Lynn. 

Sergeant, July 1, 1868; mustered out, July, 1866. 



ROLL OF COMPANY E. 271 

Willmm H. Marston, Lynn. 

Sergeant, July 7, 1863 ; wounded at Port Hudson, May 28 ; killed 
in action at the battle of Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864. 

Robert F. Bagnall, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1863 ; Sergeant, Jan. 1, 1864; wound- 
ed in action, at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. 

Isaiah G. Hacker, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1863; Sergeant, March 1, 1865; wound- 
ed in action, Sep. 19, 1864 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 

Peter R. McGrengor, Lynn. 

Promoted Sergeant, July 1, 1863 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 

CORPORALS. 

James H. Broad, Lynn. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. 28, 1866. 
Augustus R. Parks, Lynn. 

discharged for disability, at New Orleans, La., July, 1868. 
Benjamin F. Tngalls, Lynn. 

Died at CarroUton, La., March 5, 1863, of typhoid fever. 
William H. Newhall, Lynn. 

Discharged to receive commission at New Orleans, La., May 2, 
1864. 

William E. Barnes, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, f863; mustered out, July, 1866. 
John F. Galeucia, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, Julv 1, 1868; discharged for disability, at Hall- 
town, Va., Aug. 26, 1864. 

Morris M. Keith, Bridtjewater. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1868; died at New Orleans, La., July 
19, 1864, of chronic diarrhcea. 

Charles H. Nesmith, Bridgefwater. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1868 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Theodore Tucker, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal ; wounded at the battle of Opequan ; died at 
Winchester, Va., Sept. 21, 1864, of wounds received in action. 
John C. Hilton, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, Jan. 1, 1864; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Amos H. Breed, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1866; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Asa Kimball, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1866 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Porter O. Kent, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, Aug. 26, 1864 ; on colors ; mustered out, July, 
1866. 



272 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Thomas A. Corson, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, July 12, 1864; wounded in action at Win- 
chester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; discharged at Chester Hospital, 
Pa., Dec. 29, 1864. 

George R. Mclntire, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1865; wounded in action, Sep. 19, 1864; 
mustered out, July, 1865. 

MUSICIANS. 

Charles T. Eaton, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles E. Mills, Stowe. 

Discharged for disability, at Fortress Monroe, Va., Feb. 26, 1863. 

PRIVATES. 

John N. Allen, Lynn. 

Taken Prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; returned to 
duty, April 23, 1865 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Robert R. Beckford, Lynn. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., April 7, 1868, of typhoid fever. 
Woodbridge Byrant, Bridgewater. 

Died at Carrollton, La., Jan. 14, 1863, of typhoid fever. 
James Brennan, Brewster. 

Wounded in action, Sept. 19, 1864; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Elbridge H. Bullard, Lynn. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14; discharged for disability, at 
General Hospital, Baltimore, Jan. 5, 1863. 
John M. Brown, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability, at Boston, Feb. 24, 1864. 
Greorge Bacon, Brookline. 

Deserted at Camp Emor>', Baltimore, Md., Nov. 6, 1862. 
Jonathan L. Bacheller, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James Birmingham, Lynn. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., July 11, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 
Alfred Bacheller, Lynn. 

Died at Baton Rouge, Aug. 3, 1863, of wounds received at siege of 
Port Hudson, July 4, 1863. 

Emery Clark, Stowe. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles M. Clark, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July,' 1865. 
John E. H. Chase, Brookline. 

Transferred to U. S. Navy, at New Orleans, La., Aug. 1, 1864. 



ROLL OF COMPANY E. 273 

Philo Carver, Bndgewater. 

Died at Baton Kouge, La., Sept. 14, 1868, of chronic diarrhoea. 
Barnabas F. Clark, Lynn. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 28, 1863, of diphtheria. 
John Cames, Lynn. 

Musftcred out, July, 1865. 
Alvin Conant, Bridgewater. 

Wounded at Opequan, Sept. 19 ; mustered out at Hilton Head, June 

8, 1865. 

James Collins, Lynn. 

Sick in hospital, from Aug*. 28, 1864. 
Cyrus A. Chadwell, Lynn. 

Sick in hospital, from Aug. 6, 1864. 
Joseph H. Dwyer, Brookline. 

Discharged for disability, at Univdrsity Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
Oct. 5, 1868. 

Henry H. Fuller, Brookline. 

Died at New Orleans, La., Aug. 16, 1868, of chronic diarrhoea. 
Frank M. Flynn, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
William J. Flynn, Lvnn. 

Wounded at Port lludson, June 14; transferred to Veteran Reserve 
Corps, April 10, 1864. 

George Flynn, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
David G. Goggins, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Frank Hunnewell, Lynn. 

On detached ser\'ice, from Sept. 13, 1862 ; taken prisoner at Cedar 
Creek. Va., Oct. 19, 1864; not heard from. 

Stephen A. Hall, South Dahvers. 

Discharged for disability, at New Orleans, La., Dec. 18, 1863. 
Stephen G. Hooper, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Granville Hartwell, Bridge water. 

Discharged for disability, at Fortress Monroe, Va., Feb. 17, 1868. 
Samuel E. Heath, Lynn. 

Died at Carrollton, La., Feb. 15, 1863, of t}'phoid fever. 
Timothy Harrington, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability, at New Orleans, La., Jan. 24, 1864. 
Owen Hurley, Lynn. 

Killed in action, at the battle of Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864. 
Charles E. Irvine, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July* 1865. 



274 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Clarkson T. Ingalls, Lynn. 

Sent to Post Hospital, Savannah, May 28, 1865. 

John Kain, Lynn. 

Sent to hospital at Frederick City, Md., Nov. 8, 1864; mustered 
out, at Frederick, Md., May 26, 1866. 

James Kitchen, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability, at Boston, Jan. 7, 1864. 

Lindley Kitchen, Lynn. 

Wounded in action, at the battle of Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864; 
died at Winchester, Sept., 1864, of wounds received in action. 

Daniel T. King, Lynn. 

On detached service from April 9, 1864, in Navy. 
Wilbur H. Kimball, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Amos L. Little, Lynn. 

Sent to Post Hospital, Savannah, May 28, 1866. 
Samuel E. Luscomb, Lynn. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., July 9, 1868, of chronic diarrhoea. 
Joseph Lindsey, Jr., Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, 1863 ; transferred to Vet Reserve Corps, 1864. 
Willliam H. McKay, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability at Boston, Mass., June 18, 1864. 
Henry A. Martin, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability at New Orleans, La., May 9, 1863 
James C. Mclntire, Lynn. 

Wounded in action at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; died at 
New Orleans, La., July 2, 1863, of wounds received in action. 

Joshua VV. Mudge, Lynn. 

Discharged at Boston, Mass., May, 1866, on account of wounds re- 
ceived at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864. Mr. Mudge took great 
interest in the religious welfare of the reginieut, tilling the place 
of chaplain during the absence of Col. lugraham. As agent of 
the Christian Commission, after the disasters on the Red River, 
his kindness will ever be remembered by the regiment. 

Walter C. Matthews, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability at Boston, Mass., Oct. 26, 1863. 
George A. Newhall, South Danvers. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Joseph P. Noyes, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability at New Orleans, La., May 9, 1868. 
Uriah Phelps, Bridgewater. 

Discharged, Sept. 16, 1862 ; excess of maximum. 
Andrew J. Pratt, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability at Portsmouth Grove, R. I., March 4, 1868. 



ROLL OF COMPANY E. 275 

William H. Pearson, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
William T. Phillips, Lynn. 

Died at New Orleans, La., Aug. 12, 1864, of chronic diarrhosa. 
William A. Phipps, Lynn. 

Discharged, Sept. 15 1862, excess of maximum. 
Benjamin W. Price, Bridgewater. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, April 30, 1864. * 
Charles Q.uimby, Lynn. 

Transferred to Navy, July 1, 1864. 
Israel Richmond, Bridgewater. 

Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps, April 10, 1864. 
Thomas Ryan, Lynn. 

Deserted at Camp Stanton, Lynnfield, Mass., Aug. 22, 1862. 
Wesley Reed, Lynn. 

Discharged for disahility at U. S. Gren. Hospital at Baltimore, Md. 
Nov. 13, 1862. 

Joseph P. Ramsdell, Lynn. 

Taken prisoner, Oct. 19, 1864, at Cedar Creek, Va. 
Daniel L. Seavey, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability at Boston, Mass., Nov. 9, 1863. 
Charies Smith, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles B. Smith, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James B. Saul, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 24, 1868. 
Rufiis S. South worth, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
John Shehan, Lynn. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James H. Tuttle, Lynn. 

Lost left arm by accident while on fatigue duty at Morehead City, 
March 28, 1865. 

William Wood, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 10, 1868. 
Dennis Welch, Lynn. 

Discharged for disability at Boston, Mass., Jan. 8, 1864. 
Henry K. White, Lynn. 

Taken prisoner, Oct. 19, 1864, at Cedar Creek, Va. ; died at Salis- 
bury, N. C, Nov. 24, 1864. 

James Walter, Lynn. 

Taken prisoner, Oct. 19, 1864, at Cedar Creek, Va. ; died at Camp 
Parole, Annapolis, Md., March 21, 1865. 



276 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

William p. Corson, Lynn. 

Joined, Jan. 2, 1864; transferred to 26th Massachusetts, June 22 
1865. 

Luther D. Grove, Boston. 

Joined, April 26, 1865 ; transferred to 26th Massachusetts, June 22 
1866. 

William H. Tuck, Lynn. 

Joined, Aug. 19, 1864; wounded at Opequan, Sept. 19, 1864; trans- 
ferred to 26th Massachusetts, June 22, 1865. 

Patrick O'Neill, Wellfleet. 

Joined, Feb. 26, 1864; died at New Orleans, La., April 30, 1864, 
of chronic diarrhoea. 

COLORED COOK. 

William Lee, Baton Rouge. 

Joined at Baton Rouge, La., Nov. 1, 1863 ; transferred to 26th Mas- 
sachusetts, June 22, 1865. 



COMPANY P. 

CAPTAIN. 

Taylor P. Rundlet, Cambridge. 

Capt. Rundlet held the position^ of Assistant Inspector-General, on 
tne Brigade Staff, for many months, of Provost Marshal in 
Winchester, Va., Morehead City, and Goldsborough, and of Pr«.- 
vost Judge in Savannah; wounded at Po»i Hudson, May 2ft, 1863 ; 
mustered out, July, 1865. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

Joseph A. Hildreth, Cambridge. 

Promoted Captain, and appointed to Company K, March 4, 1863. 
Frank A. Nash, Abington. 

Promoted Ist Lieutenant, and appointed to Company F, April 23, 
1863; resigned, March 7, 1864. 

James T. Davis, Cambridge. 

Promoted 1st Sergeant, Jan. 4, 1863; Sergeant-Major, March 3, 
1863; 2d Lieutenant, and appointed to Cc»mpany I, March 3, 
1868; Ist Lieutenant, and transferred to Company K, Oct. 24, 
1863; transferred to Company F, March 19, lt>64; wounded in 
action at Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864; received commission «s 
Captain, Sept. 16, 1864, but not mustered; mustered out, July, • 
1865. 



ROLL OP COMPANY F. 277 

Edward G Pike, Cambridge. 

Promoted Adjutant, Feb 8, 1863. 
Nathan Russell, Jr., Cambridge. 

Promoted 1st Sergeant, March 3, 1863; 2d Lieutenant, April 19 
1863; 1st Lieutenant, and transferred to Company I, Jan. 9, 1864; 
wounded in action, -at Port. Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. 

SERGEANTS. 

Walter W. Nourse, Cambridge. 

Promoted to Sergeant-Major, Jan. 4, 1863; died at Garrollton, La., 
March 3, 1863, of typhoid fever. 

John H. Butler, Cambridge. 

Promoted Sergeant, March 3, 1868; Sergeant-Major, Nov. 15, 1868. 
Benjamin T. Rice, Cambridge. 

Promoted Sergeant, Nov. 1, 1862; 1st Sergeant, April 2, 1863; dis- 
charged at Boston, June 3. 1864, on account of disability, caused 
by exposure, at siege of Port Hudson, La. 

Austin C. Wellington, Cambridge. 

Promoted Serjeant, April 2, 1863; 1st Sergeant, June 3, 1864; ap- 
pointed actmg Adjutant, Aug. 1864; received commissions as 
2d and Ist Lieutenants, but not mustered. 

Alphonso M. Lunt, Cambridge. 

Promoted Sergeant, July 1, 1863. Sergeant Lunt carried the battle- 
flag through the battles of Cane River, Mansura, and Opequan 
Creek, ana distinguished himself for especial bravery in the 
latter engagement; mustered out, July, lb66. 

J. Frank Angell, Cambridge. 

Killed in action, at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. Sergt. Angell 
left the hospital while still suffering from disease, and hastened 
to the regiment, which he joined a few days^ before the battle. 

W. Forbes Wilson, Boston. 

Promoted Corporal, Sept. 25, 1862; Sergeant, Jan. 4, 1863; wound- 
ed in action at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; discharged to 
accept a commission in Corps d'Afrique, Feb. 29, 1864. Sergeant 
Wilson, already wounded in two places, was raising himself up 
to give water to a New York soldier, badly wounded, and sutier- 
ing from thirst, when he received a third shot in the head. 

Thomas F. Palmer, Boston. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1863; Sergeant, Nov. 15, 1863; wound- 
ed in action at Winchester, Va.,Sept. 19, 1864, while in command 
of Company; mustered out, July, 1866. 

Alonzo L. Hodges, Boston. 

Promoted Sergeant, April 3. 1864 Sergeant Hodge* carried the 
battle-flag through the engagements at Hisland, and during the 
siege at Port Hudson, as welfas on the march through the 1 ^che 
country; but, receiving a sun-stroke, was compelled to give u,' 
his position. 

S4 



278 THE STORT OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Martin G. Childs, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Nov. 15, 1863; Sergeant, July 1, 1864; kiUed 
in action, at Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 22, 1864. 

CORPORALS. « 



Henry H. Keniston, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baton Rouge, La., July 21, 1863, for disability; died 
after leaving service. 

Henry L. Mitchell, Cambridge. 

Discharged, March 1, 1864, to accept a commission in 1st New 
Orleans (white) Regiment. 

Levi Langley, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct. 18, 1862; died, Oct. 4, 1863, at Baton 
Rouge, La., of typhoid fever, 

H. Oriando Gale, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Jan. 4, 1863: died, June 5, 1863, while on the 
passage from Springfield Landing to Baton Rouge. Corporal 
Gale performed the latter part of the march to Port Hudson un- 
der severe suffering, went into the fight on the 27th of May, and 
remained in the ravines until the withdrawal of the regiment to 
the woods, when he was taken with a severe fever, and died in a 
few days, — even in his delirium expressing the tiBar that he was 
not doing his full duty. The writer will be allowed to pay this 
slight tribute to the memory of a messmate and fiiend, whose 
loss was mourned by all who knew him. 

Warren Cotton, Cambridge. 

Discharged, Feb. 18, 1864, to accept a commission in Corps d'Af- 
rique. 

William L. Champney, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, March 3, 1863 ; killed in action at Port Hud- 
son, La., June 14, 1863. Corporal Chainpiiey was an active 
member of the volunteer militia of Boston, and, upon the breaking 
out of the war, enlisted in the First Massachusetts, in which re^- 
ment he served until discharged bv the surgeon for disability 
caused by the severe duty performed in Virginia. Upon his recov- 
ery, he enlisted in the Thirty Eighth, and faithfully performed 
his duty, being ever in his place on the march, often under cir- 
cumstances which would have discouraged most men. He was 
killed early in the engagement. 

George D. Towne, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, April 2, 1863; wounded at Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, 1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 

George W. Powers, Boston. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1868; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Arthur C. Day, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, July 1, 1863; mustered out, July, 1866. 



ROLL OF COMPANY F. 279 

Abram P. Eaton, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Sept. 29, 1863; wounded in action at Port 
Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 

John E. Pratt, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Sept. 29, 1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Edward A. Brown, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct. 4, 1863; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Charles E. Neale, Cambridge. 

Promoted Corporal, April 3, 1864; wounded at Port Hudson, La., 
May 27, 1863; killed in action at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864. 

MUSICIANS. 

Charles Munroe, Cambridge. 

Promoted to principal musician, Jan. 1, 1864; mustered out, July, 
1865. 



George A. Copp, Cambridge. 
Mustered out, July, 1865. 



WAGONER. 

Joseph O. Bullard, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 80, 1864. 

PRIVATES. 

John Anglin, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Matthias Barry, Cambridge, 

Wounded in action, at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1868; dis- 
charged at New Orleans, La., Nov. 6, 1863. 

William J. Barry, Cambridge. 

Absent on detached Service, in Q. M. Department, Readville, at 
muster out of Regiment. 

Joseph G. Bartlett, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Herman Bird, Cambridge. 

Discharged, Oct. 13, 1864, for disability. 
George R. Blake, Cambridge. 

Killed in action at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. Mr. Blake 
declined promotion repeatedly urged upon him by bis com- 
manding officer, satisfied to do his duty in the ranks, where he 
met his death while advancing on the breastworks. 

Asa V. Borden, Cambridge. 
Mustered out, July, 1865. 



2^0 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Abraham Bradley, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Augustus W. Brainard, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
George W. Brainard, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Benjamin R. Bryant, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
George L. Burton, Cambridge. 

Killed in action at Opequan Creek, Va., Sept 19, 1864. 
Arthur Campbell, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 

George A. Cole, Cambridge. 

Discharged, Aug. 24, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
William S. Copp, Cambridge. ^ 

Died, May 24, 1863, at New Orleans, La., of diarrhoea. 
Charles P. Cummings, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
John H. Dame, Cambridge. 

Killed in action, at Port Hudson, La., May 25, 1863. 
Henry O. Downing, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 30, 1864. 
James H. Duhig, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865; died a few days after leaving service. 

Greorge Emerson, Cambridge. 

On detached service, in Mississippi Squadron, from May 10, 1864. 
Richard A. Fitzgerald, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Patrick Foley, Cambridge. 

Wounded in action, at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; dis- 
charged at New Orleans, La., Feb. 1, 1864. 

Edward E. Folger, Cambridge. 

Discharged, June 1, 1863, for disability. 
Hiram T. Foster, Cambridge. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, July, 1864. 
Augustus Gaffee, Boston, 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 30, 1864. 
John M. Gilcreas, Cambridge. 

Died, at New Orleans, La., June 26, 1863, of wounds received m 
action, at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. 

James Golden, Cambridge. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., June 16, 1863, of congestive fever. 



ROLL OF COMPANY F. 281 

Jobn T. Gowen, Cambridge. 

Died at New Orleans, La., March 19, 1868, of malarial cochexia. 
Daniel Hancock, Cambridge. ^ 

Mustered out, July, lb65. 
Augustus P. Hanson, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Luther Hapgood, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Ambrose K. Hardinbrook, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Ward W. Hawkes, Cambridge. 

Wounded in action, at Port Hudson, La., Jun« 14, 1863; discharged 
Nov. 7, 1863. 

Lewis O. Hawkins, Seekonk. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Edward Hogan, Cambridge. 

Absent sick in hospital at Readville, at muster out of regiment. 
Joseph A. Holt, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Walter J. Hixon, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Boston, Jan. 26, 1864, for disability. 
Alfred Jennings, Cambridge. 

Died, at Carrion Crow Bayou, La., Nov. 17, 1863. 
Warren Eenniston, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Boston, March 24, 1864, for disability. 
John Leary, Cambiidge. 

Absent sick at Carver Gen. Hospital, Washington, D. 0. 
Adolpbe M. Leve, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Greorge Macomber, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
George Mansise, Cambridge. 

Alustered out, July, 1865. 

James M. Mason, Cambridge. 

Absent sick at Armorj' Square Hospital, Washington, D. C. 
George R. McPherson, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baltimore, Md., Dec. 13, 1862, for disability. 
W. Frank Morse, Cambridge. ^ 

Discharged at Franklin, La., Jan. 29, 1864, to accept position as 
citizen clerk, in Q. M. Department. 

Joseph A. Morris, Cambridge. 

Killed in action, at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. He was but 
eighteen years of age, and the only remaining son of a widow who 
had already given one son to the country. 
24* 



282 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Nathaniel Munroe, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Philip Nelligan, Cambridge.^ 

Mastered out, July, 1865. 
Frank Orcutt, Cambridge. 

Discharged, Oct. 22, 1863, to accept a commission in Corps d^ Afrique. 
Charles Parker, Cambridge. 

Died, at Baton Rouge, La., Sept. 20, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 

John Powers, Cambridge. 

Wounded, at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1864; died at Baton 
Rouge, La., May 11, 1864, of wounds received in action, at Cane 
River, La., April 23, 1864. 

George H. Prior, Cambridge. 

Promoted to Q. M. Sergeant, May 28, 1864. 
James Redfern, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baton Rouge, La., Dec. 24, 1863, for disability. 
William C. Rice, Cambridge. 

Discharged, March 24, 1864, to accept a commission in Corps d'Af- 
rique. 

George W. Robbins, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Fortress Monroe, Va., Jan. 25, 1863, for disability. 
Geoige S. Russell, Cambridge. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., Maj' 25, 1868 ; wounded at Win- 
chester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Albert L Sands, Cambridge. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., July 3, 1863, for disability. 
Joshua H. Sawin, Cambridge. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Greorge W. Seaward, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Fortress Monroe, Va., Feb. 10, 1863, for disability. 
Benjamin A. Small, Cambridge. 

Discharged at Baltimore, Md., March 9, 1863, for disability. 
Alpheus Spaulding, HoUiston. 

Died at New Orleans, La., June 16, 1863, of .chronic diarrhoea. 
Edward M. Stearns, Cambridge. , 

Absent sick at Armory Square Hospital, Washington, D. C 
William L. Stevens, Cambridge. 

Died at New Orleans, La., July 10, 1863, of diarrhoea. 
George Symons, Cambridge. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; paroled and 
mustered out, July, 1865. ^ 

Charles H. Taylor, Charlestown. 

Wounded in action, at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; dis- 
charged, Dec. 18, 1863. 



k 



ROLL OF COMPANY G. 288 



John H. Tucker, Cambridge. 

Killed in action, at Port Hudson, La., May 27, 1863. Mr. Tucker 
had but recently graduated from Harvard, and was preparing for 
the ministry at the breaking out of the war. With no taste for 
military pursuits, or ambition for military honors, he entered the 
ranks from unmixed motives of duty, bore the privations of 
the service with a cheerfulness which excited the admiration 
of all who witnessed it, and died regretted by every man in the 
regiment who enjoyed the privilege of his acquaintance. 

Charles White, Cambridge. 

Died at Brashear, La., May 30, 1868. 
Daniel T. Duhig, Cambridge. 

Enlisted, Jan. 6, 1864; transferred to 26th Beg. Mass. Vols., June 
22, 1865. 

David Shattels, Baton Rouge, La. 

Enlisted, Dec. 28, 1863; died at New Orleans, La., July 26, 1864, 
of malarial cochexia. 

Abner Smith, Taunton. 

Enlisted, Jan. 27, 1864 ; captured by Mosby's Guerillas, in Shenan- 
doah Valley, Nov. 1864; died at Bamet, Vermont, April 10, 1865, 
from effects of starvation, while prisoner of war. 

Eugene C. Wells, Taunton. 

Enlisted, Jan. 27, 1864; transferred to 26th Reg. Mass Vol.«<., June 
22, 1865. 

John J. Dalgiish, Concord. 

JSnlisted, Feb. 21, 1865; transferred to 26th Reg. Mass. Vols., June 
22, 1865. 

COLORED UNDER-COOK. 

George Harris, Baton Rouge, La. 

Enlisted, Sept. 24, 1863; transferred to 26th Reg. Mass. Vols., June 
22, 186f . 



COMPANY a. 
CAPTAIN. 

Charles C. Doten, Plymouth. 

Resigned on account of ill health, May 20, 1863 Capt. Doten was 
in command of the color division ((Companies A and G) at the 
battle of Bisland, and received the especial commendation of Gens. 
Banks and Emory for his courage and coolness on that occasion. 
Never allowing passion to overcome his judgment in dealing with 
the men in the ranks, to wiioni the new restraints of military -lis- 
cipline were often rendered unneceasarilv irritating by the over- 
bearing manners of petty officers, the resfgnatiou of Captain Doten 
was regretted by the entire command. He was afterward in per- 
vice in the telegraph department. 



?84 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 



jcorge B. Russell, Plymoutb. 

Promoted Ist Lieutenant, Dec. 4, 1862; transferred to Co. P, 
March 4. 1868; wounded at Port Hudson, La, June 14, llo.; 
promoted Captain, and appointed to Co. G, Nov. 1, 18b8; dis- 
charged, Sept. 14, 1864, and commissioned in Veteran Eesen'e 
Corps ; afterward rrovost Marshal at Washington, in which posi- 
tion it became a part of his duties to assist in the execution ot 
the prison-keeper of Anderson ville. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

Albert Mason, Plymouth. 

Transferred from Co. C to Co. G, April 22, 1863 ; re-transferred from 
Co. G to C, Jan. 8, 1864. 

William H. Whitney, Cambridge. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant, and appointed to Co. E. March 4, 1863: 
1st Lieutenant, and appointed to Co. C, Oct. 14, 1863 ; transferred 
from Co. C to Co. G, Jan. 8, 1864; discharged, Dec. 20, 1864. on 
account of wounds received at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1'».4. 
Lieutenant Whitney received a captain'^s commission, but, the 
regiment being reduced below the standard required by the War 
Department for a fiill complement of officers, could not be mu«*- 
tered. 

Frederic Holmes, Plymouth. 

Promoted Sergeant Major, Nov. 1, 1862; 2d Lieutenant, Dec 4, 
1862; killed in action at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. 



SERGEANTS. 

G. Hubert Bates, Scituate. 

Promoted Ist Sergeant, Nov. 1, 1862; discharged at Algiers, La., 
April 3, 1863, for disability. 

Charles E. Barns, Plymouth. 

Promoted 1st Sergeant, March 1, 1863; discharged, May 4, 1863, 
at Opelousas, La., for disability. 

Josiah E. Atwood, Carver. 

Died, July 11, 1863, at Thibadeaux, La., while a prisoner in the 
hands of the enemy. 

Nahum Sampson, Duxbury. 

Discharged, Nov. 26, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Sanford Crandon, Plymouth. 

Promoted Sergeant, Nov. 1, 1862; 1st Sergeant, May 1, 1S63; 
wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14^ 1863; received com 
mission as lieutenant, but not mustered ; mustered out, Juh% 1^6 j. 

Charles Young, Scituate. 

Sergeant, May 5, 1863; wounded at Port Hudson, La, June 14, 
lb63; on furlough by order of War Department, from Oct. 6, 
1864, to enable him to enter the Tel. Coips. 



ROLL OF COMPANY G. 285 

Henry (). Cole, Scituate. 

Promoted Sergeant, Sept. 1, 1863; Ist Sergeant, June 1, 1866; 
mustered out, July, 1865. 

Charles W. Lanmar, Plymouth. 

Promoted Sergeant, Jan. 1, 1864; in Massachusetts on recruiting 
service since August, 1863. 

Henry H. Lewis, Duxbury. 

Promoted Corporal, March, 1, 1863; Sergeant, Jan. 1, 1864; mus- 
tered out, July, 1866. 

CORPORALS. 

Francis B. Dorr, Duxbury. 

Died, May 13, 1863, at New Orleans, La. 
Joseph A. Brown, Plymouth. 

Discharged at Baltimore, Md. 
William A. Hathaway, Plymouth. 

Died Feb. 23, 1863, at Convalescent Camp, Va. 
Eugene Glass, Duxbury. 

Discharged, Dec. 27, 1862, at Baltimore, Md., for disability. 
Melzar A. Foster, Kingston. 

Promoted Corporal, Nov. 27, 1862; died, Jan. 21, 1863, at Carroll- 
ton, La. 

George W. Merritt, Scituate. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct. 1862; Sergeant, May 1. 1868; discharged, 
Aug. 13, 1863, at New Orleans, La., tor disability. 

John J. Lewis, Duxbury. 

Promoted Corporal, March 1, 1863; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Otis D. Totman, Scituate. 

Promoted Corporal, March 1, 1863 ; died, April 18, 1863, at Baton 
Kouge, La. 

Austin Washburn, Plympton. 

Promoted Corporal, March 1, 1863; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Charles C. White, Plympton. 

Promoted Corporal, May 5,1863; wouilded at Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, 1863 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 

George W. Lee, Scituate. 

Promoted Corporal, May 6, 1863; discharged, Nov. 1, 1868, at Bos- 
ton, for disability. 

Lewis M. Bailey, 2d, Duxbury. 

Promoted Corporal, Jan. 1, 1864; wounded at Port Hudson, La., 
May 27, 1863; mustered out, July, 1866. 

James Downey, Duxbury. 

Promoted Corporal, Jan. 1, 1864; on colors; mustered out, July,1866. 
Sumner O. Litchfield, Scituate. 

Promoted Corporal, Jan. I, 1864; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., 
Oct. 19, 1864; discharged, June 9, 1866. 



286 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Heman Robbins, Pl}inontli. 

Promoted Corporal, Jan. 4, 1864; mustered oat Julj, 1866. 

PRIVATES. 

John Breach, Carver. 

Died, May 11, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La. 
George E. Bates, Carver. 

Died, May 21, 1863, at Baton Booge, La., of phthisis. 
Charles E. Bates, Scitnate. 

Discharged, Feb. 3, 1863, at Baltimore, Md., for disability. 
William Baily, Duxbury. 

Died, March 29, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., of chronic diarrhoea. 
Seth K. Bailey, Scitnate. 

Died, Sept 6, 1862, at Baltimore, Md. 
James Berry, Scituate. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
John Berry, Scituate. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Joseph P. Bosworth, Jr., Duxbury. 

Discharged, Nov. 6, 1868, at Boston, for disability. 
James L. Brown, Scituate. 

Discharged, July 23, 1863, New Orleans, La., for disability. 
Charles J. Chandler, Plymouth. 

• Died, Feb. 18, 1863, at CairoUton, La., of bronchitis. 
Job C. Chandler, Plymouth. 

Transferred to 1st Louisiana Cavalry; Feb. 5, 1863. 
Alonzo Chandler, Duxbury. 

Absent, sick in Lovell's Hospital, Portsmouth Grove, B. I. 
Samuel W. Cook, Scituate. 

Discharged, Aug. 6, 1864, at Boston, for disability. 
John H. Crocker, Duxbury. 

Died, April 21, 1863, at Berwick City, La., of wounds received at 
Bisland, La., April 13, 1863. 

Timothy Downey, Scituate. 

Discharged, Nov. 26, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Edwin F. Damon, Marshfield. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Timothy T. Eaton, Plymouth. 

Absent, at Readville Hospital, Mass., at muster-out of regiment. 
Lemuel B. Faunce, Jr., Plymouth. 

Died, April 23, 1866, at Goldsboro', N. C, of internal rupture. 
James Frothingham, Plymouth. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 



ROLL OF COMPANY G. 287 

Israel B. Finney, Plympton. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Ezra J. Ford, Duxbury. 

Discharged, Sept. 21, 1863, at Baltimore, Md., for disability. 

Edward E. Green, Plymouth. 

Died, July 11, 1868, at Baton Rouge, La., of chronic dysentery. 
Abiel Gibbs, Plympton. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Jan. 10, 1866 ; wounded at 
Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1868. 

Jonathan Glass, Jr., Duxbury. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 22, 1864. 
Seth Glass, Duxbury. 

Died, June 15, 1863, on board hospital transport, of wounds re- 
ceived at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1868. 

Isaac T. Hall, Plymouth. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Thomas Haley, Plymouth. 

Died, April 5, 1863, at New Orleans, La., of phthisis. 
John B. Hatch, Carver. 

Discharged, March 27, 1863, at CarroUton, La., for disability. 
Samuel Harriman, Duxbury. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
John Hogan, Plympton. 

Discharged, March 14, 1863, at CarroUton, La., for disability. 

Caleb M. Jenkins, Scituate. 

Discharged, July 15, 1863, at New Orleans, La., for disability. 

Issachar Josslyn, Plymouth. 

Discharged, April 3, 1863, at Algiers, La., for disability. 
John E. Josslyn, Plymouth. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Bernard F. Kelley, Plymouth. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Robert W. Lashores, Plympton. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1868; taken prisoner at 
Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864; paroled; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Warren S. Litchfield, Scituate. 

Died, Sept. 4, 1868, at Baton Rouge, La. 
Edgar F. Loring, Duxbury. 

Discharged, May 27, 1863, at CarroUton, La., for disability. 
Jesse F. Lucas, Carver. 

Transferred to First Louisiana Cavalrv, Feb. 6, 1863; re -transferred 
•to Co. G, 88th., Aug. 23, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Joseph McLaughlin, Plymouth. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 



288 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

John McNaught, Duxbury. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James Mc Sherry, Carver. 

Died, Jan. 13, 1868, at Fortress Monroe, Va. 
Elias O. Nichols, Scituate. 

Corporal, Jan. 1, 1864; taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 
19, 1864; never heard from. 

William Perry, Plymouth. 

Died, June 5, 1863, at New Orleans, La. 
Leander B. Pierce, Duxbury. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
William W. Pearsons, Carver. 

Discharged, Sept. 1, 1864, at New Orleans, La., for disability. 
George H. Pratt, Carver, 

Died, October, 1864, of wounds received at Winchester, Va., Sept. 
19, 1864. 

Jason H. Randall, Duxbury. 

Mustered out, July, lt65. 
Josiah D. Randall, Duxbury. 

Discharged, July 19, 1864, at Boston, for disability. 
Levi Ransom, Jr., Plymouth. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 26, 1863. 
Adrian D. Kuggles, Plymouth. 

Absent, sick at Newbern, N. C, at muster-out of r^ment. 
Eelen Sampson, 2d, Duxbury. 

Died, at Baton Kouge, La., May 7, 1864, of wounds received at Cane 
River, La., April 23, 1864. 

Isaac L. Sampson, Duxbury. 

Discharged, Jan. 20, 1863, at Baltimore, Md., for disability. 
Benjamin H. Savery, Carver. 

Discharged, July, 1863, at Opelousas, La., for disability. 
William Savery, Kingston. 

Discharged, May 17, 1866, at Satterlee Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., 
for disability. 

Horatio Sears, Plymouth. 

Absent, sick at Mason's Gen. Hospital, Boston, at muster-out of 
regiment. 

Otis Sears, Plymouth. 

Wounded at Bisland, April 13, 1863; died, Jan. 6, 1864, at Plym- 
outh, while on a furlough. 

Perez T. Shurtleff, Carver. 

Discharged, Sept. 12, 1863, at New Orleans, La., for disability. 
Abram P. Simmons, Duxbury. 

Discharged, Aug. 29, 1863, at Boston, for diitability. 



BOLL OP COMPANY G. 289 

Daniel F. Simmons, Diixbury. 

Died, May 1, 1863, at Berwick City, La., of wounds received at 
J5island, La., April 18, 1863. 

Wilbur Simmons, Duxbury. 

Died, April 27, 1863, at Berwick City, La., of wounds received at 
Bisland, La., April 13, 1863. 

Bennett Soule, Plympton. 

Died, June 6. 1863, at Brashear City, La. 
William Soule, Duxbury. 

Discharged, Aug. 13, 1868, at New Orleans, La., for disability. 
Benjamin E. Stetson, Scituate. 

Mustered out, July, 1866 ; wounded at Port Hudson, La., May 27. 
Charles A. Taylor, Scituate. 

Discharged, Feb. 16, 1864, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
George W. Thomas, Halifax. 

Discharged, May 26, 1868, at New Orleans, La., for disability. 
Joseph F. Towns, Plymouth. 

Mustered out, July, 1863. 
Levi C. Vaughan, Carver. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, April 6, 1864. 
John M. Whiting, Plymouth. 

Killed in action, Sept. 19, 1864, at Winchester, Ya. 
Corindo Winsor, Duxbury. 

Discharged, at Alexandria, Ya., for disability. 

Davis C. Witherell, Scituate. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles T. Wood, Plymouth. 

Discharged, Feb. 5, 1863, at Carrollton, La., for disability. 
John W. Young, Scituate. 

Discharged, Dec. 27, 1862, at Baltimore, Md., for disability. 
Henry Bums, Boston. 

Joined, Oct. 17, 1864; transferred to 26th Mass. Yet. Vols., Jane 

25, 1865. 

Abram Glass, Duxbury. 

Joined, Jan. 2, 1864; transferred to 26th Mass. Yet. Vols., Jane 
25, 1865. 

Ethan A. Josslyn, Boston. 

Joined, Oct. 16, 1864; transferred to 26th Mass. Yet. Vols. June 

26, 1865. 

Edward Allsworth, Baton Rouge. 

Joined, Jan. 5, 1864; discharged, Jan. ft, 1865, at Winchester, Ya., 
to accept a commission in 119th U. S. C. T. 

25 



290 THE STORY OP THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 



COMPANY H. 



Thomas R. Rodman, New Bedford. 

On detached service as mastering officer in Baton Rouge, La., from 
Sept. 28, 1863, to summer of 1864; mustered out, July, IbUo. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

Julius M. Lathrop, Dedham. . 

Promoted Captain, Feb. 27, 1868, and transferred to Go. I; died 
April 26, 1864, of wounds received in action at Gand River, 
April 28, 1864. 

Charles C. Howland, Boston. 

Promoted 1st Lieutenant, March 8, 1863 ; Gaptain, and appointed 
to Co. D, Oct. 14, 1863. 

Charles F. Shaw, New Bedford 

Promoted Sergeant, Dec. 4, 1862 ; 2d Lieutenant, Aug. 81, 1868 ; 
mustered out, July, 1865. 

SERGEANTS. 

George A. Fletcher, Milton. 

Transfen-cd to Go. I, Sept. 26, 1862. 
Albert H. Nye, New Bedford. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Nov. 13, 1863. 
Leander A. Tripp, New Bedford. 

Died at Morganza, La., June 80, 1864, of chronic diairhoea. 
Peter C. Brooks, Dartmouth. 

Died at Wenham, Mass., Feb. 14, 1864, of chronic diarrhoea. 
Albert F. Bullard, New Bedford. 

Promoted 1st Sergeant, Sept 16, 1862; Sergeant Major, Dec. 4, 
1862. 

George F. Lincoln, New Bedford. 

Promoted Sergeant, Dec. 4, 1862; wounded at Opequan Creek, 
Sept. 19, 1864; absent at muster-out of regiment 

William C. Thomas, New Bedford. 

Promoted Quartermaster Sergeant, Jan. 31, 1863. 
James M. Davis, New Bedford. 

Promoted Commissary Sergeant, Feb. 1, 1868. 
James N. Parker, New Bedford. 

Promoted Sergeant, May 10, 1863; wounded at Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, 1863; on recruiting service from Aug. 17, 1868; mus- 
tered out, July, 1865. 



ROLL OF COMPANY H. 291 

George D. Bisbee, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct. 9, 1862 ; Sergeant, Sept. 1, 1863 ; wounded 
at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; niu.^tered out, July, 1865. 

Thomas E. Bliffens, Dartmouth. 

Promoted Corpoidl, May 10, 1863; Sergeant, May 1, 1864; dis- 
charged on account of wounds received at Uaiie Kiver, La., April 
23, 1864. 

Benjamin Hillman, New Bedford. 

Promoted f'orporal, April 10, 1863; Sergeant, July 1, 1864; 
wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, IbbS; mustered out, 
July, 1866. 

Henry Hillman, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, April 10, 1868; Sergeant, May 1, 1866; 
wounded and taken prisoner at Opequan Creek, Sept. 10, 1864; 
paroled Oct. 9, 1864; mustered out, July, 1866. 

CORPORALS. 

J. B. Bullock, New Bedford. ^ 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., May 27, 1863; transferred to Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps, April 30, 1864. 

William H. Bolles, New Bedford. 

Discharged at Baton Rouge, La., Feb. 1864, for disability. 
David B« Angell, New Bedford. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La. Aug. 24, 1863, for disability. 
Charles E. Hamlin, New Bedford, 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James Egerton, New Bedford. 

Detailed as regimental shoemaker; mustered out, July, 1866. 
George E. Hawes, New Bedford. 

Corporal, Aug. 9, 1862 ; died at Hampton, Va., Dec. 14, 1862, of 
typhoid fever. 
William E. Davis, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct. 9, 1862; discharged at CarroUton, La., 
Feb. 6, 1868, for disability. 

Silas C. Kenney, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct. 9, 1862; killed in action at Port Hudson, 
La., June 14, 1868. 

Benjamin L. McLane, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct. 3, 1862; discharged Nov. 26, 1868, for 
disability. 

Edward J. Anthony, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, Dec. 14, 1863; discharged, Oct. 16, 1863, to 
accept a commission. 

Otis B. Phinney, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, June 14, 1868 ; taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, 
Oct. 19, 1864; paroled, March 2, 1866; mustered out, July, 1865. 



292 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Sylvanus A. Gifford, Xew Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, Aug. 28, lh63; mustered out, May 23, 1864. 
Greorge W. Swift, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, Aug. 28, lfc63; wounded at Opequan Creek, 
Sept. 19, 1664; taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Uct. 19, 1864; 
paroled, March 2, 1865; mustered out, July, 1866. 

William A. Tripp, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct. 6, 1863 ; mustered out at Savannah, Ga. 
June, 1865. 

Edwin R. Pool, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, Oct 9, 1863; taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, 
Oct. Itf, 1864; died at Salisbury, N. C, Dec. 1, 1864. 

John P. Brenning, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1865; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Naaman H. Dillingham, New Bedford. . 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1865; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Gilbert M. Jennings, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, lb65; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Reuben E. Phinney, New Bedford. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1865; mustered out, July, 1865. 

MUSICIAN. 

Manning C. Davy, Weymouth. 

Mustered as private from Oct. 31, 1862 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

PRIVATES. 

Bartholomew Aiken, New Bedford. 

Died at Carrollton, La., Jan. 20, 1863, of typhoid fever. 
James C. Baker, New Bedford. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., Aug. 22, 1863, for disability. 
Silas R. Baker, New Bedford. 

Wounded and taken prisoner at Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864: 
paroled; sick in hospital at muster-out of regiment. 

William Bently, New Bedford. 

Died at New Orleans, La., June 4, 1863, of disease of heart. 
Joseph H. Bly, New Bedford. 

Died Nov. 10, 1864, of wounds received at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 
1864. 

Hiram B. Bonney, Plymouth. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., July 16, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 
J*eleg S. Borden, New Bedford. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; paroled, March 2, 
lb65; mustered out, July, lb65. 



ROLL OF COMPANY H, 298 

William Bosthoff, New Bedford. 

Transferred to Navy, Aug. 1, 1864. 
Henry C. Bradley, New Bedford. 

Discharged in Lonialana, Feb. 9, 1864, to enter Navy as paymaster's 
steward. 

Albert Braley, New Bedford. 

Transferred to Louisiana Cavalry, January 31, 1868; re -transferred 
to Thirty Eighth, but did not join. 

Arthur E. H. Brooks, New Bedford. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; paroled, March 2, 
1865; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Joseph A. Chadwick, New Bedford. 

Discharged. 
Augustus G. Chapel, New Bedford. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Oct. 7, 1868. 
Josiah C. Churchill, New Bedford. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., July 17, 1863, for disability 
George Crabtree, New Bedford. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19,1864; paroled, March 2, 
1865; absent, sick, at muster-out of regiment. 

Joseph B. Crocker, New Bedford. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Andrew W. Davis, New Bedford. 

Discharged, at Boston, April 10, 1864, for disability. 
Henry O. Davis, New Bedford. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
John W. Davis, New Bedford. 

Discharged, at Fortress Monroe, Va., March 6, 1863, for disa- 
bility. 

Samuel E. Dean, New Bedford. 

Died, at New Bedford, Oct 16, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea, 
(leorge R. Devol, New Bedford. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Leonard Doty, New Bedford. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Timothy F. Doty, New Bedford. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 23, 1868, of chronic diarrhoea. 
John Dunlap, Plymouth. 

Died, on passage from Savannah to Morehead, March 9, 1865, ot 
congestion of the brain. 

Cornelius B. Fish, New Bedford. 

Discharged, at Boston, Dec 9, 1863, for dbability. 
George W. Fish, New Bedford. 

Died, at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 7, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 
25* 



J 



294 THE STORT OP THB THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Jehiel Fisli, New Bedford. 

Died, at Baton Rouge, La., June 28, 1868, of chronic diarrbcoa. 
Perry W. Fisher, New Bedford. 

Wounded, at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; mustered out, 
July, 1865. 

Augustus E. Foster, New Bedford. 

Died, at Baton Rouge, La., June 21, 1868, of wounds received in 
action at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. 

Robert Grew, New Bedfoitl. 

Discharged, at Baton Rouge, La., Sept. 28, 1863, for disability. 
Bartlett HoUnes, Jr., New Bedford. 

Disch arged, at Carrollton, La., Feb. 5, 863, for disability. 
James Hohnes, New Bedford. 

Died, at Baton Rouge, La., Oct. 21, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 
Patrick Honan, New Bedford. 

Transferred to Louisiana Cavalry, June 81, 1863 ; taken prisoner ; 

Jaroled, and rejoined regiment, Feb. 28, 1866 ; mustered out, 
uly, 1865. 

GeoMje S. Howard, New Bedford. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Benjamin Jenks, New Bedford. 

Died, at Baton Rouge, La , Aug. 14, 1868, of ciproitis. 
Ezra S. Jones, New Bedford. 

Died, at Carrollton, La., Jan. 12, 1868, of typhoid fever. 
Shubal Eldridge, Jr., New Bedford. 

Died, at New Orleans, La., June 13, 1868, of chronic diarrhoea. 
Matthias H. Johnson, New Bedford. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1865. 
Charles G. Kimpton, New Bedford. 

Died, at New Orleans, La., April 25, 1868, of chronic diarrhoea. 
James Kimball, Plymouth. 

Discharged, at Powhattan, Md., Sept. 10, 1862, on account of ex- 
cess of maximum. 

Nathan J. Knights, New Bedford. 

Discharged, at Boston, April 11, 1864, for disability. 
Thomas Lapham, New Bedford. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James M. Lawton, New Bedford. 

Discharged, at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 24, 1863, to accept a com- 
mission. 

Alonzo W. Leach, Plymouth. 

Wounded, at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, t864; died. May 22, 1865. 
Horace E. Lewis, New Bedford. 

Died, at Brashear, La., June 1, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 



ROLL OF COMPANY H. 295 

Thomas Nye, New Bedford. 

Mustered out, July, 1868. 
Walter T. Nye, New Bedford. 

Died, at Baton Rouge, i«a., April 10, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 
Jason S. Peokhain, New Bedford. 

Died, at Baton Rouge, La., May 18, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. . 
Orrin D. Perry, New Bedford. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 

Samuel Pent, New Bedford, 

Transferred to Louisiana Cavalry, Jan. 81, 1868; re-transferred, 
but did not join. 

William Phillips, Hanson. ^ 

Wounded, at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; mustered out, 
July, 1866. 

George W. Pierce, New Bedford, 

Transferred to Navy, May 8, 1864. 
Francis Pittsley, New Bedford. 

Transferred to Navy, Aug. 1, 1864. 
Levi Fittsley, New Bedford. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; paroled, March 2, 
1866 ; absent, at muster-out of regiment. 

William Pittsley, New Bedford. 

Died, at Baton Rouge, La., June 18, 1868, of disease of heart. 
James C. Reed, Middleborough. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Joshua Roach, Middleborough. 

Died, at Brashear, La., June 1, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 
James Ryan, Middleborough. 

Died, at New Orleans, La., June 4, 1863, of chronic diarrhoea. 
George W. Soule, Middleborough. 

Discharged, at Baton Rouge, La., Aug. 24, 1668, for disability. 
Joseph Sinmions, New Bedford. 

Transferred to Navy, Aug. 1, 1864. 
Luther P. Williams, New Bedford. 

Wounded, at O^equan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864; absent, sick, at mus- 
ter-out of regiment. 

Robert Willis, New Bedford. 

Discharged, at Hilton Head, Jane 8, 1866. 



296 THE STOBY OF THE THIBTY EIGHTH. 

COMPANY I. 

CAPTAINS. 

James H. Wade, Boston. 
Resigned, March 7, 1868. 
Julius M. Lathrop, Dedham. 

Promoted Captain, and appointed to Company I, Marcb 1,1863; 
died, April 20, 1864, of wounds received in action at Cane River, 
April 28, 1864. 

LIEUTENANTS. 

Osgood W. Waitt, Maiden. 

Resigned, March 7, 1868. 
Vivian K. Spear, Lynn. 

Promoted Ist Lieutenant, and appointed to Company I, March 1, 
1863; wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863; transferred to In- 
valid Corps, Oct. 12, 1868. • 

Nathan Russell, Jr., Cambridge. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant, and appointed to Company I, April 19, 
1868 ; nromoted 1st Lieutenant. Jan. 9,1864; transferred as Regi- 
ment Quartermaster, July 1, 1864. 

Morton D. Mitchell, E. Bridgewater. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant, and appointed to Company I, Nov. 1, 
1862 ; resigned, March 23, 1863 ; died on shipboard on passage 
home. 

James T. Davis, Cambridge. 

Promoted 2d Lieutenant, and appointed to Company 1, March 3, 
1868; promoted 1st Lieutenant, and transferred to Company K, 
Oct. 24, 1868. 

SERGEANTS. 

Oliver R. Walton, Boston. 

Killed at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864. 
James M. Monroe, Roxbury. 

Wounded at Bisland, La., April 13, 1863; discharged at Boston, 
Dec. 18, 1868. 

Louis Z. Caziare, £Ungham. 

Promoted 1st Sergeant, Nov. 1, 1862; received commission, but not 
mustered ; discharged, April 19, 1864, to accept a commission in 
89th U. S. Colored Regiment. Lieut. Caziare recently distin- 
guished himself for bravery and cooluefcs on the occasio'n of the 
disaster to the steamship Great Republic ; and his old comrades 
of the Thirty Eighth have been gratified to see the public com- 
mendation of his conduct. 



ROLL OP OOMPANT I. 207 



Charles H. Thayer, Milton. 

Promoted Sergeant, Nov. 2, 1862; killed m skirmish before Port 
Hudson, La., May 25, 1863. 

William Parker, 3d, Norton. 

Promoted Sergeant, Nov. 1862; 1st Sergeant, May 1, 1864; wouixl- 
ed at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; taken prisoner at Win- 
chester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864; paroled and rejoined Regiment: iv- 
ceived commission, but not mustered; mustered out, July, UHa. 

John E. Simpson, Milton. 

Promoted Sergeant, Nov. 1862; mustered out, July, 1665. 
John G. Grossman, Milton. 

Promoted Corporal, May 26, 1868; Sergeant, July 1, 1863; mus- 
tered out, July 1, 1866. 

Alfred Weston, Needham. 

Promoted Corporal, Sept. 6, 1862; wounded at Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, 1863; Sergeant, Jan. 1, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 
James Wigley, Milton. 

Promoted Corporal, Aug. 16, 1863; Sergeant, May 1, 1864; mus- 
tered out, July, 1865. 

CORPORALS. 

J. Walter Bradlee, Milton. 

Discharged, July 10, 1863, at New Orleans, La., for disability. 
James Kennelly, Melrose. 

Discharged, May 3, 1865, at Mower Hospital, Phil., Pa., for disability. 
Charles H. Moulton, Milton. 

Discharged, March 28, 1863, for disability. 
David B. Brooks, Winchester. 

Transferred to Invalid Corps, April 22, 1864. 
Charles C. Hunt, Milton. 

Discharged, Nov. 24, 1864, at Boston, for disability. 
Charles R. Blaisdell, Lowell. 

Promoted Corporal, Nov. 2, 1862; wounded at Winchester, Va., 
Sept. 19, 1864; discharged. 

Thomas L. Pearce, Milton. 

Promoted Corporal, July 11, 1863; wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., 
Oct. 19, 1864; discharged from hospital, Philadelphia, Pa , May 
2, 1865. 

James Dooley, Lynn. 

Promoted Corporal, Nov. 2, 1862 ; died, June 20, 1863, of wounds 
received before Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. 

George H. Moulton, Milton. 

Promoted Corporal, March 29, 1863; wounded at Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, 1863; on colors; wounded at Opequan Creek, Sept 19, 
1864 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 



298 THE STORY OF THE THIBTY EIGHTH. 

Everett A. Grant, Milton. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863; Promoted Corporal, 
July 1, 1868; mastered out, July, 1866. 

Charles G. Littlefield, Roxbury. 

Wounded at Winchester, Ya., Sept. 19, 1864; promoted Corporal, 
Jan. 1, 1864; mustered out, July, 1866. 

George P. Cody, Winthrop. 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1864; mustered out, July, 1866. 

MUSICIANS. 

Claudius T. Williams, Roxbury. 

Discharged, Aug. 24, 1868, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Charles Kenniston, Melrose. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1868; mustered out, July, 
1866. 

WAGONER. 

Marcus L. Daggett,-Wrentham. 
Mustered out, July, 1866. 

PRIVATES. 

William Alvin, Wrentham. 

Discharged, May 27, 1863, at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 

Newell Barber, Medway. 

Died, Aug. 14, 1868, at Baton Bouge, La. 
George Belus, Needham. 

Discharged, Nov. 21, 1862, at Stewart^s Mansion Hospital, for dis- 
ability. 

Nelson W. Bickford, Melrose. 

Discharged, Sept. 28, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
£lbridge Blackman, Milton. 

Taken prisoner at Cedljr Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; paroled; mus- 
tered out, July, 1866. 

James Boyle, Lynn. 

Transferred to Invalid Corps, April 22, 1864. 
Charles Bronsdon, Roxbury. 

Discharged, Aug. 22, 1863, at Baton Rougej La., for disability. 
Jonathan H. Chandler, Milton. 

Discharged, July 3, 1863, at St. James Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 

David A. Clark, Medway. 

Taken prisoner at Winchester, Ya., Sept. 19, 1864; paroled; Pro- 
vost Guard at Annapolis, Md., at muster-out of Regiment. 



ROLL OF COMPANY I. 239 

Edmund N. Clark, Med way. 

Discharged, Dec. 14, 1864, at Boston, for disability. 
Daniel Connors, Wrentbam. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Ferdinand Corman, Wayland. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; mustered out, 
July, 1866. 

James P. Croty, Wrentham. 

Wounded at Bisland, La., April 13, 1863; absent sick at Beach 
Street Hospital, Boston, at muster-out of Regiment. 

Michael Farry, Wrentham. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1863 ; wounded at Cedar 
Creek, Ya., Oct 19, 1864; absent sick at Island Grove Hospital, 
R. I , at muster-out of Regiment. 

Samuel Fairy, Wrentham. 

Died, Feb. 4, 1863, at Carrollton, La. 
Dennis Fitzgerald, Lynn. 

Transferred, Aug. 13, 1863, to 3d Mass. Cavalry. 
Cassius M. Flagg, Hamilton. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Patrick Flannagan, Needham. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Harland P. Floyd, Methuen. 

Discharged, March 4, 1863, at Convalescent Camp, Alexandria, Ya., 
for disability. 

Edward Freel, Norton. 

Discharged, Feb. 14, 1863, at Stewart^s Mansion Hospital, Balti- 
more, Md., for disability. 

Charles H. Graham, Milton. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., June 14, 1868; transferred to Yet. 
Reserve Corps, May 1, 1864. 

George W. Green, Wayland. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
George W. Hall Milton. 

Wounded at Winchester, Ya., Sept. 19, 1864: died, May 1, 1866, 
from effects of wounds, at Frederick Hospital, ^Id. 

James F. Hayden, Lincoln. 

Discharged, Dec. 9, 1862, at Convalescent Camp, Alexandria, Ya., 
for diMbility. 
Thomas W. Hayden, Lincoln. 

Acting Hospital Steward; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Edwin A. Hey wood. Bridge wat«r. • 

Died, Aug. 21, 1863, at Church Hospital, Baton Rouge, La. 
Thomas W. Hevey, Hingham. 

Killed in action, at Bisland, La., April 13, 1868. 



330 THE STORY OF THE THIETr EIGHTH. 

Abraliam Holmes, Jr., Roxbury. 

Act Hospital Steward; discharged, March 17, 1864, for disability. 
Charles C. Hunt, Milton. 

Discharged, Nov. 24, 1864, at Boston, for disability. 
John y. Hunt, Norton. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
George A. Jones, Sudbury. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
John P. Jones, Milton. 

Discharged at Lynnfield, for disability. 
Patrick Eelley, Mebose. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Thomas Kelley, Roxbury. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; mustered out, 
July, 1866. 

John Lacey, Milton. 

Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; absent sick in hos- 
pital, Baltimore, Md., at muster-out of Regiment 

Thomas Leach, LowelL 

Discharged, May 16, 1864, at New Orleans, La., for disability. 
Gilbert H. Leland, Medway. 

Died, June 8, 1868, in Hospital, at Baton Rouge, La. 
Elias Mann, Waltham. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, for disability, Jan. 7, 1865. 
Albert,T. B. Martin, Milton. 

Died, June. 1868, at New Orleans, La., of wounds received at Port 
Hudson, La., June 14, 1863. 

John Mellen, Wayland. 

Killed in action, at Bisland, La., April 18, 1863. 
Luther Moulton, Jr., Milton. 

Discharged, June 1, 1863, at Charity Hospital, New Orleans, La., 
for disability. 
Dennis Mullen, Wayland. 

Transferred to La. Cavalry. Feb. 8, 1868 ; re-transferred to Regiment, 
March 1, 1865 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 

James Nelson, Wrentham. 
Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Hiram T. Nye, Milton. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
William L. Ordway, Lowell. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, Sept. 26, 1863. 
Elijah Palmer, Newton. 

Wounded at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864; absent sick in hos- 
pital, Philadelphia, Pa., at muster-out of Regiment 



ROLL OF COMPANY I. 301 

George W. Pearce, Milton. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
George Rice, Melrose. 

Absent, sick, at muster-out of Regiment. 
William Rich, Wrentham. 

Muetered out, July, 1865. 
William Rimmelle, Needham. 

Hospital attendant; mustered out, July, 1866. 
Brougham Roberts, Medway. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Edward Shannon, Milton. » 

Wounded at Bisland, La., April 13, 1863; died of wounds in hos- 
pital at Brashear City, La., May 6, 1863. 

John Shanahan, Rehoboth. 

On Ship Island when last heard from. 
Thomas Sheahan, Watertown. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
John Sias, 2d, Milton. 

Discharged at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La., July 24, 1868, 
for disability. 

Joseph Snow, Needham. 

Discharged at New Orleans, La., July 3, 1863, for disability. 
George H. Stone, Bolton. 

Died in Church Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., July 1, 1863. 
Terence Sweeney, Milton. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
James W. Thayer, Norton! 

Wounded at Port Hudson, La., May 26, 1863 ; transferred to Yet. 
Reserve Corps, May 81, 1864. 

Stephen Thayer, Norton. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Ya., Oct. 19, 1864 ; mustered out, 
July, 1865. 

Edwin A. Taylor, Needham. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Ya., Oct. 19, 1864; mustered out, 
July, 1865. 

Otis Tucker, Bridgewater. 

Died in hospital, at Fortress Monroe, Ya., Nov. 80, 1862. 
Georfje E. Vose, Milton. 

Discharged at Stewart^s Mansion Hospital, Baltimore, Md., Nov. 
7, 1862. 

Richard Welsh, Bridgewater. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
James E. West, Lincoln. 

Discharged at Marine Hospital, New Orleans, La , July 29, 1868, for 
disability. 

26 



302 THi: STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Luther S. Wildes, Methuen. 

Discharged at Ck>nvaleflcent Camp, Fairfax, Va., Feb. 7, 1868, for 
disability. 

Daniel V. De Rochemont, Boston. 

Joined Re^raent, Dec. 29, 1863; promoted Corporal, May 1, 1865; 
transfierred to 26th Mass. Yolfi. Jnne22, 1865. 

Benjamin F. Parker, Boston. 

Joined Rejriment, Dec. 29, 1868; transferred to 26th Mass. Vet. 
Vols, June 22, 1866. 

Marcus T. Baker, Boston. 

Joined Rejs^ment, Jan. 12, 1865: transferred to 26th Mass. Vet. 
Vols., June 22, 1866. 

James Farry, Abington. 

Joined Regiment, April 80, 1864; died at St James Hospital, New 
Orleans, La., July 12, 1864. 



OOMPANT K. 
CAPTAIN. 



James H. Slade, Boston. 

Discharged at CarroUton, La., February 25, 1868. 
Arthur Hodges, Cambridge. 

Promoted Captain, April, 1868; on detached service in Engineer 
Corps, firom Oct. 20, 1868. 



LIEUTENANTS. 

Samuel Gault, Boston. 

Promoted Captain, Dec. 4, 1862, and appointed to Co. A. 
George H. Copeland, Cambridge. 

Promoted Ist Lieutenant, May 1,1864: transferred from Co. A; 
wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863 ; mustered out, July, 1866. 
GeoT^e T. Martin, Melrose. 

Promoted 1st Lieutenant, Apr. 14, 1868; resigned, Aug. 12, 1868, 
on account of disability ; died after leaving service. 

Daniel W. Bowen, Westport 

Promoted Sergeant-Major, March 3, 1863 ; 2d Lieutenant, April 14, 
1863 ; resigned, August 4, 1864. 



EOLL OF COMPANY K. 308 



SERGEANTS. 

Greorge H. Henshaw, Boston. 

Promoted 1st Sergeant, March 4, 1863; received commission as 
lieutenant, but not mustered; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Alexander Von Palen, Hamilton. 

Color-bearer in winter of 1862 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 
William H. Martin, Melrose. 

On detached service in Ordnance Department; mustered out, July, 
1865. 

Henry P. Oakman, Marshfield. 

Discharged, October 27, 1863, for disability. 
George H. Story, Manchester. 

Promoted Sergeant, March 4, 1863; wounded at the Battle of Cedar 
Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Henry W. Howard, Waltham. 

Promoted Serjeant, Mar. 10, 1863 ; discharged at Boston, Sept 24, 
1864, to accept commission. 

George B. Oldham, Hanover. 

Promoted Serjeant, Nov. 1, 1863 ; discharged, Feb. 1864, to accept 
commission in Corps d'Afrique. 

Henry C. Gardner, Hanover. 

Promoted Sergeant, March 25, 1864; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Lewis B. Abbott, Hull. 

Promoted Corporal, June 1, 1863, Sergeant, Jan. 1, 1865 ; mustered 
out, July, 1865. 

CORPORALS. 

Samuel Ross, Jr., Marshfield. 

Transferred to 1st Louisiana Cavalry, Feb. 5, 1863. 
Henry H. Shedd, Brookline. 

Discharged, Oct. 24, 1862, at Alexandria, Va. 
William H. Bates, Hanover. 

Discharged, July 9, 1863, at New Orleans, La., for disability. 
James H. Pike, Brookline. 

Died at 'Baton Rouge, La., July 24, 1863, of remittent fever. 
Edward L, Sargent, Brookline. 

Died at Brewick City, La., May, 1863, of chronic diarrhcea. 
Charles G. Sherburne, Westport. 

Promoted Corporal, Aug. 20, 1862; died at Baton Rouge, La., of 
wounds received at Cane River, April 23, 1864. 

Joshua E. Bates, Hanover. 

Promoted Corporal, Jan. 12, 1863; died, Aug. 10, 1863, at Baton 
Rouge, La., of typhoid fever. 



304 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

George O. Noyes, Melrose. 

Promoted Corporal, Mar. 10, 1863 ; wounded at Port Hudson, La., 
June 14, 1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Andrew J. Crowell, Hamilton. 

Promoted Corporal, March 25,1863; taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, 
Oct. 19, 1864; paroled, July, 1866. 

Lyman Russell, Hanover. 

Promoted Corporal, April 26, 1863; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Mareus P. Russell, Hanover. 

Promoted Corporal, March 14, 1863 ; taken prisoner, Oct. 19, 1864, 
paroled. 

Hiram I*. Abbott, Westport. 

Promoted Corporal, Nov. 1, 1863; on colors; mustered out, July, 
1865. 

Benjamin Tower, Melrose. 

Promoted Corporal, Aug. 10, 1863; wounded at Cedar Creek, Oct. 
19, 1864; Mustered out, July, 1865. 

Charles J. Worthen, Brookline. 

Promoted Corporal, May 4, 1864 ; mustered out, July, 1865. 
Henry W. Pierce, Holliston, 

Promoted Corporal, May 1, 1865 ; discharged, June, 8, 1865, on ac- 
count of wounds received at Opequan Creek, Sept. 19, 1864. 

MUSICIAKB. 

Frederick White, Weymouth. 

Transferred to Invalid Corps, Sept. 26, 1863. 
Daniel B. Estes, Westport. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 

PRIVATES. 

Otis J. Andrews, Holliston. 

Acted as musician ; mustered out. July, 1865. 
John S. Adams, Waltham. 

Discharged, Dec. 22, 1864. 
William W. Averill, Westport. 

Taken prisoner, April 13, 1865, at Goldsboro, K. C. ; paroled. 
Edwin Atwell, Marshfield. 

Wounded at Opequan, Sept. 19, 1864; sent to the hospital, June 
2, 1865 ; mustered out, August, 1865. 

Robert Ames, Marshfield. 

Died at Baton Rouge, La., June 24, 1663, of chronic diarhcRa. 
William O. Andrews, Holliston. 

Discharged, Nov. 3, 1863, at Boston, Mass., for disability. 



ROLL OP COMPANY K. 305 

vVilliam J. Baker, Marshfield. 

Discharged, Jan. 26,, 1863, at Baltimore, Md., for disability. 
Richard Baker, Holliston. 

Discharged, March 27, 1863,^ at Carrollton, La., ibr disability. 
Levi W. Bailey, Marshfield. 

Wounded at the battle of Opeqnau Creek, Sept. 19, 1864; dis- 
charged, June, 1865. 
Albert E^ Bates, Hanover. 

Died, "^June 23, 1863, at Morganza, La., of chronic diarrhoea and 
fever. 

George H. Bryant, Westport 

Discharged, March 24, 1863, at Baltimpre, Md., for disability. 
Thomas R. Brodhurst, Westport. 

Discharged at Baltimore, Md., Nov. 26, 1862, for disability. 
Atkins Brown, Jr., HoUiston. 

Died, Oct 30, 1864, at Winchester, Va., from wounds received at 
Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864. 

Levi C. Brooks, Marshfield. 

Died, April 23, 1863, from wounds received at Cane River, La., 
April 19, 1863. 

James Birch, Chekusford. 

Discharged, Sept. 24, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Warren R. Dalton, Westport 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Solon David, Westport. 

Mustered out, July, 1866. 
Francis Deshon, Melrose. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Edward David, Westport. 

Missing at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863 [supposed killed]. 
Charles David, Westport. 

Discharged at Baltimore, spring of 1863, for disability . 
William H. Dodge, Hamilton. 

Killed at battle of Opequan Creek, Sept 19, 1864. 
Manton Everett, Boston. 

Died, April 16, 1863, from wounds received at Bisland, April 18. 
Turner Ewell, Jr., Marshfield. 

Discharged, Aug. 24, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
James W. Emerson, Melrose. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
James W. Fish, Marshfield. 

Died in Savannah, June, 1865, of typhoid fever. 
Francis H. Fish, Marshfield. 

Discharged, Feb. 13, 1863, at Baltimore, Mar}'lau(l, for disability. 
26* 



306 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Seth O. Fitts,' Marshfield. 

Wounded at Opequan Creek, September 19, 1864. 
Charles C. Gilson, Manchester. 

Regimental and Brigade Postmaster from spring of 1863 ; mastered 
out, July, 1865. 

James Green, Marshfield. 

Sunstruck in Valley of Shenandoah ; mustered out, July, 1865. 

Albion Hatch, Marshfield. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Andrew W. Hatch, Marshfield. 

Died, August 22, 1864, at New Orleans, La., of chronic diar- 
rhoea. 

Charles P. Hatch, Marshfield. 
' Mustered out, July, 1865. 

Israel H. Hatch, Marshfield. 

Discharged, Dec. 3, 1862, at Baltimore, Md., for disability. 

Albert Holmes, Marshfield. 

Mustered out, July 1866. 
James R. Howard, Melrose. 

Discharged, Dec. 5, 1863, at Boston, for disabilty. 
Richard Hai^ave, Hamilton. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Nathan H. Holbrook, Holliston. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Alvan A. Hasty, Westport. 

Wounded at Port Hudson, June 14, 1863 ; discharged, Dec. 15, 
1863, at Boston, for disability. 

Wilbur F. Harrington, Marshfield. 

Died, June 10, 1863, at New Orleans, La., of chronic diarrhoea. 
George A. Jenks, Westport. 

Discharged, Nov. 27, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Alfred S. Jewett, Manchester. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Lewis Josselyn, Marshfield. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Eli C. Josselyn, Marshfield. 

Discharged, July 15, 1864, at Boston, for chronic didtrhcea. 
George R. Josselyn, Marshfield. 

Died, Sept 15, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., of chronic diarrhoea. 
John Kendall, Westport. 

Discharged, Feb. 13, 1863, at Baltimore, Md.,.for disability. 
Ira P. Knowlton, Hamilton. 

Transferred to Invalid Corps, Dec. 12, 1863. 



ROLL OP COMPANY K. 307 

Elisha A. Loring, Maiden. « 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Benjamin Lynde, Melrose. 

Died, August 18, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., of chronic diarrhoia. 
Leonard H. Miller, Waltham. 

Died, July, 13, 1863, at New Orleans, La., of chronic diarrbcea. 
Dw^ht Metcalf, HoUiston. 

Taken prisoner at Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864; sick in Richmond, 
Va., Feb. 22, 1865. 

David J. Mixer, Brookline, 

Taken prisoner, Oct. 19, 1864, at Cedar Creek, Va.; died Jan. 18, 
1865, in Salisbury, N. C. 

Charjes A. Nichols, Marshfield. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Otis B. Oakman, Hanover. 

Discharged, Nov. 26, 1862, at Baltimore, Md., for disability. 
Newton Organ, Maiden. 

Mustered out, July, 18^5. 
Charles W. Osborne, Marshfield. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Charles F. Perry, Marshfield. 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 
Edmond Philips, Marshfield. 

Wounded in hand, May, 27, 1863, at Port Hudson, La. ; discharged, 
August, 24, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La. 

George E. Richardson, Melrose. 

Taken prisoner, Oct. 19, 1864, at Cedar, Creek ; died at Salisbury, 
N. C, Nov. 3, 1864. 

Martin Ramsdell, Jr., Marshfield. 

Discharged, Dec. 4, 1862, at Baltimore, Md., for disability. 
Freeman A. Bamsdell, Jr., Marshfield. 

Died, June 4, 1863, at New Orleans, La., of chronic diarrhcea. 
Turner Stetson, Hanover. 

Discharged, Nov. 27, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Arthur B. Shepard, Hanover. 

Died, Feb. 26, 1863, at CarroUton, La., of typhoid fever. 
Francis T. Sheldon, Hanover. 

Discharged, Jan. 26, 1864, at Boston, for disability. 
Josiah Stoddard, Jr., Marshfield. 

Died, Nov. 19, 1862, at Baltimore, Md., of typhoid fever. 
Larkin W. Story, Manchester. 

Discharged, Aug. 17, 1863, at Baton Rouge, La., for disability. 
Samuel H. Sanford, Jr., Westport 

Mustered out, July, 1865. 



308 THE STORY OF THE THIRTY EIGHTH. 

Sanford White, Weymouth. 

Transferred to Invalid Corps, Sept. 26, 1863. 
Sylvanus H. Wight, Westport. 

Detailed as hospital assistant nearly two vears ; mustered out July, 
1865. 

Job H. Perkins, Roxbury. 

Enlisted, April 1, 1864; transferred to 26th Mass., June, 1865. 
William H. Perkins, Boston. 

Enlisted, Dec. 22, 1 863 ; missing while on reconnoissance near Mor- 
ganza. La. ; returned home aiter the war closed. 



REMARKS ON THE ROLLS. 

The Thirty Eighth Regiment received but few recruits after 
leaving the State ; and consequently it soon became reduced 
in numbers below the standard required by the War Deparft- 
ment for a ftJl complement of officers ; so that there were no 
promotions, except to warrant offices, after the second year. 
Previously to being mustered out, complimentary commissions 
were issued, corresponding to the vacancies. 

In the foregoing rolls of the various companies, whenever 
the date is not mentioned in connection with a sergeant or 
corporal, it is to be understood that he held the original 
appointment 

The name of the town to which each man is credited, except 
in two or three instances, is the one for which he enlisted, and 
is not always his place of residence. 

Should any reader discover any error in the foregoing rolls, 
he will confer a favor upon the author by informing him of it. 



i